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Graham Harvey Reviewing the Literature Presentation

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  • 1. Reviewing the literature: Criticalthinking and justifying your research Developing as a Researcher – the next steps PGRS Part 2 Induction, 2013 Graham Harvey Arts Faculty
  • 2. Aims and Objectives:1. To consider the purpose, value and style of literature reviews2. To consider the balance between citing existing work and “your own voice”3. To consider ways of demonstrating critical thinking
  • 3. Aims and Objectives:1. To consider the purpose, value and style of literature reviews2. To consider the balance between citing existing work and “your own voice”3. To consider ways of demonstrating critical thinkingWhat will be covered?1. The nature and role of a literature review in a PhD thesis2. Ways of citing others in the development of original research3. Ways of demonstrating critical thinking about your research and the wider academic debate which it should advance
  • 4. What is a PhD?
  • 5. 1 What is a PhD? [Marian Petre] Entering students often think of a PhD as a ‘magnum opus’, a brilliant research project culminating in a great work. This is rather a demanding model, and few students win Nobel Prizes as a result of their doctoral studies. More realistically, a PhD is research training leading to a research qualification. The PhD is a passport to a research career. There are other views of a PhD, as well. Getting a PhD can be a ‘rite of passage’, prerequisite to admission into the academic ‘tribe’. It can be a deep, specific education in a discipline, preceding a post-doctoral period of on-the-job training. It must make a contribution to knowledge, and so it can be viewed as one’s entry into the research discourse. There are certain things that you are demonstrating through your thesis: • mastery of your subject • research insight • respect for the discipline • capacity for independent research • ability to communicate results and relate them to the broader discourse. These reflect competence and professionalism, rather than greatness. Importantly, they are as much about comprehending others’ work as about doing one’s own.
  • 6. 1 What is a PhD? [Marian Petre] Entering students often think of a PhD as a ‘magnum opus’, a brilliant research project culminating in a great work. This is rather a demanding model, and few students win Nobel Prizes as a result of their doctoral studies. More realistically, a PhD is research training leading to a research qualification. The PhD is a passport to a research career. There are other views of a PhD, as well. Getting a PhD can be a ‘rite of passage’, prerequisite to admission into the academic ‘tribe’. It can be a deep, specific education in a discipline, preceding a post-doctoral period of on-the-job training. It must make a contribution to knowledge, and so it can be viewed as one’s entry into the research discourse. There are certain things that you are demonstrating through your thesis: • mastery of your subject • research insight • respectfor the discipline • capacity for independent research • ability to communicate results and relate them to the broader discourse. they are as much These reflect competence and professionalism, rather than greatness. Importantly, about comprehending others’ work as about doing one’s own.
  • 7. What is a PhD?What’s the difference between a thesis and a book?
  • 8. INTRODUCTIONCHAPTER 1 LITERATURE REVIEWCHAPTER 2 METHODOLOGY AND METHODSCHAPTER 3 THEORETICAL MODELSCHAPTER 4 PROTEST AND LIFESTYLECHAPTER 5 NETWORKSCHAPTER 6 MERGING IDENTITIESCHAPTER 7 SPIRITUALITY AND COMMUNITYCHAPTER 8 PROTEST RITUALCONCLUSIONSBIBLIOGRAPHYANNXES
  • 9. ContentsChapter 1: IntroductionSECTION I: LOCATING THE RESEARCH PROJECTChapter 2: Eco-Paganism Literature reviewChapter 3: Embodied Cognition Literature reviewChapter 4: A Theory of Embodied KnowingChapter 5: Embodied PhilosophyChapter 6: Research Design and MethodologySECTION II: FIELDWORKIntroduction: Between Protest Site and Urban Life: The Spectrum of Eco-Pagan PracticeChapter 7: “You’re not studying it – you’re living it”: An AutoethnographyChapter 8: Listening to the Threshold Brook: Urban Eco PaganismChapter 9: The Power of Place: Protest Site Eco-PaganismChapter 10: Eco-Paganism: A "sacred relationship with the world"SECTION III: CONCLUSIONChapter 11: Conclusion: Immanence and Embodiment in Eco-PaganismAPPENDICES
  • 10. Introduction The discursive context and the purpose of the study Institutional inertia and symbolic interactionism Research premise and hypothesis The purpose of the study Religious change as a social research problem Contemporary Paganism Methodology The logic of inquiry Pragmatism and the compatibility thesis Mixed methods approach1. Society, religion, and values 1.1. The social context: external influences on values The classical approaches Socio-economic context and the dynamics of value priorities Persisting cultural differences Exposure to plurality of life-worlds 1.2. Moral intuition, justification, and the use of cultural matter The broadening of social horizons and evolution of morality Cultural differences and universals The social intuition model of morality 1.3. Values as connectors in social networks The concreteness of relationships and the fluidity of networks Global networks of weak ties Summary and theoretical framework2. The Pagan survey…
  • 11. 5 Key thesis ingredients [Marian Petre, edited]A number of ingredients are essential for a satisfactory thesis:1. a thesis, i.e. one coherent overriding ‘story’ argument2. position of the research question in existing knowledge, i.e. a critical review of prior research which motivates and justifies the research question3. contribution of something new4. appropriate voice and argument, i.e. the provision of clear and explicit evidence, substantiation and chain of inference.More hangs on your ability to demonstrate intellectual maturity and critical depth (and through them to provide insight) than on the scale or scope of the research findings. A good PhD is based on an honest report of research that reflects sound practice and well- articulated critical thinking.
  • 12. 5 Key thesis ingredients [Marian Petre, edited]A number of ingredients are essential for a satisfactory thesis:1. a thesis, i.e. one coherent overriding ‘story’ argument2. position of the research question in existing knowledge, i.e. a critical review of prior research which motivates and justifies the research question3. contribution of something new4. appropriate voice and argument, i.e. the provision of clear and explicit evidence, substantiation and chain of inference.More hangs on your ability to demonstrate intellectual maturity and critical depth (and through them to provide insight) than on the scale or scope of the research findings. A good PhD is based on an honest report of research that reflects sound practice and well-articulated critical thinking.
  • 13. Literature review:Within the “one coherent overriding ‘story’ argument”and as “a critical review of prior research which motivates and justifies the research question”
  • 14. there is no such thing asdata free from interpretation Stephen Pepper (1942) World Hypothesis