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Understanding Water and Terrorism Understanding Water and Terrorism Document Transcript

  • What others are saying about Understanding Water and Terrorism “A terrific expose on water terrorism. You hit the nail on the head with a sledgehammer. Nice going. It certainly is a must read.” Clive Cussler, Author “It’s interesting. An easy read. Non technical.” - Robert L. Burdic, Medical Operations Analyst - Kaiser Permanente, formerly Medical Lab Specialist - Dept. of Communicable Disease & Immunology - Walter Reed Army Institute of Research “The Water and Terrorism book is essential reading for survival in the 21st century. It opened my eyes to my responsibility as a member of this society and to the risks of being uninformed.” Helena Mariposa, Author and Concerned Citizen “This book should be required reading for all front line responders.” Edward L. Bowles, GIS and Mapping Specialist - Environmental and Mining Industries (Retired) and Concerned Citizen “A useful, wide-angle snapshot of water and terrorism today.” Steve Posner, Attorney “This book opens the vital discussion of the what & why we should do to protect the jugular vein of our fresh water supply.” Bryan Townsend, Professional Speaker & Writer “An important and readable primer on the subject for the concerned citizen; a meticulously referenced launching pad for the professional who wants to delve into the matter further.” Nick Kaluk, Jr., M.D., Physician and Healthcare Law Attorney
  • About the author, H. Court Young Carole Lomond, Editor of Views, a local newspaper says: quot;The Lookout Mountain Water District gained more than a new 'qualified' board member in the recent May special district election. Court Young is an author and publisher of books, and educational CD-ROMs. He is a geologist who has specialized in water systems for 25 years and consults on environmental clean-up projects involving water.quot;
  • Understanding Water and Terrorism Herbert C. Young Published By: BurgYoung Publishing, LLC 4105 E. Florida, #300 Denver, CO 80222 All rights reserved. Copyright © 2003, BurgYoung Publishing, LLC. First Edition September, 2003 This book is designed to present a general and introduc- tory view of the complex issues involving water and terrorism globally as well as in the United States. It discusses problems and conflicts that affect every water user, as well as possible solutions to those problems and conflicts. Every effort has been made to make this book as complete and accurate as possible, but no warranty of suitability or purpose, or fitness is implied. The information is provided on an “as-is” basis. BurgYoung Publishing, LLC., and/or the author shall have neither liability nor responsibility to any person or entity with respect to any loss or damages in connection with or arising from the information contained in this book. ISBN NUMBER: 1-893478-07-6 THIS BOOK PROPERTY OF:
  • Dedicated to my fellow Americans and Water Providers and Utility workers across the United States. In Memory of September 11, 2001
  • “With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the end of the cold War, our security environment has undergone a profound transformation...But, new, deadly challenges have emerged from rogue states and terrorists. It has taken almost a decade for us to comprehend the true nature of this new threat.” The National Security Strategy, September, 2002
  • Contents Introduction....................................................... 18 Water Infrastructure .......................................... 22 Water Systems Around the World.................................22 Critical Infrastructure in the United States ...................22 United States Water Infrastructure................................23 City Water Supply Systems in the United States..........29 Rural Water Systems in the United States ....................33 The Relationship to Other Key Industries ...................36 Water and Electricity ....................................................37 Water and Communication System ..............................39 Water and Computers ...................................................40 Water and the Chemical Industry .................................41 Ports, Coastlines and Navigable Waters .......................41 Water as a Weapon ............................................ 