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Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
Small Biz Survey Presentation
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Small Biz Survey Presentation

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Vistaprint's small business marketing survey results.

Vistaprint's small business marketing survey results.

Published in: Business, News & Politics
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  • 1. VistaprintSmall Business Survey<br />
  • 2. Page 2<br />Project Objectives<br />Assess the overall importance of marketing to small businesses<br />Understand what marketing tools small business owners are currently using, and which tools they plan to or would like to use in the future<br />Gauge marketing spend in 2009 vs. 2008, and what tools small businesses are using more (or less) of because of the downturn<br />Measure marketing budget and time spent<br />
  • 3. Page 3<br />Survey Methodology<br />300 respondents<br />5-minute online survey<br />To qualify, respondents must self-report as either a sole proprietor, independent contractor, owner or general manager of a business with less than 100 full- or part-time employees<br />
  • 4. Page 4<br />Respondent Base<br /> 300 individuals are represented in the Small Business Survey<br /><ul><li>54% male / 46% female
  • 5. 73% of respondents are over 45 years old</li></ul>Of the total sample, 56% work for a business with only one employee; 35% with 2-10 employees; 9% with 10+ employees <br /><ul><li>The mean company size in the 2-10 employees segment is 4 employees; mean in the 10+ employee segment is 33 employees. </li></ul>Respondents’ small businesses are 13 years old, on average<br />
  • 6. Page 5<br />Small Businesses’ Marketing<br />
  • 7. Page 6<br />Half of small business decision-makers consider marketing a major success factor, but over half have a marketing budget of &lt; $500<br /><ul><li>About a quarter of these small businesses have marketing budgets of $1000 or more
  • 8. 17% of small businesses feel that marketing is the major success factor, while a third feel that marketing is not a major success factor</li></ul>2008 Marketing Budget<br />Overall, How Important is the Marketing of Your Business?<br />
  • 9. Page 7<br />Marketing budget is positively correlated with business size<br />Though the majority of small businesses have a budget of less than $500, over 40%spend more<br />10+ employee businesses are significantly more likely to have a marketing budget over $2500<br /><ul><li>By contrast, single employee businesses are significantly more likely to have a marketing budget between $0 - $499</li></ul>What Was Your Total Marketing Budget for 2008?<br />CD<br /> A = Total Sample<br /> B = One Employee<br /> C = 2-10 Employees<br /> D = 10+ Employees<br />BC<br />D<br />B<br />B<br />B<br />ABC Significantly higher/lower than corresponding row at 95% confidence level<br />
  • 10. Page 8<br />Decision-makers in larger companies are particularly likely to consider marketing important to the success of their businesses<br /><ul><li>88% of small businesses with 10+ employees consider the marketing of their business either the major success factor or a major success factor
  • 11. By contrast, 41% of single employee businesses feel the marketing of their business is not a major success factor</li></ul>Overall, How Important is the Marketing of Your Business?<br />B<br />BC<br />ABC Significantly higher/lower than corresponding row at 95% confidence level<br />
  • 12. Page 9<br />Small business decision-makers spend an average of four hours per week on marketing and advertising<br />Decision-makers in small businesses with fewer employees tend to spend less time and money on marketing and advertising <br /><ul><li>Decision-makers in single employee small businesses spend an average of 3 hours per week on marketing/advertising
  • 13. Decision-makers managing 10+ employees spend almost 7 hours per week on marketing/advertising</li></ul>On Average, How Many Hours Per Week Do You Spend on Marketing/ Advertising?<br />SB Average: 4.1 hours<br />BC<br />ABC Significantly higher/lower than corresponding row at 95% confidence level.<br />
  • 14. Page 10<br />Email marketing is the most commonly used marketing tactic among small businesses in general<br /><ul><li>Social media seems to be a planned “next step” for many, while direct marketing (online and print) has a relatively high dropout rate
  • 15. Understanding why postcard/catalog marketing has a high dropout rate could help Vistaprint offer new solutions</li></ul>Do You Use the Following Marketing Devices?<br />In the past, but not currently<br />No, but plan to in the next 12 months<br />Yes, currently<br />
  • 16. Page 11<br />Almost a third of 10+ employee businesses plan to try TV/radio/print advertising in the next year<br /> A = One Employee<br /> B = 2-10 Employees<br /> C = 10+ Employees<br /><ul><li>Online/paid search and social media also seem to be areas of interest.</li></ul>Do You Use the Following Marketing Devices?<br />Yes, currently<br />In the past, but not currently<br />No, but plan to in the next 12 months<br />Email Marketing to<br />Customers/ Prospects<br />Yellow Pages<br />Social Online Media<br />(Facebook, Linkedin,<br />Twitter)<br />Electronic/ Online/<br />Paid Search Ads<br />Postcard Marketing, <br />Catalogs, etc.<br />TV, Radio, and/ or<br />Traditional Print Media<br />Significantly higher than corresponding rows at 95% confidence level.<br />
