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Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
Life of great scientists   by aditya
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Life of great scientists by aditya

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  1. • Thomas Alva Edison :Thomas Edison was born in Milan, Ohio, and grew up in Port Huron, Michigan. He was the seventh and last child of Samuel Ogden Edison, Jr. (1804–96, born in Marshalltown, Nova Scotia, Canada) and Nancy Matthews Elliott (1810– 1871, born in Chenango County, New York). His father had to escape from Canada because he took part in the unsuccessful Mackenzie Rebellion of 1837. Edison considered himself to be of Dutch ancestry.
  2. • In 1878, Edison formed the Edison Electric Light Company in New York City with several financiers, and the members of the Vanderbilt family. Edison made the first public demonstration of his incandescent light bulb on December 31, 1879, in Menlo Park. It was during this time that he said: "We will make electricity so cheap that only the rich will burn candles."
  3. Edison became the owner of hisMilan, Ohio, birthplace in 1906. On hislast visit, in 1923, he was shocked tofind his old home still lit by lampsand candles.Thomas Edison died of complicationsof diabetes on October 18, 1931, in hishome, "Glenmont" in Llewellyn Parkin West Orange, New Jersey, which hehad purchased in 1886 as a weddinggift for Mina. He is buried behind thehome.[
  4. • Sir Isaac Newton (25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727) was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, alchemist, and theologian, who has been "considered by many to be the greatest and most influential scientist who ever lived."
  5. • From the age of about twelve until he was seventeen, Newton was educated at The Kings School, at Grantham. In June 1661, he was admitted to Trinity College, Cambridge as a sizar – a sort of work-study role. At that time, the colleges teachings were based on those of Aristotle, but Newton preferred to read the more advanced ideas of modern philosophers, such as Descartes, and of astronomers such as Copernicus, Galileo, and Kepler. In 1665, he discovered the generalized binomial theorem and began to develop a mathematical theory that later became infinitesimal calculus. Soon after Newton had obtained his degree in August 1665, the university temporarily closed as a precaution against the Great Plague.
  6. The Calculus Priority DisputeNewton had the essence of the methods offluxions by 1666. The first to becomeknown, privately, to other mathematicians, in1668, was his method of integration by infiniteseries. In Paris in 1675 Gottfried WilhelmLeibniz independently evolved the first ideasof his differential calculus, outlined toNewton in 1677. Newton had already describedsome of his mathematical discoveries toLeibniz, not including his method of fluxions. In1684 Leibniz published his first paper oncalculus; a small group of mathematicianstook up his ideas. From 1670 to 1672, Newtonlectured on optics. He also showed that thecoloured light does not change its propertiesby separating out a coloured beam and shiningit on various objects
  7. Mechanics and gravitation• In 1679, Newton returned to his work on (celestial) mechanics, i.e., gravitation and its effect on the orbits of planets, with reference to Keplers laws of planetary motion. This followed stimulation by a brief exchange of letters in 1679–80 with Hooke, who had been appointed to manage the Royal Societys correspondence, and who opened a correspondence intended to elicit contributions from Newton to Royal Society transactions. Newtons reawakening interest in astronomical matters received further stimulus by the appearance of a comet in the winter of 1680–1681, on which he corresponded with John Flamsteed. After the exchanges with Hooke, Newton worked out a proof that the elliptical form of planetary orbits would result from a centripetal force inversely proportional to the square of the radius vector . Newton communicated his results to Edmond Halley and to the Royal Society in De motu corporum in gyrum, a tract written on about 9 sheets which was copied into the Royal Societys Register Book in December 1684.This tract contained the nucleus that Newton developed and expanded to form the Principia.
  8. • "Genius Is 1 percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration » thomas Edison thank You

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