46 Physical Damage to Water Systems .............................50 Biological and Chemical Agents in Water....................51 Water and Electricity ....................................................55 The Chemical Industry .................................................58 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)...........................61 The Communication System ........................................65 Agriculture....................................................................66 Emergency Preparedness & Your Water Supply ..........68 Terrorism........................................................... 70 Water and Terrorism .....................................................71 Water and Terrorism in the United States.....................73 Water System Vulnerability ..........................................75 The Aging Water Infrastructure and Terrorism.............82
  • Understanding Water & Terrorosm The Overburdened Electrical Grid and Terrorism ........84 Coastal Waters and Terrorism.......................................86 The Terrorists .................................................... 90 Who are the Terrorists?.................................................90 Terrorists in History......................................................91 Al-Qaeda.......................................................................95 Domestic Terrorists.......................................................97 Homeland Security.......................................... 100 The Legislation ...........................................................100 The Department of Homeland Security......................102 DHS and Cyber Security ............................................107 DHS and Maritime Security .......................................114 DHS and Energy Security...........................................116 DHS and Business Security........................................117 DHS and Bioterror Security .......................................118 The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 ....................118 DHS and Border Security ...........................................120 The USA Patriot Act ...................................................121 Help for Local, State and Private Entities ..................128 Responders and Responding Agencies ........... 132 The Responding Agencies ..........................................132 Incident Response.......................................................133 The Responders - Public Health .................................135 The Responders - Coast Guard...................................138 The Responders and Computer Resources .................143 The Environmental Protection Agency.......................144 The Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) .............................................145 U. S. Bureau of Customs & Border Protection...........145 Page ix
  • Other Federal, State and Local Agencies....................145 Countering Terrorism of Water Supplies ........ 146 Emergency Response Plans ........................................146 Preparing Vulnerability Assessments .........................146 Marine Counter-terrorism ..........................................147 Specific Counter-terrorism Measures .........................148 Indicators of a Possible Chemical/Biological Incident .......................................................................151 Personal Safety Considerations ..................................154 Being Prepared................................................ 156 Preparing for the Unknown ........................................156 Preparedness and Terrorism Information....................157 Chemical and Biological Agents - General Information .................................................................163 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ........................165 Basic Water Treatment................................................166 Food and Supplies ......................................................167 Sheltering in Place ......................................................171 Coping with the Trauma of Terrorism ........................173 Bioterrorism Act..........................................A-178 EPA Instructions for Community Water Systems - Bioterrorism Act Compliance................... B-180 Index ............................................................... 208 How to Contact Us:......................................... 216 Page x
  • Understanding Water & Terrorosm Page xi
