VIDEO GAMES                         AS PLAY SPACE                         GENERATOR                                    Alv...
PLAY SPACES: From Then to Now                   Video games are often blamed because children chose playing them rather t...
insecurity              Parents, for variety of reasons, are frightened to have their children on the streets. They becom...
 One of the limitations of some video game is that it provides only pre-structured forms ofimagination                int...
DIAGRAM PLAY SPACES: From Then to Now                          urbanization                                      insecurit...
thanks          alvarogonzalez.mail@gmail.com                                                                             ...
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Games: Complete Freedom of Movement

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This slide I made analyze the video games as play space generators. -2011 Lecture-The Game: A powerful tool

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Games: Complete Freedom of Movement

  1. 1. VIDEO GAMES AS PLAY SPACE GENERATOR Alvaro Gonzalez Game Designer/PLAY SPACES: From Then to Now --THE GAME A POWERFUL TOOL
  2. 2. PLAY SPACES: From Then to Now  Video games are often blamed because children chose playing them rather than playing outside, when, in many cases, no such a choice is available. Play in Wild Space • Let the children modify their physical environment. • Children gain recognition from their companions for their brave, often proven through stunts. • Children make various forms of role-playing, often imitating the activities of adult males. • Play activities were seen as opportunities for social interaction and friendship. • Children enjoy freedom and autonomy because they could occupy an environment largely unsupervised by adults. • Children make undergoing active exploration unsupervised by adults. urbanization  Rapid urbanization saw the development of urban playgrounds in the midst of city streets, responding to a growing sense of children’s diminishing access to space and an increased awareness of issues of childe welfare. Play in Playground Space • Don’t let the children modify their physical environment. • Children gain recognition from their companions for their brave, often proven through stunts. • Children make various forms of role-playing, often imitating the activities of adult males. • Play activities were seen as opportunities for social interaction and friendship. • Children have pre-structured forms of interactivity and limited space always supervised by adults. • Children make undergoing active exploration supervised by adults.
  3. 3. insecurity  Parents, for variety of reasons, are frightened to have their children on the streets. They become more and more protective. Now children return from school and lock themselves in their apartments. Video games did not make backyard play space disappear: rather, they offer children some way to respond to domestic confinement. Play in Apartment Space • Don’t let the children modify their physical environment. • There is no space for children to be brave. • Children role-playing, is limited by the physical space and adult supervision. • Social interaction is difficult because children often play alone. • Children have pre-structured forms of interactivity and limited space always supervised by adults. • Children make undergoing active exploration supervised by adults.locked  Today, many of our children have access to the one to five rooms inside their apartments. Video game technologies expand their imagination. Play in Room Space • Let the children modify their physical environment. • There is no space for children to be brave. • Children role-playing, is limited by the physical space. • Social interaction is difficult because children often play alone. • Children enjoy freedom and autonomy because they could occupy an environment largely unsupervised by adults. • Children tend to be passive.
  4. 4.  One of the limitations of some video game is that it provides only pre-structured forms ofimagination interactivity, and in that sense, video games are more like playgrounds rather than wild-spaces. Play in Virtual Playground Space • Don’t let the children modify their physical environment. • Children gain recognition from their companions for their brave, often proven through stunts. • Children make various forms of role-playing, often imitating the activities of adult males. • Play activities were seen as opportunities for social interaction and friendship. • Children have pre-structured forms of interactivity and limited space unsupervised by adults. • Children make undergoing active exploration unsupervised by adults.  Today some video game are trying to escape adult intervention in shaping children’s playimagination environments. This games have tools to allow childrens to construct their own playspace and then give them the space to do what they want. This are commonly known as sandbox- games, open-world games or some type of rol playing games. Play in Virtual Wild Space • Let the children modify their physical environment. • Children gain recognition from their companions for their brave, often proven through stunts. • Children make various forms of role-playing, often imitating the activities of adult males. • Play activities were seen as opportunities for social interaction and friendship. • Children enjoy freedom and autonomy because they could occupy an environment largely unsupervised by adults. • Children make undergoing active exploration unsupervised by adults.
  5. 5. DIAGRAM PLAY SPACES: From Then to Now urbanization insecurity Play in Wild Space Play in Playground Space Play in Apartment Space locked Play in Virtual Playground Space Play in Room Space Play in Virtual Wild Space
  6. 6. thanks alvarogonzalez.mail@gmail.com Alvaro Gonzalez alvarogonzalez.skype Game Designer @WASDCtrlSPACE “I work as a Lead Game Designer and Senior Producer for the Kef Sensei game developer company, which in turn provides the wellW www.alvarogonzalez.us known international game publishers Playfirst, BigFishGames among others. I have a kin sense of effectiveness for the games I passionately www.linkedin.com/in/alvarogon design. I work writing the plot, developing the idea, and supervising the programming. I also deal with the client and respond requests. My investigative approach is the generator of thousands of very original game ideas and designs that I thoroughly carry out and put in Meet Latin American Game Developers the street with efficiency. Both Kef Sensei projects and my personal Boardgames projects are done with passion and creativity.“ meetlatinamericangamedev@gmail.com @LatAmeGameDevReferences:Rules of Play: Game Design Fundamentals, Katie Salen and Eric ZimmermanCambridge MIT Press, 2004From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games, Henry Jenkins and Justin Cassell.Boston MIT Press, 1998

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