Curating QuestionsBuilding a Collection of Image-Based Art        History Exam Questions            Alex Nichols      Mich...
Q: In a large class, with limitedresources, how do you:•   Create meaningful assessments?•   Grade them efficiently?•   Mi...
Q: In a large class, with limitedresources, how do you:•   Create meaningful assessments?•   Grade them efficiently?•   Mi...
LON-CAPA testing features:•   Communal banks of individual resources    (questions, images, metadata)•   Resources can be ...
Positives•   Makes generating image-based    assessments easier in the long run•   Promotes resource-sharing among faculty...
Negatives•   Large time investment up front•   Steep learning curve for coding questions•   No established Art History res...
Going Forward•   Continue support as long as faculty are    interested•   Expand to one or more additional courses•   Expl...
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions
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VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions

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Presented by Alex Nichols at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Session: Visual Literacy Case Studies


The term “visual literacy” was first coined in 1969 by Jack Debes of Kodak, co-founder of the International Visual Literacy Association. According to the Association of College and Research Libraries “Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,” visual literacy “is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.”
The three case studies in this session will explore (1) implementing visual literacy standards and guidelines at Lewis & Clark College, (2) visual literacy among library and information science students at Wayne State University, and (3) curating and building a collection of image-based art history exam questions at Michigan State University.

MODERATOR: John Taormina, Duke University

PRESENTERS:
• Joan Beaudoin, Wayne State University
“A Case Study of Visual Literacy Among Library and Information Science Students.”
• Stephanie Beene, Lewis & Clark College
“Implementing Visual Literacy Standards and Guidelines at Lewis & Clark.”
• Alex Nichols, Michigan State University
“Curating Questions: Building a Collection of Image-Based Art History Exam Questions.”

Published in: Education, Career
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VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, Curating Questions

  1. 1. Curating QuestionsBuilding a Collection of Image-Based Art History Exam Questions Alex Nichols Michigan State University
  2. 2. Q: In a large class, with limitedresources, how do you:• Create meaningful assessments?• Grade them efficiently?• Minimize the potential for cheating?
  3. 3. Q: In a large class, with limitedresources, how do you:• Create meaningful assessments?• Grade them efficiently?• Minimize the potential for cheating?A: Expand the function of the VR Collection to include dynamic functions for testing and study.
  4. 4. LON-CAPA testing features:• Communal banks of individual resources (questions, images, metadata)• Resources can be shared across multiple exams, courses, instructors, institutions• Resources within one exam can be randomized
  5. 5. Positives• Makes generating image-based assessments easier in the long run• Promotes resource-sharing among faculty (maybe)• Limits potential for cheating• Expands utility of the VR database
  6. 6. Negatives• Large time investment up front• Steep learning curve for coding questions• No established Art History resource bank
  7. 7. Going Forward• Continue support as long as faculty are interested• Expand to one or more additional courses• Explore tighter integration with MDID• Try more advanced features (free text answers, answers contained within images, etc.)
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