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A Case Study of Visual Literacyamong Library and Information Science Students                                     Dr. Joan...
Overview•   Background•   Questions•   Methods•   Findings•   Conclusion                            2
Background•   Who?•   What?•   When?•   Why?                         3
Virtual Motor City• Detroit News’ photographic negative archive• Subset digitized and made freely available               ...
Research Questions• RQ1: What activities increase visual literacy in  the areas of image description and analysis?   What...
Methods: Participants• 31 MLIS students at Wayne State University  – Enrolled in Digital Libraries course• Course conducte...
Methods: Data Collection• Qualitative study  – Examines students’ understanding of, and    affective responses to, image m...
Methods: Data Collection & Analysis• Image records -> Excel Spreadsheets  – Descriptive statistics     • Which fields were...
Methods: Exercise 1• Assigned week 1• Student assigned 10  to 30 images  – Spreadsheet of data  – Link to record• Exercise...
Methods: VMC Record Example                              10
Methods: Exercise 2• Assigned week 8• Another student  reviews  – Exercise 1 spreadsheet• Quality control• Course content ...
Methods: Exercise 3• Assigned week 13• Original student  – Re-examines their own Exercise 1 spreadsheet  – Asked to add/ch...
Findings: Spreadsheets• Most often modified (added or changed)  fields  – Title, LCSH, tags, description  – ~60% of modifi...
Findings: Spreadsheets                               Title           Ex. 1 - View of two girls.           Ex. 2 - View of ...
Findings: SpreadsheetsLC Subject Headings:Ex. 1 Gar Wood      Orlin Johnson      BoatsEx. 2 Wood, Gar      Johnson, Orlin ...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  –   Tools  –   Resources  –   Time  –   Data  –   Loss• Inte...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  Tools - limitations of vocabularies  – Resources  – Time  –...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  – Tools - limitations of vocabularies  Resources - access a...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  – Tools - limitations of vocabularies  – Resources - access ...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  – Tools - limitations of vocabularies  – Resources - access ...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  – Tools - limitations of vocabularies  – Resources - access ...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  –   Tools - limitations of vocabularies  –   Resources - acc...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  –   Tools - limitations of vocabularies  –   Resources - acc...
Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues  –   Tools - limitations of vocabularies  –   Resources - acc...
Findings: BlogConfidence (1)• Lowest when changing existing data  “I suddenly felt very overwhelmed and under-qualified to...
Findings: BlogConfidence (2)• For some it increased across exercises  “This exercise showed me the importance of coming ba...
Findings: BlogWhat they felt they learned• “My view of descriptive cataloging has changed in the sense  that I now realize...
Conclusions• The exercises increased students’ visual  literacy  – However, increase was minimal     • Need for one-on-one...
Future Work• Continue the study with modifications:  – Provide one on one feedback about their work  – Provide students wi...
Thank you• Comments or questions?• Joan E. Beaudoin• Contact me: ee4525@wayne.edu                                 30
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VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, A Case Study of Visual Literacy

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Presented by Joan Beaudoin at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Session: Visual Literacy Case Studies


The term “visual literacy” was first coined in 1969 by Jack Debes of Kodak, co-founder of the International Visual Literacy Association. According to the Association of College and Research Libraries “Visual Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education,” visual literacy “is a set of abilities that enables an individual to effectively find, interpret, evaluate, use, and create images and visual media. Visual literacy skills equip a learner to understand and analyze the contextual, cultural, ethical, aesthetic, intellectual, and technical components involved in the production and use of visual materials. A visually literate individual is both a critical consumer of visual media and a competent contributor to a body of shared knowledge and culture.”
The three case studies in this session will explore (1) implementing visual literacy standards and guidelines at Lewis & Clark College, (2) visual literacy among library and information science students at Wayne State University, and (3) curating and building a collection of image-based art history exam questions at Michigan State University.

MODERATOR: John Taormina, Duke University

PRESENTERS:
• Joan Beaudoin, Wayne State University
“A Case Study of Visual Literacy Among Library and Information Science Students.”
• Stephanie Beene, Lewis & Clark College
“Implementing Visual Literacy Standards and Guidelines at Lewis & Clark.”
• Alex Nichols, Michigan State University
“Curating Questions: Building a Collection of Image-Based Art History Exam Questions.”

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  • Using purposeful sampling – so I am asking particular participants because I wanted to look as specific groups of people – in this case faculty who teach archaeology or art history snowball or chain method of recruitment - asked individuals known to me to contact other professionals who might be interested in participating
  • Transcript of "VRA 2012, Visual Literacy Case Studies, A Case Study of Visual Literacy "

