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  • 1. Presents
  • 2. Me v E M J U N Psun P U N Me J ME vMercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto
  • 3. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * P * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * U * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * SOLAR * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *SYSTEM * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * N * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Me * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * J ME v * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 4. * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * ** * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * Sun Mercury Venus Earth * Mars * Jupiter Saturn * Uranus Neptune Pluto END *
  • 5. SUNThe Sun is a typical star of intermediate size andluminosity. Sunlight and other radiation are produced bythe conversion of hydrogen into helium in the Sun’s hot,dense interior (see Nuclear Energy). Although this nuclearfusion is transforming 600 million metric tons of hydrogeneach second, the Sun is so massive (2 × 1030 kg, or 4.4 ×1030 lb) that it can continue to shine at its presentbrightness for 6 billion years. This stability has allowed lifeto develop and survive on Earth. For all the Sun’ssteadiness, it is an extremely active star. On its surface,dark sunspots bounded by intense magnetic fields comeand go in 11-year cycles and sudden bursts of chargedparticles from solar flares can cause auroras and disturbradio signals on Earth. A continuous stream of protons,electrons, and ions also leaves the Sun and moves outthrough the solar system.This solar wind shapes the ion tails of comets and leavesits traces in the lunar soil, samples of which were broughtback from the Moon’s surface by piloted United StatesApollo spacecraft .The Sun’s activity also influences theheliopause, a region of space that astronomers believemarks the boundary between the solar system andinterstellar space. The heliopause is a dynamic region thatexpands and contracts due to the constantly changingspeed and pressureVenus solar wind. In November 2003 a Sun Mercury of the Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 6. NASA/Science Source/Photo Researchers, Inc.MercuryMicrosoft ® Encarta ® 2008. © 1993-2007 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved. MeMercury orbits closer to theSun than any other planet,making it dry, hot, and virtuallyairless. Although the planet’scratered surface resemblesthat of the Moon, it is believedthat the interior is actuallysimilar to Earth’s, consistingprimarily of iron and otherheavy elements. Thiscomposite photograph wastaken in 1974 by Mariner 10,the first probe to studyMercury in detail.. Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 7. VenusVenus is the brightest object in our sky,after the sun and moon. Swirling cloudsof sulfur and sulfuric acid obscure vVenus’s surface and inhibited study ofthe planet from Earth untiltechnology permitted space vehicles,outfitted with probes, to visit it. Theseprobes determined that Venus is thehottest of the planets, with a surfacetemperature of about 460° C (about860° F). Scientists believe that agreenhouse effect causes the extremetemperature, hypothesizing that theplanet’s thick clouds and denseatmosphere trap energy from the sun Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 8. EarthAn oxygen-rich and protectiveatmosphere, moderate temperatures,abundant water, and a varied chemical Ecomposition enable Earth to supportlife, the only planet known to harborlife. The planet is composed of rock andmetal, which are present in moltenform beneath its surface. The Apollo 17spacecraft took this snapshot in 1972 ofthe Arabian Peninsula, the Africancontinent, and Antarctica (most of thewhite area near the bottom). Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 9. MarsThe most detailed information availableabout Mars has come from unpilotedspacecraft sent to the planet by the United MStates. From this data, scientists havedetermined that the planet’s atmosphereconsists primarily of carbon dioxide, withsmall amounts of nitrogen, oxygen, watervapor, and other gases. Because theatmosphere is extremely thin, dailytemperatures can vary as much as 100 Celsiusdegrees (190 Fahrenheit degrees). In general,surface temperatures are too cold andsurface pressures too low for water to exist ina liquid state on Mars. The planet resembles acold, high-altitude desert. Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 10. Jupiter and itsMoonsJupiter is the largest of theplanets, with a volume morethan 1,300 times greater Jthan that of Earth. Jupiter’scolorful bands are caused bystrong atmospheric currentsand accentuated by a densecloud cover. The massiveplanet, upper right, is shownhere with its four largestsatellites: Io, upper left,Ganymede, lower left,Europa, center, and Callisto,lower right. Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 11. SaturnSaturn,distinguished by itsrings, is the secondlargest planet in thesolar system. Thisprocessed HubbleSpace Telescopeimage shows theplanet’s cloud bands,storms, and rings asthey would appearto the human eye.Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 12. Uranus UUranus’s blue-green colorcomes from the methane gaspresent in its cold, clearatmosphere. The darkshadings at the right edge ofthe sphere correspond to theday-night boundary on theplanet. Beyond this boundary,Uranus’s northern hemisphereremains in a four-decade-longperiod of darkness because ofthe way the planet rotates.Scientists compiled this viewof Uranus from imagesreturned from Voyager 2 in1986, when the probe was 9.1million km (5.7 million mi)away from the planet. Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 13. NeptuneThis image of Neptune, taken Nby the Voyager 2 spacecraft,shows the planet’s mostprominent features. Thelarge, dark oval surroundedby white clouds near theplanet’s equator is the GreatDark Spot, a storm similar toJupiter’s Great Red Spot. Thesmaller dark oval with abright core below and to theright of the Great Dark Spotis another storm known asDark Spot 2.Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 14. Pluto CreditsPluto is farther from theSun than the major planets Pin the solar system,although it occasionallymoves in closer thanNeptune due to an irregularorbit. The small, rocky, andcold world takes 247.7years to revolve around theSun. This artists renditiondepicts Pluto, foreground;its moon, Charon,background; and the distantSun, upper right.Sun Mercury Venus Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus Neptune Pluto END
  • 15. END