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This is a presentation about a research project on Emerging Technologies in South African Higher Education Institutions and their impact on transforming teaching and learning. It is a description of ...

This is a presentation about a research project on Emerging Technologies in South African Higher Education Institutions and their impact on transforming teaching and learning. It is a description of the project

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  • Higher educators world-wide also tend to fall back on outmoded transmission practices in their teaching, which are out of sync with the informal learning experiences of students (Ramsden, 2011).
  • Parry, W., “School orders students to remove blogs”. USA Today, 26/10/2005. Downloaded from: http://www.usatoday.com/tech/news/techpolicy/2005-10-26-school-bans-blogs_x.htmThe over-adoption of tools can lead to what has been termed ‘creepy tree house’ syndrome (Stein 2008) when authority is seen to try and invade a young person's social space. There is strong resistance from students to universities and lecturers making formal use of social networks as this is seen as an invasion of their social space (e.g. Madge 2009). When parents and professors start inhabiting these spaces it creates a role conflict (Selwyn 2009) for students, as they struggle to know which face to present and find their communication stifled. These tools may have significant potential for learning, but students don't want them to become the next LMS: organisationally controlled, bland and singular in focus (i.e. teaching). For the teaching function of scholarship then the question is ‘How can educators utilise the potential of these tools without destroying what makes them valuable to students?’ Weller,2011:
  • The survey has involved designing and prototyping a scoping questionnaire prior to administering this to academics in all HEIs in South Africa to establish current practices regarding emergent technologies to enhance teaching and learning. The online questionnaire comprises of closed and open ended questions. The objective of the survey will be to establish the contexts and conditions that frame current practices of use of emerging technologies within South Africans HEIs.
  • An online questionnaire was sent to lecturers at HEIs in South Africa who identify themselves as engaged in innovative pedagogical practices using emerging ICTs. The following questions were addressed in the online questionnaire to participants who self-identify as using emerging ICTs to enhance their teaching and learning practices:
  • An online questionnaire was sent to lecturers at HEIs in South Africa who identify themselves as engaged in innovative pedagogical practices using emerging ICTs. The following questions were addressed in the online questionnaire to participants who self-identify as using emerging ICTs to enhance their teaching and learning practices:
  • An online questionnaire was sent to lecturers at HEIs in South Africa who identify themselves as engaged in innovative pedagogical practices using emerging ICTs. The following questions were addressed in the online questionnaire to participants who self-identify as using emerging ICTs to enhance their teaching and learning practices:

Ascilite11 presentation v bozalek slim Ascilite11 presentation v bozalek slim Presentation Transcript

