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VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, A Case Study of Visual Literacy
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VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, A Case Study of Visual Literacy

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Presented by Joan Beaudoin at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. …

Presented by Joan Beaudoin at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Session: Visual Literacy Case Studies


The term “visual literacy” was first coined in 1969 by Jack Debes of Kodak, co-founder of the International Visual Literacy Association. According to the Association of College and Research Libraries “Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,” visual literacy “is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.”
The three case studies in this session will explore (1) implementing visual literacy standards and guidelines at Lewis & Clark College, (2) visual literacy among library and information science students at Wayne State University, and (3) curating and building a collection of image-based art history exam questions at Michigan State University.

MODERATOR: John Taormina, Duke University

PRESENTERS:
• Joan Beaudoin, Wayne State University
“A Case Study of Visual Literacy Among Library and Information Science Students.”
• Stephanie Beene, Lewis & Clark College
“Implementing Visual Literacy Standards and Guidelines at Lewis & Clark.”
• Alex Nichols, Michigan State University
“Curating Questions: Building a Collection of Image-Based Art History Exam Questions.”

Published in: Education, Technology

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  • Using purposeful sampling – so I am asking particular participants because I wanted to look as specific groups of people – in this case faculty who teach archaeology or art history snowball or chain method of recruitment - asked individuals known to me to contact other professionals who might be interested in participating
  • Transcript

    • 1. A Case Study of Visual Literacyamong Library and Information Science Students Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin Assistant Professor School of Library & Information Science Wayne State University
    • 2. Overview• Background• Questions• Methods• Findings• Conclusion 2
    • 3. Background• Who?• What?• When?• Why? 3
    • 4. Virtual Motor City• Detroit News’ photographic negative archive• Subset digitized and made freely available 4
    • 5. Research Questions• RQ1: What activities increase visual literacy in the areas of image description and analysis?  What assignments, resources and lecture content increase visual literacy competencies?• RQ2: How do students’ perceive their learning process?  How can their visual literacy learning be supported? 5
    • 6. Methods: Participants• 31 MLIS students at Wayne State University – Enrolled in Digital Libraries course• Course conducted asynchronously online – Recorded lectures of slides with audio & video• Prerequisite courses include – Intro to profession – Intro to reference – Information organization – Information technology 6
    • 7. Methods: Data Collection• Qualitative study – Examines students’ understanding of, and affective responses to, image metadata creation• Data collection – Image records – Blog reflections• Collected at three points – At start of course – Midpoint (quality control) – At end of course 7
    • 8. Methods: Data Collection & Analysis• Image records -> Excel Spreadsheets – Descriptive statistics • Which fields were changed most often • Which version was most often changed – Case ordered displays • Compared changes in data• Blog entries -> Word documents – Thematic analysis • Constant-comparative method 8
    • 9. Methods: Exercise 1• Assigned week 1• Student assigned 10 to 30 images – Spreadsheet of data – Link to record• Exercise provides – Basic concepts – Reference resources – LCSH, AAT, TGN, etc. 9
    • 10. Methods: VMC Record Example 10
    • 11. Methods: Exercise 2• Assigned week 8• Another student reviews – Exercise 1 spreadsheet• Quality control• Course content to date – Information organization – Metadata – Usability – Evaluation in DLs – Selection – Project management 11
    • 12. Methods: Exercise 3• Assigned week 13• Original student – Re-examines their own Exercise 1 spreadsheet – Asked to add/change anything needing additional work 12
    • 13. Findings: Spreadsheets• Most often modified (added or changed) fields – Title, LCSH, tags, description – ~60% of modifications in Ex. 3• Majority of changes consisted of: – Capitalization, spelling, punctuation, language – More detail added 13
    • 14. Findings: Spreadsheets Title Ex. 1 - View of two girls. Ex. 2 - View of two girls on the steamship Tashmoo. Ex. 3 - View of two girls waving to the steamship Tashmoo. 14
    • 15. Findings: SpreadsheetsLC Subject Headings:Ex. 1 Gar Wood Orlin Johnson BoatsEx. 2 Wood, Gar Johnson, Orlin Miss America VII (Motorboats)Ex. 3 Same as 2 - should have been:Wood, Garfield Arthur, 1880-1971 15
    • 16. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools – Resources – Time – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 16
    • 17. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources – Time – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 17
    • 18. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies Resources - access and availability – Time – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 18
    • 19. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability Time - need more, better management – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 19
    • 20. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management Data - previous entries – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 20
    • 21. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries Loss - destruction• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 21
    • 22. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries – Loss - destruction• Internal issues Knowledge - own limitations – Experience – Courage 22
    • 23. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries – Loss - destruction• Internal issues – Knowledge - own limitations Experience - cataloging and images – Courage 23
    • 24. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries – Loss - destruction• Internal issues – Knowledge - own limitations – Experience - cataloging and images Courage - confidence in their own abilities 24
    • 25. Findings: BlogConfidence (1)• Lowest when changing existing data “I suddenly felt very overwhelmed and under-qualified to work on this exercise. … I found myself faced with a dilemma ... am I fixing things or am I making them all horribly, horribly wrong?” [Student 25]• Tied to critical nature of description “Weight of knowing that your eyes might be the last ones to see an item before it goes live.” [Student 9] “[I]f the data is inaccurate, one might create user dissatisfaction and a bad reputation.” [Student 8] 25
    • 26. Findings: BlogConfidence (2)• For some it increased across exercises “This exercise showed me the importance of coming back to materials with fresh eyes and a deeper level of experience … I didn’t find many errors, but I did feel a lot more confident in the revision process.” [Student 9]• For others it was a struggle “I am not fully satisfied with my results because I would have liked to have more time to research all of the images in order to provide more thorough annotations.” [Student 13] 26
    • 27. Findings: BlogWhat they felt they learned• “My view of descriptive cataloging has changed in the sense that I now realize just how hard it is.” [Student 13]• “I learned from these exercises that I probably need to reign that in a bit. I was probably starting to put things into the metadata that was really just a guess, rather than accurate. Taking the time to research is great, but putting in inaccurate data is not. Take your time, be accurate, and be honest when you dont know.” [Student 25] 27
    • 28. Conclusions• The exercises increased students’ visual literacy – However, increase was minimal • Need for one-on-one guidance – Students were more aware of the challenges involved in describing images• The students experienced a great deal of frustration during the exercises – Methods of increasing the fun factor • Enjoyed the detective work 28
    • 29. Future Work• Continue the study with modifications: – Provide one on one feedback about their work – Provide students with framework for analyzing picture content – Find additional exercises that help with using controlled vocabularies – Interview highly effective students• Develop guidelines on how to increase visual literacy skills among individuals who describe images 29
    • 30. Thank you• Comments or questions?• Joan E. Beaudoin• Contact me: ee4525@wayne.edu 30
    • 31. 31