  • About The Author Herbert C. Young (H. Court Young) has been involved in water and water right issues most of his life. His dad, Her- bert T. Young, was a pioneer in the private development of water and water rights in Colorado. An only child, Court is a native of Colorado, born in Denver. He graduated from the University of Arizona as a geologist. After college, he worked with his dad on the development of two private Colorado water projects - the Vidler Tun- nel Project and later the Sheephorn Project. The Vidler Tunnel was started by Reese Vidler in the early part of the 19th century as a railroad tunnel. It was connected to the Colorado Southern Railroad system. The Vidler Tunnel Project is a transmountain diversion project bringing water from the West Slope to the East Slope (Denver Metropolitan area) under the Continental Divide. The tunnel itself is 1.5 miles long, transporting water from the headwaters of Peru Creek (above Dillon Reservoir) to the headwaters of Levenworth Creek (above Georgetown). Gold, silver, lead and zinc from the eastern end of the tunnel were actually transported to smelters in Denver via the Argentine Central Railroad. Mr. Vidler was not able to complete the entire tunnel before his death in 1910. About 1/2 mile remained to be completed on the west end. Court’s dad envisioned the Vidler as a water diversion tunnel in the late 1940s. He purchased the mining claims, put the funding together to buy the water rights and com- plete the tunnel itself. The final 2,500 feet of tunnel were completed in 1968. Court notes, “One of the thrills of my life was walking through the Vidler Tunnel for the first time in November, 1968 with my Dad.” Water from the Peru Creek Basin is collected by a series
  • of diversion points and pipelines and funneled into the tunnel. It flows by gravity to the East Slope and discharg- es into Levenworth Creek, then into Clear Creek. During the late 1970s, a large multi-reservoir project, the Sheephorn Project, was proposed by Vidler Tunnel Water Co. Using private venture capital, the ultimate goal was to make more water available to the East Slope by increas- ing storage on the West Slope. This project included a series of reservoirs, including the proposed 200,000 acre- foot Sheephorn Reservoir on the Colorado River below Kremmling, Colorado. During part of this time, Court worked with W. W. Wheel- er and Associates, a water engineering firm in Denver, Colorado. This firm did the primary water engineering and water rights work for the Vidler Tunnel Project and the Sheephorn Project. The first edition of Understanding Water Rights and Con- flicts, ISBN: 0-9619680-0-1, was written about ten years after the death of Court’s father. “I wrote the first book both as a tribute to Dad, and because I wanted to help educate the public about water issues,” says Court. The first edition came out about the time that the Two Forks controversy was raging. “In my opinion, the public did not have the knowledge to adequately judge what was happening,” says Court. “Decisions made then are still affecting us, almost 15 years later. In Colorado alone, the drought of 2002 re- ally brought many of the Two Forks issues back into the limelight.” With much of the United States in drought during the first years of the 21st century, water issues were more con- fusing than ever. “I did not want us to commit the same mistakes twice with respect to water issues. I wanted to, at least, try to make some of the issues more understandable
  • for the general public, as well as provide a general guide and reference source,” notes Court. The impact of September 11, 2001 has changed America in a variety of ways. Court describes the reason for writ- ting about water and terrorism. “After reviewing a large amount of information about wa- ter conflicts and terrorism, I wanted to provide a general guide and reference for a confused and somewhat anxious public. In the end, we are all vulnerable and are also our own best resource for protection.” His interest in the Water Conflicts, Wars and Terrorism chapter of his book Understanding Water Rights and Conflicts, Second Editon, prompted him to expand that information into this book entitled Understanding Water and Terrorism. Without water, life as we know it can not exist.
  • A Source of our Water - Continental Divide and Upper Peru Creek Basin - Looking East toward Denver, Colorado
