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VRA 2013 Digital Humanities, Taormina
 

VRA 2013 Digital Humanities, Taormina

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Presented by John Taormina at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 3rd - April 6th, 2013, in Providence, Rhode Island. ...

Presented by John Taormina at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 3rd - April 6th, 2013, in Providence, Rhode Island.

Session #12: Making the Digital Humanities Visual: Opportunities and Case Studies
ORGANIZER/MODERATOR: Sarah Christensen, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
PRESENTERS:
John Taormina, Duke University
Sarah Christensen, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Massimo Riva, Brown University
Endorsed by the Education Committee

The digital humanities are shaping the way that scholars teach and perform research, providing them with tools to answer existing research questions or to pioneer new approaches in their respective fields. This session seeks to explore opportunities in which visual resources professionals can contribute to or initiate digital humanities projects, utilizing specialized knowledge in visual media to form new partnerships with interdisciplinary collaborators.

John Taormina from Duke University will speak about his experience as part of a discussion group called “Digital Technologies and the Visual Arts: Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital Age,” which addressed new media technologies in art history research and teaching with a focus on digital literacy, pedagogy, and scholarly viability. The group met for two years and gained interest from faculty and staff from across campus, and resulted in a week long workshop that has now been offered both at Duke and at Venice International University.

Sarah Christensen from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign will discuss “Explore CU,” an Omeka based mobile app developed by researchers at Cleveland State University. The mobile app and accompanying Omeka site aims to curate the art, culture, and history of Champaign-Urbana through community contributed content.

Massimo Riva, Director of the Virtual Humanities Lab at Brown University, will present the Garibaldi Panorama Project. This project is a “digital archive that seeks to provide a comprehensive resource for the interdisciplinary study and teaching of the life and deeds of one of the protagonists of the Italian unification process (1807-1882), against the historical backdrop of 19th-century Europe, reconstructed with the help of materials from special collections at the Brown University libraries. The project will devote particular attention to the way Garibaldi’s figure, his actions and the Italian Risorgimento as a whole were portrayed in contemporary media.”


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    VRA 2013 Digital Humanities, Taormina VRA 2013 Digital Humanities, Taormina Presentation Transcript