  • An investigation into the use ofemerging technologies to transform teaching and learning across differently positioned higher education institutions in South Africa Vivienne Bozalek University of the Western Cape South Africa vbozalek@uwc.ac.za
  • Introduction• Background and contextualisation of the project• The research project itself• Where we are at with the project currently and future plans
  • Context - The Global Situation: The continents to scale• The land area of each territory is shown here.• The total land area of these 200 territories is 13,056 million hectares. Divided up equally that would be 2.1 hectares for each person. A hectare is 100 metres by 100 metres.• However, population is not evenly spread: Australias land area is 21 times bigger than Japans, but Japans population is more than six times bigger than Australias. Thanks to Prof Brian O’ Connell for use of this slide
  • Tertiary Education• The highest percentage of the student aged population enrolled is in Finland. Finland is 3.6 times the world average, with 140 times the chance of a tertiary education than in Mozambique.• Thanks to Prof Brian O’ Connell for use of this slide
  • 12% of the worlds populationenter tertiary education
  • 2.4% of Africans enter tertiary education
  • Research and Development Expenditure• Research and development is what scientific and technological and medical companies engage in to find new designs. This can be an expensive pursuit, given the costs of materials, machines and skilled specialists. Yet the development of a new design can bring financial rewards, as well as the benefits of developing a new medicine, gadget or piece of software.• In 2002, US$289 billion was spent on research and development in the United States; in the same year there was practically no research and development spending in Angola.
  • We live in a divided society scarred, numbed and embarrassed by extreme poverty and a devastatingly & seemingly intractable legacy of apartheid.South African education and practice is shaped by these contradictions and congruencies of underdevelopment and global competitiveness
  • World Economic Forum’s Global Competitiveness Report (Cape Times, Business Report 10 Sept 2010) Goal 2: Graduate Success &12/4/2011 achievement of Attributes
  • South African concerns in higher education• The question of how to make higher education more inclusive has been a central concern internationally over the past two decades (Drakich, Taylor & Bankier 1995). In South Africa, inclusivity has been even more of a concern since the first democratic election given the structuring of educational opportunities on the basis of race under apartheid.• South African post-apartheid policy documents, reflect an intention to embrace values such as democracy, openness and a human rights approach to education (Department of Education, 2001).• However, there remains a disjuncture between these policy intentions and the actual experiences of students and staff in the higher education sector.
  • SA concerns in higher educationThe continuing impact of apartheid-designedsegregated higher education institutions andlack of imaginative attention to issues ofdifference in teaching and learning remainsa stumbling block for achieving participatoryparity amongst students in this sector.
  • The importance of addressing the problem in the current context• The higher education sector in South Africa currently has an overall attrition rate of over 50%. The sector is only catering successfully for under 5% of the black (and coloured) age group (Scott et al., 2007)• Key factors seen to be within the higher education sector’s control are affective factors arising from institutional culture and teaching and learning processes followed in HEIs (Scott et al., 2007)• Higher education institutions themselves are also unequally placed with regard to resources and the students that they enroll (Bozalek & Boughey, forthcoming)
  • Current teaching practice in HE• Predominantly teacher centred• Lecture based• Reliance on rote learning• Transmission teaching models (Ramsden, 2011)• Use of technology often replicates traditional teaching practice: passive, teacher-centered and didactic instruction (Herrington et al. 2009)
  • What institutions are using…
  • What are students using?
  • Emerging Technologies in South African HEIs research projectInvolves the following research partners:• A group of eight differently placed HEIs in South Africa four in the Western Cape (Cape Peninsular University of Technology (CPUT), Stellenbosch University (SU), University of Cape Town (UCT) and the University of the Western Cape (UWC).• An international NGO – the Open Courseware Consortium
  • The Research Team Members (May 2011)
  • How the project is carried out• Three face-to-face meetings per year• Monthly online meetings• Google docs file for project documents• Ethics clearance with HEIs
  • Meeting in November 2011 of EmergingTechnologies Research Team- furtherincorporation of potential PhD students forproject
  • The research projectFunded by the National Research Foundation(NRF) for a period of three years• Overarching question How could qualitative outcomes in education be realised by using emerging technologies to transform teaching and learning interactions and paradigms across higher education institutions in South Africa?
  • Sub-questions addressed by the project• In what ways are emerging technologies used in innovative pedagogical practices to transform teaching and learning across South African HEIs?• What can be learnt from an in-depth examination of case studies of innovative practice in a sample of HEIs in which these emergent technologies are being used?• What are the conscious and tacit theoretical assumptions guiding higher educators teaching and learning practices?• What models of innovative theory and practice can be developed from the identification of transformative teaching and learning interactions and paradigms across the HEIs?
  • Phase 1 of Project - SurveyEthics clearanceLiterature reviews and theoretical frameworks – CHATSurvey of Emerging Technologies and Teaching and LearningPractices in SA HEIsThis survey will answer sub-question 1: In what ways areemerging technologies used in innovative pedagogicalpractices to transform teaching and learning across SouthAfrican HEIs?• Design and piloting of questionnaire (May-July 2011)• Target group: lecturers that are known to be open to/engaged with technology• Sent by email to contacts in all public HEIs institution, snowball sampling• Three parts to questionnaire – demographic, tools used, open questions re practices
  • Open ended questions answered by respondents• What is the most innovative pedagogical practice that you used recently using ICTs (in the last two years)?• What prompted you to initiate or use this pedagogical practice? (own motivation, addressing a specific problem;• Please describe your teaching context in which you used this practice (level of programme, discipline, size of class, students’ characteristics)?• Which technology/tool did you use? Please describe• How did you come to use this specific technology? (eg heard from colleagues, from workshops, from students, from international conferences) ;• What impact did it have on your teaching and the learning of your students?• Did you use other technologies?
  • Phase 2- Institutional Case Studies• In-depth case studies (at least one from each of the participating 8 institutions and 1 INGO) of innovative pedagogical practices using emergent technologies to enhance teaching and learning in South African higher education, with particular emphasis on those that would be useful and affordable in resource scarce contexts. These case studies will be used to answer the second and third research sub- questions:• What can be learnt from an in-depth examination of case studies of innovative practice in a sample of HEIs in which these emergent technologies are being used? and• What are the conscious and tacit theoretical assumptions guiding higher educators teaching and learning practices?
  • Progress of Project• Ethics clearance• Review of literature• Designed, piloted and administered questionnaire• Analysis of data• Presentation of data at two national SA conferences• One paper written and submitted to journal• Further papers and conference presentations planned• 2012 case study and involvement of new PhD students
  • See more informationon our project on our blog: http://emergingicts.blogspot.com/
  • References• Bozalek, V. & Boughey, C. (forthcoming) (Mis)Framing Higher Education in South Africa. Social Policy and Administration.• Drakich, J., Taylor, M. and Bankier, J. (1995), Academic freedom is the inclusive university. In S. Richer and L. Weir (eds), Beyond Political Correctness: Towards the inclusive university. Toronto: Toronto University Press. pp. 118-135.• Herrington, J., Herrington, A., Mantei, J., Olney, I., & Ferry, B. (2009). Using mobile technologies to develop new ways of teaching and learning. In J. Herrington, A. Herrington, J. Mantei, I. Olney, & B. Ferry (Eds.), New technologies, new pedagogies: Mobile learning in higher education (Vol. 9). Faculty of Education, University of Wollongong. Retrieved from ro.uow.edu.au/newtech• Ramsden, P. 2011. When I grow up I want to be spoon-fed. Times Higher Education. 11 August 2011• Scott, I., Yeld, N., Hendry, J. (2007) Higher Education Monitor No 6. A Case for Improving Teaching and Learning in South African Higher Education. Pretoria: Council on Higher Education.•