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Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4
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Eva Anttila Embodied Knowledge And Learning For Waae Rfg4

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  • 1. Embodied knowledge and learning Eeva Anttila Theatre Academy Helsinki [email_address]
  • 2. Background <ul><li>Dualistic view: The mind and the body are seen as separate </li></ul><ul><li>As a result this Cartesian duality, the human body has been excluded from the process of knowing </li></ul><ul><li>A wide body of literature from fields of phenomenology, somatic theory and neuroscience, depicting a notion of embodied knowledge, has emerged in recent decades </li></ul><ul><li>Today, a growing number of scholars conceive the mind and the body as one </li></ul>
  • 3. Towards embodied knowing <ul><li>Disembodied knowing: based on the desire to control nature and the quest for universal reason and knowledge that transcends time and place </li></ul><ul><li>The turn to the body is a shift towards the specific and the local, a shift towards temporality and particularity </li></ul><ul><li>Seeing the body as a subject, as a vehicle for understanding brings about a shift from disembodied knowing towards embodied knowing </li></ul>
  • 4. Lakoff & Johnson (1999) <ul><li>The mind is inherently embodied </li></ul><ul><li>Our bodily and neural systems regulate the way our cognitive systems work, because the “same mechanisms that allow us to perceive and move also create our conceptual systems and modes of reason.” </li></ul><ul><li>Our conceptual systems and linguistic categories consist of metaphors that link our bodily existence with the way we think </li></ul><ul><li>For example, “understanding is grasping” ; “affection is warmth” </li></ul>
  • 5. Damasio (1994, 1999) <ul><li>Challenges the view of consciousness as predominantly linguistic and suggests that concepts consist of the nonlanguage idea of what things, actions, events, and relationships are </li></ul><ul><li>Speaks about “the feeling of knowing”: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“ The simplest form in which the wordless knowledge emerges mentally is the feeling of knowing-the feeling of what happens when an organism is engaged with the processing of an object” </li></ul></ul>
  • 6. Damasio, continued… <ul><li>Nonverbal narratives: nonlanguaged maps of logically related events, comparable to film </li></ul><ul><li>Starts as soon as we wake up </li></ul><ul><li>Images are processed in a constant flow </li></ul><ul><li>Connected to our desire to make up stories, create drama and movies, and write books </li></ul><ul><li>A sense of self is created through this process </li></ul><ul><li>A sense of self, or identity, is embodied </li></ul>
  • 7. Embodied learning <ul><li>The role of bodily experiences, including internal sensations and concrete interaction with others and the world </li></ul><ul><li>The significance of multisensory (prereflective) experiences </li></ul><ul><li>The nature of emotions as bodily processes </li></ul><ul><li>Sense of self, identity, agency </li></ul>
  • 8. Language and embodied learning <ul><li>Embodied learning does not mean learning without language </li></ul><ul><li>It is based on a conception of language as a creative, narrative, poetic and metaphoric process </li></ul><ul><li>In embodied learning anguage is more than a linear and logical cognitive process that leads to logical thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Such language is directly connected to bodily and multisensory experiences  embodied knowledge </li></ul>
  • 9. Collaboration and embodied learning <ul><li>In collaborative projects students work with each other in concrete, physical action </li></ul><ul><li>They may face conflicts, their own emotions, and others’ emotions </li></ul><ul><li>Through these experiences they can learn how deal with their emotions, communicate about their desires and views, and eventually to solve conflicts by negotiation and by respecting others’ emotions and views </li></ul><ul><li>Collaboration in learning strengthens communities, builds understanding for others and respect for diversity </li></ul><ul><li>Emphasizing collaborative learning instead of individual performance and success leads also towards contemplating ethics </li></ul>
  • 10. Aesthetics and embodied learning <ul><li>Art as a basic human necessity </li></ul><ul><li>There is an existential primacy of mental image versus thought and language </li></ul><ul><li>Imaging allows for creative interpretation of reality and this is the basis of personal identity and innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Aesthetic experiences play an important role in the relationship between human beings and the world </li></ul><ul><li>The aesthetic domain answers the needs of self-consciousness (Crowther 1993) </li></ul><ul><li>“ As we learn through in and through the arts we become more qualitatively intelligent” (Eisner 2004, 5). </li></ul>

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