  • 17. Page 12<br />Only 38% of small businesses have websites; likelihood to have one increases with business size<br />Small businesses with 10+ employees are significantly more likely to have websites<br /><ul><li>Only 28% of single employee small businesses have a website</li></ul>Small businesses with marketing budgets less than $500 are significantly less likely to have a website, perhaps due to perceived or actual cost barriers<br />Companies who expect to spend more on marketing in 2009 vs. 2008 are significantly more likely to have a website<br />Does Your Small Business Currently Have a Website? (% Yes)<br />AB<br />A<br />SB Average: 38%<br />ABC Significantly higher/lower than corresponding row at 95% confidence level.<br />
  • 18. Page 13<br /><ul><li>While no marketing tactic stands out as being overwhelmingly important, certain tactics are seen as more important than others by specific types of SB decision-makers
  • 19. Respondents with a marketing budget over $2500 are more likely to consider TV/radio/print media most important (20%)
  • 20. SB decision-makers who believe that marketing is the major success factor for their businesses are more likely to feel that online advertising/paid search is most important (20%)
  • 21. Unsurprisingly, under-30 SB decision-makers are more likely to think that social online media is most important (33% - caution: very small #)</li></ul>Small businesses see direct email marketing to customers/ prospects as their most important marketing tool<br />Which Marketing Tactic is Most Important to Your Business?<br />
  • 22. Page 14<br />Almost half of small business decision-makers report testing their marketing campaigns<br /><ul><li>Single employee businesses are significantly less likely to test their marketing campaigns – only 36% report testing
  • 23. Additionally, companies with marketing budgets of less than $500 are significantly less likely to test their marketing campaigns
  • 24. Decision-makers who believe that marketing is not a major success factor are also less likely to test</li></ul>When You Engage in Marketing Campaigns, Do You Test the Results to Determine What Is and Isn’t Working?<br />Significant Difference within Group ABC. Upper case at 95%<br />
  • 25. Page 15<br />1/3 of SMB decision-makers look to the Internet for information about marketing<br /><ul><li>Though almost half of the small business decision-makers say that they don’t regularly seek counsel on the topic, the internet and other SBs are the most common sources of marketing information
  • 26. “Other” sources of knowledge/ counsel about marketing include ad agencies, networking groups and customers</li></ul>Who Do You Regularly Seek Knowledge or Counsel From with Regards to Marketing Campaigns and Efforts?<br />
  • 27. Page 16<br />The recession has led small businesses to increase their use of the marketing technique they see as most important – direct email<br /><ul><li>Although the majority of small business decision-makers are not increasing their marketing budgets during the recession, over 20% of respondents are increasing their use of direct email marketing campaigns</li></ul>What methods of marketing have you used (more) because of the recession?<br />
  • 28. Page 17<br />Small businesses would most like to spend additional money and time building their company websites<br />Which of the Following Would You Do More of if You Had More Money/ Time to Spend?<br />If more time<br />If more money<br />
  • 29. Page 18<br />Small business decision-makers would do more traditional and direct marketing if they had more money to spend<br />Social media is seen as more of a time issue than a money issue<br />Which of the Following Would You Do More of if You Had More Money/ Time to Spend?<br />One Employee<br />2-10 Employees<br />10+ Employees<br />Building Company Website<br />Social Online Media (Facebook, Twitter, Blogging)<br />Email Marketing to Customers/ Prospects<br />Postcard Marketing, Catalogs, etc.<br />Electronic/ Online/ Paid Search Advertising<br />TV, Radio, and/ or Traditional Print Media<br />Yellow Pages<br />None of the Above<br />If more time<br />If more money<br />
  • 30. Page 19<br />Summary and Implications<br />
  • 31. Page 20<br />Summary and Implications<br />Small businesses are using more direct email marketing because of the recession – since direct email is also seen as the “most important” marketing tool small businesses use, it may be that small businesses are shifting rather than cutting marketing investment<br />Small businesses are interested in testing their marketing efforts – about half are doing so now<br />When small businesses look for information about marketing, many look online<br />About a third of small businesses would spend more time and money on building websites if they could<br />Only 38% of small businesses have a website currently<br />About a third of small businesses would spend more time and money on building websites if they could<br />Small businesses with 10+ employees tend to spend more money and time on marketing, use more marketing tools, and think of marketing as more important than businesses with fewer employees<br />

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