VRA 2012, Visual Culture, Matrices: the missing framework
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VRA 2012, Visual Culture, Matrices: the missing framework

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Presented by Brooke Scherer at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ...

Presented by Brooke Scherer at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Session: THE VISUAL CULTURE OF THE VISUALLY UNCULTURED
Marita Sturken, Associate Professor at the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Southern California and Lisa Cartwright state the following in their book Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture: “Over the course of the last two centuries, Western culture has come to be dominated by visual rather than oral or textual media. Even the bastion of the printed word, the newspaper, has turned to images— and color images by the end of the twentieth century— to draw in its readers and add to the meaning of its stories. Images have never been merely illustrations, they carry important content.”

We all seem to agree that our culture has moved from oral in tradition to a visual one. Since the digital revolution that introduced the personal computer in the 1980's our interaction with images has increased dramatically. Music videos, video games, computer graphics, computer games, and now social media contribute to increase an emphasis in the visual in our culture. Let's not forget the smart phones, the tablets and the incessant need to be connected and see something. However, it seems that our immersion in a visual culture has left us less prepared to engage in a critical visual discourse. How do we engage in critical discourse of the visual messages we receive? How do we analyze and contextualize these messages? In this session we will define context, content, methods, and examples of how a visual culture indeed shape our beliefs and ideologies.

ORGANIZER: Alma Hoffmann, Indiana Purdue Fort Wayne University

MODERATOR: Erika Church, University of Utah

PRESENTERS:
• Alma Hoffmann, Indiana Purdue Fort Wayne University
• Brooke Scherer, University of Tampa
• Renee Meyer Ernst, St. Ambrose University

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VRA 2012, Visual Culture, Matrices: the missing framework VRA 2012, Visual Culture, Matrices: the missing framework Presentation Transcript

