Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Tips for Teaching an Effective Online Course (with Good 
      Student Achievement and High Student Satisfaction)   

    ...
i) Chats, especially the first chat. 
      ii) Threaded discussions (TDs).  (I have not used these 
           much excep...
make my comments, scan them and email back the 
     paper with my comments. 
e)   Consider using homework manager or simi...
n) Let students know that exams will be open book, open 
      note, but set time limits on exams after which the exams 
 ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Tips For Teaching an Effective Online Course, CAMPBELL

679

Published on

Published in: Education, Career
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
679
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
25
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Tips For Teaching an Effective Online Course, CAMPBELL"

  1. 1. Tips for Teaching an Effective Online Course (with Good  Student Achievement and High Student Satisfaction)    Michael Campbell 10‐9‐09  1) Introduction    a) A study I did demonstrated about equal learning and  student satisfaction in online and onsite sections of Acct  233 Principles of Accounting I.  b) I have taught these accounting courses online: Principles  1 & 2, Intermediate 1 and Governmental Accounting.   Student satisfaction has been high.  c) I chair the department.  We have 20 full time and 10  part‐time faculty.  I get all the student complaints.  d) The purpose of this presentation is to mention some  specific methods that have resulted in good outcomes  for student learning and student satisfaction in online  accounting courses.  e) Plan for the presentation:  Course setup, Before the  course begins, Course operation, End of course activities    2) Course setup.  Course set up is much more time consuming  for an online course.  Proper course setup can reduce  instructor time required during the course.   a) Modules and content items.  b) Use of Announcements or News items.  c) Consider a Syllabus Quiz to ensure students know the  basic “rules” of the course.  d) Personal Introduction Threaded Discussion.  e) I use two Chats – Initial and before Exam 1.  Students  really appreciate these chats.  f) Homework & solutions.  Put specifics about assignments  in only 1 place—the syllabus or course schedule.  In  content items, ask students to refer to the course  schedule for specific assignments and due dates.  This  will allow you to change assignments in only 1 place .  g) Create exams using exam pools.  h) I give Sample Exams & solutions, and students earn  points for the Sample Exams.  i) Use publishers’ online resources.  No need to duplicate  these in the course shell, e.g., narrated Ppt, Quizzes, etc.  j) Consider ways to engage students in the course. 
  2. 2. i) Chats, especially the first chat.  ii) Threaded discussions (TDs).  (I have not used these  much except for personal introductions and student  questions segregated by Chapter.)  iii) Group activities.  Consider making the group work  mandatory if you decide to use groups.  Voluntary  groups have not worked well for me.    3) Before the course begins  a) Set access dates for assignment solutions, quizzes,  exams, etc.  Hide things you don’t want students to see.  b) Send emails before the course starts with Syllabus and  homework schedule and any special information the  students may find useful before the course begins, so  there are no first day surprises.  Must use students’  preferred email addresses, since they won’t have access  to the course yet.  c) Post initial announcements/news items , e.g., “How to  take this course”, “Initial things to do”, etc., that will be  available the first day of class.  d) Depending on your system, you may be able to use  announcements from previous semesters and just set  new dates on announcements so they will appear  automatically when students are working on specific  areas or assignments.  This worked well in eCollege.    4) Course operation  a) Recognize that some students are likely to encounter a  variety of issues early in the semester, from computer  and other technical problems, to not receiving their text  book on time.  Allow flexibility early in the course.  b) Send lots of emails.  Put the course number in the  Subject area, e.g., Acct 233.  Ask your students to do the  same.  Depending on your system you may want to set  up a folder to capture these emails.  This will provide a  separate area for a record for the whole course.  c) Copy the whole class on most emails that you send,  including responses to student questions, and consider  also posting them as Announcements/News items.  d) Review some homework and provide some feedback.   Consider using a tablet PC for this.  I also print papers, 
  3. 3. make my comments, scan them and email back the  paper with my comments.  e) Consider using homework manager or similar software.   It has worked OK.  I am working on getting the import  grades feature set up.  f) Make solutions available the day after assignments are  due.  Tell students frequently that this is one method you  use to provide very detailed feedback, but it requires  some effort on their part.  g) Encourage students to call or email with questions, and  respond very quickly.  I often respond immediately.  h) Make interaction with students positive and  encouraging.  Student dissatisfaction often seems to  have resulted from the attitude or expectations of the  instructor or failure of the instructor to communicate  promptly or frequently with students.  i) Answer all student questions respectfully and  completely, even when they should know they answer.   Avoid telling students just to read the text or to read the  announcements or course syllabus.   This type of  response probably will not get the student response the  instructor wants and it may dampen students’  enthusiasm for the course and the instructor.  j) Allow flexibility, e.g., drop the lowest 3 homework  scores, quizzes, etc.  Allow people to submit assignments  late and even take exams late if they have reasonable  excuses.  k) Recognize that students may encounter a variety of  problems on exams, especially on the first exam, so be  flexible.  Let students know about possible problems and  how to handle them, e.g., a windstorm disrupts Internet  service during an exam, the Internet will time students  out after 25‐45 minutes of no activity while they are  taking an exam.  Use exam pools to create exams that  will be substantially different for each student.  l) If you are teaching an onsite section of the course, create  an exam for the onsite section by using the exam pool  created for your online course.  m) If you are concerned about cheating, consider requiring a  proctored exam, perhaps the comprehensive final exam.   Put this possibility in your course syllabus and be ready  to assist students in finding a proper proctored situation. 
  4. 4. n) Let students know that exams will be open book, open  note, but set time limits on exams after which the exams  close automatically.  Or, assess a penalty if additional  time is excessive.  Let students know the policy.   o) Consider quizzes.   Maybe use them as means to help the  students learn the material as opposed to evaluation  instruments.  Consider giving twice as much time as  necessary on the quizzes and even encouraging students  to look up answers if they need to.  p) Find ways to get students to use the learning aids at the  text publishers’ websites.  Consider some type of  incentives (points??).    5) End of course activities  a) Encourage students to complete the course assessment.   Must coordinate this with when the assessment form will  be made available to students, because they may have  only 1 opportunity to complete the course assessment.  b) Provide course‐to‐date score information well before the  final exam, so students know exactly where they stand.   May need to prepare a separate grade book in an Excel  spreadsheet to allow for dropping some of the  homework and quiz scores.  May need to email separate  Excel spreadsheets to each student to provide only his or  her information.  c) For students that do well in the course, send them an  email to let them know they did well and might want to  consider accounting or ??? as a major and offer to meet  with them to discuss it.    6) Comments  a) Create the course to make it doable for the instructor  given the available resources, constraints, enrollment,  etc.  I created a lot of work for myself this.   b) The keys are to be respectful until it hurts, respond  quickly and find ways to demonstrate that you are  actively participating in the course.  I do 2 chats, do  frequent emails and announcement posting and respond  immediately to student emails.  Other faculty do  frequent threaded discussions with feedback or do  extensive feedback on numerous assignments. 

×