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2013 Social Commerce Summit- Darin Wolter
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2013 Social Commerce Summit- Darin Wolter

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Darin Wolter, Vice President of Global Sales with Sysomos presents at W2O Group's third annual Social Commerce Summit during SXSW Interactive.

Darin Wolter, Vice President of Global Sales with Sysomos presents at W2O Group's third annual Social Commerce Summit during SXSW Interactive.

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  • Introduction [set the stage with an anecdote]
  • You’re a major brand, about to embark on a much-anticipated product launch. Along the way, you’re using social intelligence to inform product development, pricing, PR and marketing. [Need to fill in narrative about the position Google was in pre-Nexus launch. How many years in the making? How much $$ invested? We need to convey the pressure, attention and high stakes of the development process and the launch. [Note: But, keep in mind, I don’t think we have permission to publicly disclose the Google relationship, so we need to keep this anonymous.]Screen responsivenessPriceScreen durability1 hand functionalityWeight concernsVoice recognition
  • The pre-launch anticipation is reaching fanatical levels – more than [share stats that show the sheer overload of online conversation].
  • It’s virtually impossible to quickly sift through that much feedback, so how do you hone in on the most valuable social commentary? The feedback that should be shared with product development … diverted to the PR team … or escalated to avoid a potential crisis? That’s the difference between big data and good data. The difference between unintelligible data and smart data. And, the difference between a social media “fan drive” and social commerce.
  • To evolve from big data to smart data, we need to solve three core challenges facing businesses today: Analysis paralysis, data inconsistencies and silo’d teams.Here’s the thing: A lack of data isn’t the problem. Rather, the biggest challenge is that there’s too much data. For example, [insert details about VISA: Monitoring for Olympics, getting set for largest global marketing event every 4 years. Thanks to smart data, they identified a crisis that has nothing to do the main focus of the monitoring. But, that’s the magic of smart data: It lets you find what you don’t know you’re looking for.]  People don’t know where to start. But, let’s be realistic. What we’re talking about isn’t rocket science … nor is it tool agnostic. With that said, we need to equip the right analysts with the best tools. Data overload is preventing companies from making decisions with confidence. The speed at which business gets done is accelerating. Real-time data is critical for executives to make real-time decisions. Companies need to cut through the noise and find actionable insights in real-time. Only then will we recover from analysis paralysis.
  • Problem solved? Not quite. Large enterprises with offices in multiple locations around the world often cite data consistency as a challenge. For example, a team in Copenhagen may use a different social platform than the team in New York, making apples-to-apples comparisons virtually impossible. On avg over 40K mentions per day reaching every corner of the world. Volume tripled during the crisis
  • We hear a lot of talk about social business – a trendy buzzword that’s easier said than done. To truly maximize the value of social across the organization, it can’t live in a vacuum. Yet, it’s common to see a community manager who collects the data but isn’t sharing analysis and insights throughout the entire organization. All of us here know that social media impacts more than just the marketing department within a company. It touches sales, customer service, product development, and many more areas. And unfortunately, the larger the organization, the more difficult it is to scale. But, it can be done. As we’ve learned from working with Coca-Cola, Unilever and IBM, companies are revolutionizing the way business gets done. [insert the IBM case study highlighting how breaking down silos drove social commerce opportunities]
  • We hear a lot of talk about social business – a trendy buzzword that’s easier said than done. To truly maximize the value of social across the organization, it can’t live in a vacuum. Yet, it’s common to see a community manager who collects the data but isn’t sharing analysis and insights throughout the entire organization. All of us here know that social media impacts more than just the marketing department within a company. It touches sales, customer service, product development, and many more areas. And unfortunately, the larger the organization, the more difficult it is to scale. But, it can be done. As we’ve learned from working with Coca-Cola, Unilever and IBM, companies are revolutionizing the way business gets done. [insert the IBM case study highlighting how breaking down silos drove social commerce opportunities]
  • But how else can you use tap into this powerful data, beyond the standard, traditional examples? As Uncle Ben told Peter Parker (for you Spiderman fans), with great power comes great responsibility. What if we could harness the power of this data not only to revolutionize business, but to make the world a better place?
  • Late last year, Kingsford Charcoal sought to identify “The Nicest Person in Social Media.” They worked with our engineering team to develop a script that identified people who tweeted the words “please,” thank you” and “thanks” most frequently in 2012. But, being nice isn’t just about please and thank you. The algorithm also accounted for people with positive sentiment scores and those who avoided “foul” language. After analyzing more than 100 billion tweets, Kingsford Charcoal and Sysomos deemed Waukesha, Wisconsin resident, IT professional, and part-time wine blogger, Clifford Brown, as 2012’s “Nicest Person in Social Media.” Clifford’s “nice score” was exceptional, thanks in part to tweeting the words “please,” “thanks” and “thank you” 1,574 times during the year – an average of 4+ times a day! Ultimately, this clever contest enabled Kingsford to promote their product during a time when many people weren’t grilling, and it provided them a way to meaningful engage with the online community in a way they’d never done before.For the nicest person in social we analyzed over 100 Billion Tweets In addition to revolutionizing the way business gets done, companies can harness this data inspire meaningful, positive change. For example, a national beauty product client that we work with wanted to help improve how women perceive themselves. An alarming number of women turn to social media to share negative self-image concerns.  Our client’s team focused on big events, such as the Oscars. When Angelina Jolie walks the red carpet, it’s normal to see a flurry of tweets from women proclaiming themselves fat compared to Ms. Jolie. The client would respond with words of affirmation and a positive message.
  • Big data shouldn’t always mean big changes, big assumptions or big revelations. Certainly, smart data paves the way for these major discoveries; however, even a seemingly small gesture – one rooted in context from data analysis – can lead to groundbreaking opportunities. And, that’s the real potential for big data.

Transcript

  • 1. DARINWOLTERExecutive Vice President,Global Sales 2013-01-15 1
  • 2. BIG DATACONFIDENTIAL 26/03/2013 2
  • 3. SPIKE ANALYSIS
  • 4. DATAFLOW
  • 5. CORECHALLENGES
  • 6. REAL TIME CRISIS MONITORING By monitoring mentions and texts analytics regularly, users are able to identify growing issues before they make headlines.March 29, 2012 March 30, 2012 March 31, 2012
  • 7. GLOBAL HEATMAP
  • 8. BREAKDOWNSILOS
  • 9. With great powercomes greatresponsibility.
  • 10. THENICESTPERSONINSOCIALMEDIA