  • MATRICES{the missing framework} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PROBLEM {thinking locally, acting globally} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PROBLEM {thinking locally, acting globally} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PROBLEM {thinking locally, acting globally} If this picture offends you, we apologize. If it doesn’t, perhaps we should explain. Because, although this picture looks innocent enough, to the Asian market, it represents death. InterTrend Communications, California BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the MATRIX {breaking down elements, forming foundations } SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} Audience: United States Client: Verizon Wireless Image Attributes: • Individualistic • Masculine • Short-Term Orientation AdAsia, New York/Los Angeles BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} Audience: China Client: Verizon Wireless Image Attributes: • Collectivistic • Masculine • Long-Term Orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X sym = symbol / clr = color / cb = consumer behavior / ic = image construction / ec = environmental context / dim = dimension / ind = individualistic / col = collectivistic / mas = masculine / fem = feminine / lpd = low power distance / hpd = high power distance / wua = weak uncertainty avoidance / sua = strong uncertainty avoidance / sto = short-term orientation / lto = long-term orientation BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PRACTICE {the matrix in use} SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X SYM CLR CB IC EC DIM SYM WUA MAS SYM FEM HPD COL SUA STO LPD LTO IND X BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • the PROJECT {opening minds, broadening horizons } • Draw for assigned country • Research: color, imagery, context, symbology, form • Break apart preexisting visual messaging • Create three posters that visually define assigned culture • Present final information and matrices to class BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepONE {research} Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Where the sun is full, colors tend to be rich, deep and vivid. Today, colors are more centered on cultural conventions. Bright Mexico Mexico’s color traditions certainly reflect its environment: the reds and yellows signal a fiesta, while red and white have more deep blue sky, the yellow sun, the warm colors of the sand and somber, religious connotations, symbolic of the passion of dirt, the greens of vegetation. Christ and purity. White alone is somewhat magical, imbued The Aztecs had very definite meanings for color: Green stood with the power to fight black magic and prevent illness. Green In China, purple is worn by for royalty, blue was for sacrifice, and yellow was for food. has come to stand for national independence. educated figures. literary and Orange represents love. Mexico’s color palette is a mix of historical associations and the en- Among the Aztecs, white meant Black was a sacred color for the Incas; Red is thought by some to have pro- In Mexico, red and death. Today, white is considered to it was the color used for sacrifices. tective capabilities. If a person white have religious vironment’s deeply toned offerings. be pure and have the ability to cure The Zapotec Indians did not differenti- passed a house where someone significance, some- sickness and fight black magic. White ate between black and purple. was very ill or had died, he or she times representing also has religious connotations. would cover his nose and mouth the Sacred Heart of with a red handkerchief. Red also the Catholic church. stands for unity. The colors of the Mexican flag are long-lived. First used in 1821, the colors are all symbolic: Green represents independence or hope; white stands for purity In some areas, yellow is the color of Dark blue is a common color for The Mayans associate green with and unity; and red stands for the mourning. Yellow marigolds are mourning clothes. For the Aztec, blue luck. The Aztecs regarded green as blood of patriots and other grown only in cemeteries. The Aztecs represented sacrifice. royal. Today, green as a national heroes. The colors also mirror used yellow to represent food. color, stands for independence. those found in different areas of the Mexican landscape. Photos courtesy of PhotoDisc, Inc. The flag’s centerpiece, the national emblem of Mexico, is drawn from the symbol of the Aztec capital, which translates to “cactus rock.” Purple is the color of death and funerals in Mexico. 25 24 6  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  7 16  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  17 Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Gonzalo García Barcka & José Luis Acosta Mexinbat Tiypo by various designers Aztlán by Gabriel Martínez Meave Lagarto by Gabriel Martínez Meave Proteo by Leonardo Vázquez Pólvora by Quique Ollervides El Chamuco by José Luiz Cóyotl Mixcóatl Lucheta Payol by Quique Ollervides Darka by Gabriel Martínez Meave Galia by Nadia Méndez Garcia Arcana by Gabriel Martínez Meave Espinosa by Cristóbal Henestrosa 4  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  5 30  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  31 BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepONE {research} Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Where the sun is full, colors tend to be rich, deep and vivid. Today, colors are more centered on cultural conventions. Bright Mexico Mexico’s color traditions certainly reflect its environment: the reds and yellows signal a fiesta, while red and white have more deep blue sky, the yellow sun, the warm colors of the sand and somber, religious connotations, symbolic of the passion of dirt, the greens of vegetation. Christ and purity. White alone is somewhat magical, imbued The Aztecs had very definite meanings for color: Green stood with the power to fight black magic and prevent illness. Green In China, purple is worn by for royalty, blue was for sacrifice, and yellow was for food. has come to stand for national independence. educated figures. literary and Orange represents love. Mexico’s color palette is a mix of historical associations and the en- Among the Aztecs, white meant Black was a sacred color for the Incas; Red is thought by some to have pro- In Mexico, red and death. Today, white is considered to it was the color used for sacrifices. tective capabilities. If a person white have religious vironment’s deeply toned offerings. be pure and have the ability to cure The Zapotec Indians did not differenti- passed a house where someone