  • Author’s Note I became interested in Water and Terrorism issues when I was writing the chapter about Water Conflicts, Wars and Terrorism for my book Understanding Water Rights and Conflicts, Second Edition, ISBN: 1-893478-05-x. The more research that I did, the more I became convinced that the public needed more information. Few events in our lives impact us like the terrorist attack on the World Trade Center Towers in New York City, NY, the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., and the aborted attack over Pennsylvania on September 11, 2001. This event, known as September 11, or 911, became synonymous with terrorism in America. Approximately 3,000 lives were lost, two skyscrapers were destroyed and American lives were disrupted, as well as changed psychologically forever. With respect to terrorism, America lost its inno- cence. However, Americans responded. First by striking back at terrorism around the world, then by working on prepara- tions to protect against another attack. Several landmark pieces of legislation were passed by Congress and signed into law by President Bush. The USA Patriot Act and the Bioterrorism Act, as well as the creation and authoriza- tion of the Department of Homeland Security will have a profound impact on our American Society. Much of what is being done, however, can only really be effective if Americans themselves become informed and aware. This is the reason for this book Understanding Water and Terrorism. Sincerely, H. Court Young
  • Understanding Water & Terrorosm Page xvii
  • Introduction “We used to think that energy and water would be critical issues for the next century. Now we think that water will be the critical issue.” Mostafa Tolba of Egypt, Former head of the United Nations Environmental Program One of the stated goals of the National Strategy for Com- bating Terrorism, February, 2003 is defending United States citizens and interests at home and abroad. Part of this is reducing the vulnerability of United States person- nel, critical infrastructure and other U.S. interests. The following is a quote from that document; “Objective: Enhance measures to ensure the integrity, reliability, and availability of critical physical and information-based infrastructures at home and abroad. Protection of vital systems is a shared responsibility of the public and private sectors, working collectively with the owners, operators, and users of those systems.” The American Water Works Association (AWWA) notes in its report Protecting Our Water, Drinking Water Secu- rity In America After 9/11; “A secure water supply really is a cornerstone of homeland security.” Humans can live only minutes without air, several days without water and weeks without food. Yet, for most of us, the thought of not having “a drink of water” when we are thirsty is foreign. Very few of us would deliberately forgo a drink of water for even a day. The average amount of water used per person (depending on activity) is .2 to 15 liters a day (3.7 liters=1 gallon) with the average drink being .2 liters. Page 18
  • Understanding Water and Terrorism Because water is so important to our survival, our water supply systems were identified as one of eight critical infrastructure systems in Presidential Decision Directive 63 (PDD 63). This Directive issued on May 22, 1998 was intended to achieve and maintain the capability to protect our nation’s critical infrastructure from intentional acts of terror. The following quote from The National Strategy for Homeland Security puts the issue into perspective, “Unless we act to prevent it, a new wave of terrorism potentially involving the world’s most destructive weapons looms in America’s future. It is a challenge as formidable as any ever faced by our nation.” Further, regarding the terrorists, The National Strategy for Homeland Security notes, “Terrorists are strategic actors. They choose their targets deliberately based on weakness they observe in our defenses and our preparedness.” A Congressional Research and Service Report entitled Terrorism and Security Issues Facing the Water Infra- structure Sector by Claudia Copeland and Betsy Cody dated February 26, 2003 states, “The September 11, 2001 attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon have drawn attention to the security of many institutions, facilities and systems in the United States, including the nation’s water supply and water quality infrastructure. These systems have long been recognized as being potentially vulnerable to terrorists attacks of various types, including physical disruption, bioterrorism/chemical contamination and cyber attack.” The American Water Works Association (AWWA) in its paper entitled Protecting Our Water, Drinking Water Se- curity in America After 9/11 notes, Page 19