    • Digital Technologies and the Visual ArtsReconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeJohn J. Taormina • Duke UniversityVRA 2013
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsColloquium 2009-10, 2010-116 Original Co-conveners:• Rachel Brady (computer science: visualization)• Caroline Bruzelius (art and architectural history: medieval)• Sheila Dillon (art history/archaeology: classical)• Mark Olson (visual studies: new media)• Raquel Salvatella de Prada (visual arts: computer graphics)• John Taormina (visual resources: image management)
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsColloquium 2009-10, 2010-11Mission of Colloquium:Expand and develop our collaborations, conversations, andreflections on the implication of new technologies for thefield of material culture. The colloquium theme would focuson rethinking teaching with new technologies in bothundergraduate and graduate programs.
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsLogistics• Franklin Humanities Institute (FHI) Discussion Group Grants• Group met every two weeks at lunchtime• University faculty, staff, and students were often invited• Outside speakers for public lectures and group discussions• A number of themes for discussion were decided early on
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsInvited Guests• Faculty and graduate students from Art, Art History & VisualStudies and Classical Studies• Deputy director of IT in Duke Libraries• Fine arts librarian, GIS librarian• Scholarly communication officer in Duke Libraries
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsInvited Guests• University’s digital strategist• Computer scientists from Visualization Technology Group• Editor of Duke Press• Faculty from University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, NC StateUniversity, and NC Central University
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsPublic LecturesMaurizio Forte, University of California-Merced (now at Duke)“Experiencing the Past: Cyber-Heritage, Research and Education”
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsPublic LecturesArnie Flatten, Coastal Carolina University“Pixels, Paint and Pylons: Integrating Teaching, Technology andTraining in Art History”
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsSpring 2009: Wired! New Representational Technologies forHistorical Materials• Precipitated applicationfor FHI Discussion Group Grant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
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the Past2009 Course Project: Classical (Instr: Sheila Dillon)“Reconstructing the Past: The Statue Landscape of the HadrianicBaths at Aphrodisias”—Elizabeth Baltes, Umberto Plaja, Akara Lee, Catherine Stanley
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the Past2009 Course Project: Medieval (Instr: Caroline Bruzelius)“San Francesco a Folloni, Campania, Italy”—Michal Kosinski and Rebecca Wood
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsTechnologies + Humanities• Training and assumptions about how knowledge is organizedand taught are being shattered by the possibilities of newtechnologies• The evolution of a site/building could be represented over time• Topics could be taught in new and more effective ways• Potential of new technologies to communicate scholarlyresearch
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsTechnologies + Humanities• Student acquire new technical skills while engaging withprimary research materials to create new interpretations ofthe data• By engaging in hands-on reconstructions of a site/building,students become active rather than passive learners
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsDuke Visual Studies Initiative (2007-2012)“Visual Studies at Duke operates at the interface ofscience, social sciences, and the humanities.”
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsTopics Considered for Discussion• Digital literacy• Pedagogical practices• Spatial history (movement through time)• Evidence and attribution• Learning the technical tools• Participatory learning
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsTopics Considered for Discussion (continued)• Public colloquia• Entertainment vs. scholarship• Collaborative teaching and research vs. single engagement• Presentation of the product• Scholarly validity and viability
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsYear 1: Final Topics for Discussion• Digital literacy (fall)• Pedagogy (winter)• Scholarly viability (spring)
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsDigital LiteracyIn attendance:• Co-conveners• Computer science faculty who teach in Information Science +Information Studies (ISIS) Program• Deputy director of IT in Duke Libraries
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsDigital Literacy (continued)• What level of competence and/or understanding of theoriesbehind the tools is required?• Is there a specific set of skills we can identify that we wantstudents to have?
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsDigital Literacy (continued)• Mapping: Google Maps, Google Earth• Timeline: Flash, Final Cut, AfterEffect• 2D: layer-based software, Photoshop, Illustrator, Sketch-Up,coloring and modeling softare• 3D: SecondLife, Croquet, VirTour, Sketch-Up, Maya, AutoCad,Foto-3D
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsPedagogyIn attendance:• Co-conveners• Faculty and students from Art, Art History & Visual Studies andClassical Studies• Scholarly communication officer from Libraries• Fine arts librarian
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsPedagogy (continued)• The “transparency of digital constructions”• What is the evidence? How can it be displayed?• What are the aesthetic issues?• Citation and the nature of evidence and display• Spatial history and archaeography: transparent, documented, andscholarly viable new medium• Building in interactivity and its implications
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsPedagogy (continued)Working with different media requires different tools:• Sculpture, in situ or displaced (placement, modeling, coloration)• Architecture (reconstruction, depicting change over time)• Painting (in situ frescoes, altarpieces)• Cities/urbanism/urban spaces (mapping)
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsPedagogy (continued)• How to solve training issues:—Baseline set of IT skills and literacy—Build an online repository of discipline-specific tutorials thatintegrate with other training modules such as Lynda.com—Public workshops• Equilibrium between traditional learning (chronology, style, theory)and what is possible with new media technologies
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsScholarly ViabilityIn attendance:• Co-conveners• Other faculty and students (from Duke, UNC-CH, NCSU, NCCU)• University’s digital strategist• Editor of Duke Press• Scholarly communication officer from Libraries
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsScholarly Viability (continued)• Can digital projects be considered for tenure and promotion?• Is there an expectation that they are ancillary to the writtendocument?• What is a “good” product?• Issues around “collaborative work” for tenure and promotion• Scholarly communication and new media journals
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual Arts2013: Wired! Visualizing the Pastwww.dukewired.orgOriginal Wired! Group:Rachel Brady, Caroline Bruzelius, SheilaDillon, Raquel Salvatella de Prada, MarkOlson
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the Past“On with Their Heads: Creation, Destruction andRecontextualization”—Iara Dundas, Elizabeth Narkin, Tim Prizer
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the Past
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the PastThe Wired! Group is committed to engaging digitaltechnologies in courses and long-term researchinitiatives, training students at all levels in order to askresearch questions about material culture in the man-madeenvironment. Our courses fuse technologies with the studyof sculpture, architecture, urbanism, and painting in order toprepare our students for the 21st century.
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the PastWired! is also committed to communicating researchknowledge to a broad public. Our integration ofvisualization technologies into the regular curriculumrepresents structural and systemic change in the wayknowledge is interrogated in teaching and research.
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsWired! Visualizing the PastWired! projects fuse questions in the Humanities (astraditionally construed) with social, economic, and politicalissues. Our work engages the viewer in novel ways thatrevolutionize the role of learning in relation to thepublic. We are committed to making scholarship availableand engaging to a broad audience.
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsThe Wired! Lab• Half million dollar grant from theOffice of the Provost• Lab, hardware and software,one IT support staff person• Opened November 2011
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsThe Wired! Lab
    • Reconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeDigital Technologies and the Visual ArtsThe Wired! Lab
    • Digital Technologies and the Visual ArtsReconfiguring Knowledge in the Digital AgeJohn J. Taormina • Duke UniversityVRA 2013