    1. 1. A Case Study of Visual Literacyamong Library and Information Science Students Dr. Joan E. Beaudoin Assistant Professor School of Library & Information Science Wayne State University
    2. 2. Overview• Background• Questions• Methods• Findings• Conclusion 2
    3. 3. Background• Who?• What?• When?• Why? 3
    4. 4. Virtual Motor City• Detroit News’ photographic negative archive• Subset digitized and made freely available 4
    5. 5. Research Questions• RQ1: What activities increase visual literacy in the areas of image description and analysis?  What assignments, resources and lecture content increase visual literacy competencies?• RQ2: How do students’ perceive their learning process?  How can their visual literacy learning be supported? 5
    6. 6. Methods: Participants• 31 MLIS students at Wayne State University – Enrolled in Digital Libraries course• Course conducted asynchronously online – Recorded lectures of slides with audio & video• Prerequisite courses include – Intro to profession – Intro to reference – Information organization – Information technology 6
    7. 7. Methods: Data Collection• Qualitative study – Examines students’ understanding of, and affective responses to, image metadata creation• Data collection – Image records – Blog reflections• Collected at three points – At start of course – Midpoint (quality control) – At end of course 7
    8. 8. Methods: Data Collection & Analysis• Image records -> Excel Spreadsheets – Descriptive statistics • Which fields were changed most often • Which version was most often changed – Case ordered displays • Compared changes in data• Blog entries -> Word documents – Thematic analysis • Constant-comparative method 8
    9. 9. Methods: Exercise 1• Assigned week 1• Student assigned 10 to 30 images – Spreadsheet of data – Link to record• Exercise provides – Basic concepts – Reference resources – LCSH, AAT, TGN, etc. 9
    10. 10. Methods: VMC Record Example 10
    11. 11. Methods: Exercise 2• Assigned week 8• Another student reviews – Exercise 1 spreadsheet• Quality control• Course content to date – Information organization – Metadata – Usability – Evaluation in DLs – Selection – Project management 11
    12. 12. Methods: Exercise 3• Assigned week 13• Original student – Re-examines their own Exercise 1 spreadsheet – Asked to add/change anything needing additional work 12
    13. 13. Findings: Spreadsheets• Most often modified (added or changed) fields – Title, LCSH, tags, description – ~60% of modifications in Ex. 3• Majority of changes consisted of: – Capitalization, spelling, punctuation, language – More detail added 13
    14. 14. Findings: Spreadsheets Title Ex. 1 - View of two girls. Ex. 2 - View of two girls on the steamship Tashmoo. Ex. 3 - View of two girls waving to the steamship Tashmoo. 14
    15. 15. Findings: SpreadsheetsLC Subject Headings:Ex. 1 Gar Wood Orlin Johnson BoatsEx. 2 Wood, Gar Johnson, Orlin Miss America VII (Motorboats)Ex. 3 Same as 2 - should have been:Wood, Garfield Arthur, 1880-1971 15
    16. 16. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools – Resources – Time – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 16
    17. 17. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources – Time – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 17
    18. 18. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies Resources - access and availability – Time – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 18
    19. 19. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability Time - need more, better management – Data – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 19
    20. 20. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management Data - previous entries – Loss• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 20
    21. 21. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries Loss - destruction• Internal issues – Knowledge – Experience – Courage 21
    22. 22. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries – Loss - destruction• Internal issues Knowledge - own limitations – Experience – Courage 22
    23. 23. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries – Loss - destruction• Internal issues – Knowledge - own limitations Experience - cataloging and images – Courage 23
    24. 24. Findings: BlogFrustration & Dissatisfaction• External issues – Tools - limitations of vocabularies – Resources - access and availability – Time - need more, better management – Data - previous entries – Loss - destruction• Internal issues – Knowledge - own limitations – Experience - cataloging and images Courage - confidence in their own abilities 24
    25. 25. Findings: BlogConfidence (1)• Lowest when changing existing data “I suddenly felt very overwhelmed and under-qualified to work on this exercise. … I found myself faced with a dilemma ... am I fixing things or am I making them all horribly, horribly wrong?” [Student 25]• Tied to critical nature of description “Weight of knowing that your eyes might be the last ones to see an item before it goes live.” [Student 9] “[I]f the data is inaccurate, one might create user dissatisfaction and a bad reputation.” [Student 8] 25
    26. 26. Findings: BlogConfidence (2)• For some it increased across exercises “This exercise showed me the importance of coming back to materials with fresh eyes and a deeper level of experience … I didn’t find many errors, but I did feel a lot more confident in the revision process.” [Student 9]• For others it was a struggle “I am not fully satisfied with my results because I would have liked to have more time to research all of the images in order to provide more thorough annotations.” [Student 13] 26
    27. 27. Findings: BlogWhat they felt they learned• “My view of descriptive cataloging has changed in the sense that I now realize just how hard it is.” [Student 13]• “I learned from these exercises that I probably need to reign that in a bit. I was probably starting to put things into the metadata that was really just a guess, rather than accurate. Taking the time to research is great, but putting in inaccurate data is not. Take your time, be accurate, and be honest when you dont know.” [Student 25] 27
    28. 28. Conclusions• The exercises increased students’ visual literacy – However, increase was minimal • Need for one-on-one guidance – Students were more aware of the challenges involved in describing images• The students experienced a great deal of frustration during the exercises – Methods of increasing the fun factor • Enjoyed the detective work 28
    29. 29. Future Work• Continue the study with modifications: – Provide one on one feedback about their work – Provide students with framework for analyzing picture content – Find additional exercises that help with using controlled vocabularies – Interview highly effective students• Develop guidelines on how to increase visual literacy skills among individuals who describe images 29
    30. 30. Thank you• Comments or questions?• Joan E. Beaudoin• Contact me: ee4525@wayne.edu 30
    31. 31. 31
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