  • Introduction “While America’s water utilities are safe today, they are not immune against terrorist attack and a successful attack on the water supply, while unlikely, could be catastrophic. A secure water supply is really a cornerstone of homeland security.” In his paper entitled A Chemical and Biological Warfare Threat: USAF Water Systems at Risk, September, 1991, Major Donald C. Hickman, USAF, puts the threat to water systems in a different perspective. He discusses the com- mon biological and chemical agents, but goes on to say, “The agents, however, are not the only chemicals a saboteur might use in drinking water. The world is replete with dangerous industrial chemicals, hazardous materials, pesticides, fungicides and the like. Many of these are acutely toxic to humans in doses obtainable by deliberate water system contamination. ... In summary potential adversaries have a veritable supermarket menu of weapons choices.” Major Hickman is with the USAF Counterproliferation Center, is a graduate in biology, with a master of science in environmental engineering and is a certified industrial hygienist. His report is a discussion of the vulnerability of United States Air Force Bases via the water supply sys- tem that serves them. He states that, “This analysis should raise some eyebrows. ... An adversary could disable USAF operations with a thermos of bacteria for less than $10,000.” The security of America’s water supply really depends not just on the government, or water supplier but on all of us. Ultimately, the responsibility for maintaining our safe water supply is noted in the AWWA report Protecting Our Water, Drinking Water Security After 9/11. “In many cities and small towns the public is the first line of defense, serving as an extra set of eyes watching over Page 20
  • Understanding Water and Terrorism key utility assets such as tanks, reservoirs and even fire hydrants.” Because we are all water users, one key to our water secu- rity is to become better informed about our water supply systems, and water suppliers. “There will be no quick or easy end to this conflict.” President George W. Bush, February, 2003 Page 21
  • Index B Ballast 42, 43 Bank Secrecy Act of 1970 122, A 123 FinCEN 122, 123 absorption 61 Battelle Memorial Institute 72 Aging Water Infrastructure 82 Bin Laden 91, 95, 96 Agriculture 66 Biological agents 46, 52, 126 Albert Einstein 139 biology 126, 127 Al Qaeda 67 colorless 152 Al Qaida 90 microbiologists 132 American College of Preventive odorless 152 Medicine 136, 137 toxicologists 132 American Library Association biological agents 46, 48, 52, 53, 128 54, 55 American Red Cross 155, 159, Biological incidents 152 166, 176 Approach and response strate- American Society for Microbiol- gies 154 ogy 126 Decontamination measures 154 American Water Works Associa- Protective clothing 154 tion 18, 19, 49, 50, 118, Biological Warfare Agents 53, 54 130, 144, 147 Biological Warfare Agents as ammonium nitrate 140 Threats to Drinking Water anthrax 46, 55, 94, 97 151 Army Corps of Engineers 28 bioterrorism 22, 104, 126, 127 Aryan Nation 90, 92, 97 Blackout of 2003 66, 77, 78, 85, Associated Press 82 109, 160, 161 Association of Metropolitan Wa- Boulder, Colorado 83 ter Agencies 74, 118 Bureau of Reclamation 28, 34 Association of Public Health Laboratories 135 C Aurora 30 cargo 41, 42, 43, 147, 148 AWWA 46, 50 Container Security Initiative A Chemical and Biological War- 143 fare Threat, USAF Water Centers for Disease Control and Systems at Risk 48, 52 Prevention 135, 136, 137, A Chemical and Biological War- 138, 159, 171, 172, 173, fare Threat: USAF Water 176 Systems at Risk 20 Center for Defense Information Page 208
  • Understanding Water & Terrorosm 90 cybersabotage 51 Chemicals 36, 58 cyberwarfare 104 chemicals 25, 36, 37, 41, 46, 51, D 59, 61 chemical agents 46, 48 David Moore 48 chemical companies 59 Delaware Aqueduct System 31 chemical manufacturers 59 Denver 29, 30 chemical protection suits 134 Denver Post 121, 124, 128, 144 China 143 disinfectant 54 Chlorine 36, 53, 54, 58, 61, 64 Domestic Terrorists 97 chlorine 54, 55, 58, 59, 60, 61, drought 78, 80 62, 65 drought of 2002 51 Chlorine Chemistry 54 cholera 46 E City Water Tunnel 30, 31, 32 electrical power 66 Clean Air Act 59, 60 electricity 27, 28, 37, 38 Cleveland 56, 57 electric utilities 59 Coastal Waters 86 Emergency Planning and Com- Columbia 87 munity Right-to-Know Act communications 22, 37, 39 of 1986 102 computers 50 Emergency Response Plan 146 cybersecurity 110, 111, 114 Environmental Protection Agency cyboteurs 109 60, 73, 74, 75, 76, 83, 118, hackers 111, 112, 114 119, 120, 130 netwar 109 EPA 51, 53, 60 ComputerWorld 77, 85 Epidemiology Information Ex- Computer Technology Review change 138 116, 144 European Union 143 Contamination 46, 66, 132, 151 eWeek 110 contamination 49, 53, 54, 65 Council on Foreign Relations 140 F counter terrorism 146, 148 critical infrastructure 18, 19 Federal Bureau of Investigation Critical Infrastructure Assurance 40, 73, 75, 78, 79, 85 Office 48 Federal Computer Week 42, 104, critical points 48 105, 109, 111, 129, 130, Cryptosporidium 132 135, 137, 143, 147, 157 protozoan 132 Fire 78, 80, 81, 84 cyanide 46 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance cyberattacks 158 Act of 1978 101, 127 Page 209
  • Index K Foreign Terrorist Organizations 90, 91 Ku Klux Klan 97 forest fires 79, 80 L G Laboratories gas mask 64 epidemiology 151 respiratory protection 154 Level A laboratories 135 General Accounting Office 134 Level B laboratories 136 Glen Canyon Dam 28 Level C laboratories 136 Government Executive 101, 102, Level D laboratories 136 115, 134, 139, 140 National Laboratory System Government Executive Magazine 136 67 Los Angeles 29, 30 Grand Coulee Dam 28 Gulf War 81 M H Manhattan Project 28 Maritime Transportation Security Halifax disaster of 1917 139 Act of 2002 101, 139, 143 Hayman Fire 80 Metropolitan Water District 30 hazardous materials 47 metropolitan water districts 29 Health Alert Network 137 MSDS 61, 62 Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 117, N 118 Hickman 20, 48, 52, 54, 55 National Academy of Sciences Homeland Security Magazine 73 127 Hoover Dam 28 National Air Carrier Association 115 I National Coast Guard Act of 1999 142 Indonesia 87 auxilliarists 142, 143 ingested 52, 53, 61 National Electronic Disease Sur- inhalation 61 veillance System 137 inhaled 52 National Institute for Occupation- Interagency Fire Center 79, 81 al Safety and Health 68, International Safety Equipment 159, 160, 165 Association 133 National Institute of Chemical ISEA 133 Studies 173 Iraq 78, 81, 134 National Institute of Occupational ISAC 65 Safety and Health 62 Page 210
  • Understanding Water & Terrorosm National Plan for Information power grid 84, 85 Systems Protection - De- Power outages 56 fending America’s Cyber- Preparedness 156, 157, 159 space 2000 107 Presidental Directive 63 36 National Rural Water Associa- Presidential Decision Directive tion 82 63 73 National Strategy for Combating Presidential Directive 63 22, 118 Terrorism 18 Presidential Directive 66 107, National Strategy for Homeland 116 Security 101 President Clinton 73 National Strategy for the Physi- President Franklin Roosevelt cal Protection of Critical 132, 139 Infrastructure and Key President George W. Bush 21, Assets 23 100, 101, 121 Natural Disaster 156 Project Bioshield 104 earthquake 156 Protecting Our Water, Drinking tornado 156 Water Security in America NetworkWorld 111, 113, 117, 118 After 9/11 19, 147 New York City 29, 30, 31, 33, 83 Public Health Information Net- Nigeria 87 work 137 NIOSH 62, 68 Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness O and Response Act of 2002 74, 76, 101, 118, 119, 120 Occupational Health & Safety pump 57 Administration 155, 159 pumps 50, 51, 56 OSHA 134 pump stations 26, 37, 38 Occupational Health & Safety Magazine 133 R Offshore oil 86 oil supply 86, 88 Radio Frequency Identification Oil platforms 86, 87, 88, 89 116 loading docks 87 Reason Magazine 122 workboat 88 Right-to-Know Act 59, 60 OSHA 61, 62, 64 Rocky Mountain News 136 P S panic 55, 66 Safe Drinking Water Act 101 port 42 September 11, 2001 19, 40, 43, ports of entry 41, 147, 148 73, 76, 91, 94, 95, 96, 97, harbors 147 123, 132, 157, 160, 173 Page 211
  • Index September 11 hijackers 123 United States Air Force 108 sewage 46 United States Army Center for Sheltering in Place 171, 172 Health Promotion and Pre- Shipping 86 ventive Medicine 146 spore 55 United States Coast Guard 29, State Department 56 43, 100, 102, 103, 104, Sunni Muslim 90 105, 114, 115, 138, 139, surveillance 75, 87 141 Admiral James Coy 141 T United States Customs Service 120, 145 Technology Review 116, 127 United States Department of terrorism 48, 49, 50, 66, 67 Homeland Security 100, environmental damage 81, 86 102, 103, 105, 106, 107, Terrorism and Oil 86 110, 111, 114, 115, 116, Terrorism in the Offshore Oilfield 117, 118, 120, 128, 129, 86 130, 135, 144, 145, 155 terrorist 48, 49, 55, 56, 59, 66, Directorate 100 67, 72, 73, 75, 79, 80, 85, Tom Ridge 114 86, 88, 157 United States Department of the terrorist attack 41, 42, 156, 157, Treasury 122 158, 159, 160, 161 United States Environmental Pro- industrial materials 87 tection Agency 144 Texas City, Texas 139, 140 United States Federal Emergency The National Strategy for Home- Management Administra- land Security 19 tion 129, 145, 155, 157, threats 48, 53, 54, 65, 105 159, 168 Three Mile Island nuclear plant United States Forest Service 79 148 United States Geological Survey Timothy McVeigh 97 83 toxin 46 United States House of Represen- transportation 60 tatives 121, 128 Trauma House Judiciary Committee depression 174, 175 127 Post-traumatic stress disorder United States Power Grid 38 174 Uniting and Strengthening PTSD 174, 175, 176 America Act by Provid- Traumatic events 173 ing Appropriate Tools Tucson 29, 30 Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA U Page 212
  • Understanding Water & Terrorosm PATRIOT) Act of 2001’ weapon 46 101, 121, 124, 125, 128 weaponized 54, 55 USAF Counterproliferation Cen- World Policy Journal 139 ter 20 World Trade Center 132 World War II 79, 140, 143 V Y vandalism 38 vulnerability 18, 20, 48 Y2K 156, 158 Vulnerability Assessments 76, 146, 147 W Washington Technology 111, 114 wastewater systems 50 wastewater treatment plants 37, 52, 83 WaterWorld 65, 83, 85, 120 water districts 29, 41 Water Information Sharing and Analysis Center 74 Water ISAC 130 Water suppliers 30 water suppliers 58, 65 water supply 23, 25, 26, 28, 29, 31, 37, 38, 40, 46, 48, 49, 50, 57, 58, 66, 68 Monitoring 148 water system 49, 50, 51, 53, 55, 146, 147, 148 Water treatment facilities chlorine residual 148 color 148 conductivity 148 odor 148, 152, 153 pH 148 taste 148 turbidity 148 Water pressure 148 water treatment plants 37, 41 water utilities 65 Page 213
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the following people in my life who perservered through writing, editing and publishing this book. Two people devoted the time and effort to read and edit this edition. First and foremost is my wife Sharon, who read and edited the text several times. The second is Charles Burg, who both edited it and provided the legal advice. I also want to thank my partner, Diana Burg, of BurgYoung Publishing, who encouraged me through the entire process, as well as spending a lot of time helping with the editing and writing. Both she and her husband Charles have been very supportive of BurgYoung Pub- lishing, both creatively and financially. I also appreciate and acknowledge the people who have given me comments and reviews. This is one of the ways that an author knows the impact of a work on the reader. The reviews and comments have been an encouragement to continue this book. I would also like to give a special acknowledgement to my cousin Lynn, who went through the horror of the Sep- tember 11, 2001 attack. She typifies many Americans who show it is possible to overcome adversity and persevere. I wrote this book because I feel that our way of life de- pends upon concerned citizens being both informed and involved. Thus, I acknowledge you, the reader, for want- ing to become informed and make a difference in our world. H. Court Young Page 214
  • Understanding Water and Terrorism Page 215
  • Acknowledgments How to Contact Us: To order a copy of Understanding Water and Terrorism, please contact us at: BurgYoung Publishing, LLC 4105 E. Florida Avenue, #300 Denver, CO 80222 Phone: 1-866-411-KNOW Cell: (303) 726-8320 Fax: (303) 692-9049 Email: infowc@waterconflicts.com or infoby@burgyoungpublishing.com Web: http://www.waterconflicts.com or http://www.burgyoungpublishing.com Price per copy of Understanding Water and Terrorism,: $14.95 plus $3.75 shipping. This book is also available as a downloadable Adobe PDF or Microsoft eBook on our web sites. Page 216
  • Nature / Science Reference / Environment “There will be no quick or easy end to this conflict.” President George W. Bush February, 2003 This book will help you understand the reasons that our water supply and availability are so critical to our way of life, and how that quality of life may be threatened in the coming years by terrorists. You will discover: • Is a terrorist attack against our nation’s water system possible? • What is being done to protect this critical infrastructure? • How can you help? • Is your family safe? • How you can prepare! “It’s interesting. An easy read. Non-technical.” Robert L. Burdic, Medical Operations Analyst - Kaiser Permanente, former Medical Lab Specialist - Department of Communicable Disease & Immunology - Walter Reed Army Institute of Research. “The water and terrorism book is essential reading for survival in the 21st century. It opened my eyes to my responsibility as a member of this society and to the risks of being uninformed.” Helena Mariposa, Author and Concerned Citizen. BurgYoung Publishing LLC http://www,burgyoungpublishing.com $14.95