significance, some- sickness and fight black magic. White ate between black and purple. was very ill or had died, he or she times representing also has religious connotations. would cover his nose and mouth the Sacred Heart of with a red handkerchief. Red also the Catholic church. stands for unity. The colors of the Mexican flag are long-lived. First used in 1821, the colors are all symbolic: Green represents independence or hope; white stands for purity In some areas, yellow is the color of Dark blue is a common color for The Mayans associate green with and unity; and red stands for the mourning. Yellow marigolds are mourning clothes. For the Aztec, blue luck. The Aztecs regarded green as blood of patriots and other grown only in cemeteries. The Aztecs represented sacrifice. royal. Today, green as a national heroes. The colors also mirror used yellow to represent food. color, stands for independence. those found in different areas of the Mexican landscape. Photos courtesy of PhotoDisc, Inc. The flag’s centerpiece, the national emblem of Mexico, is drawn from the symbol of the Aztec capital, which translates to “cactus rock.” Purple is the color of death and funerals in Mexico. 25 24 6  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  7 16  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  17 Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Gonzalo García Barcka & José Luis Acosta Mexinbat Tiypo by various designers Aztlán by Gabriel Martínez Meave Lagarto by Gabriel Martínez Meave Proteo by Leonardo Vázquez Pólvora by Quique Ollervides El Chamuco by José Luiz Cóyotl Mixcóatl Lucheta Payol by Quique Ollervides Darka by Gabriel Martínez Meave Galia by Nadia Méndez Garcia Arcana by Gabriel Martínez Meave Espinosa by Cristóbal Henestrosa 4  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  5 30  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  31 BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepONE {research} Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Where the sun is full, colors tend to be rich, deep and vivid. Today, colors are more centered on cultural conventions. Bright Mexico Mexico’s color traditions certainly reflect its environment: the reds and yellows signal a fiesta, while red and white have more deep blue sky, the yellow sun, the warm colors of the sand and somber, religious connotations, symbolic of the passion of dirt, the greens of vegetation. Christ and purity. White alone is somewhat magical, imbued The Aztecs had very definite meanings for color: Green stood with the power to fight black magic and prevent illness. Green In China, purple is worn by for royalty, blue was for sacrifice, and yellow was for food. has come to stand for national independence. educated figures. literary and Orange represents love. Mexico’s color palette is a mix of historical associations and the en- Among the Aztecs, white meant Black was a sacred color for the Incas; Red is thought by some to have pro- In Mexico, red and death. Today, white is considered to it was the color used for sacrifices. tective capabilities. If a person white have religious vironment’s deeply toned offerings. be pure and have the ability to cure The Zapotec Indians did not differenti- passed a house where someone significance, some- sickness and fight black magic. White ate between black and purple. was very ill or had died, he or she times representing also has religious connotations. would cover his nose and mouth the Sacred Heart of with a red handkerchief. Red also the Catholic church. stands for unity. The colors of the Mexican flag are long-lived. First used in 1821, the colors are all symbolic: Green represents independence or hope; white stands for purity In some areas, yellow is the color of Dark blue is a common color for The Mayans associate green with and unity; and red stands for the mourning. Yellow marigolds are mourning clothes. For the Aztec, blue luck. The Aztecs regarded green as blood of patriots and other grown only in cemeteries. The Aztecs represented sacrifice. royal. Today, green as a national heroes. The colors also mirror used yellow to represent food. color, stands for independence. those found in different areas of the Mexican landscape. Photos courtesy of PhotoDisc, Inc. The flag’s centerpiece, the national emblem of Mexico, is drawn from the symbol of the Aztec capital, which translates to “cactus rock.” Purple is the color of death and funerals in Mexico. 25 24 6  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  7 16  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  17 Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                       INITIAL  RESEARCH                                      Cultural  Integration  |  S.  Cwalina  and  M.  Lizarraga ATypI’09 Preview | Mexico, Forging The Character | The FontFeed ATypI’09 Preview | Mexico, Forging The Character | The FontFeed 4/6/12 12:19 PM ATypI’09 Preview | Mexico, Forging The Character | The FontFeed ATypI’09 Preview | Mexico, Forging The Character | The FontFeed 4/6/12 12:19 PM 4/6/12 12:19 PM Gonzalo García Barcka & José Luis Acosta Mexinbat Tiypo by various designers Aztlán by Gabriel Martínez Meave Lagarto by Gabriel Martínez Meave Proteo by Leonardo Vázquez Pólvora by Quique Ollervides El Chamuco by José Luiz Cóyotl Mixcóatl Lucheta Payol by Quique Ollervides Darka by Gabriel Martínez Meave Galia by Nadia Méndez Garcia Arcana by Gabriel Martínez Meave Espinosa by Cristóbal Henestrosa 4  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  5 30  |   Process  Material Process  Material |  31 http://fontfeed.com/archives/atypi09-preview-mexico-forging-the-character/ http://fontfeed.com/archives/atypi09-preview-mexico-forging-the-character/ of 19 Page 4 http://fontfeed.com/archives/atypi09-preview-mexico-forging-the-character/ http://fontfeed.com/archives/atypi09-preview-mexico-forging-the-character/ of 19 Page 2 Page 3 of 19 BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTWO {break apart preexisting visual messaging} Symbolism: Skull Dimensions: • Collectivistic • Weak Uncertainty Avoidance • Long-Term Orientation Uncoded Message: • Longevity of the Product • Celebration (Day of the Dead) BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} #,,- Most feared faerie in Ireland. Only appears at night and enjoys creating havoc and mischief. A Pooka is a shape-shifter and can take any form it chooses but traditionally is seen as a dark, sleek horse with a long flowing mane and limunes- cent golden eyes. %&)*"!+)* A human that has been stolen to live in the faerie realm. You can recognize a Changeling by its appearance and manner as it will be ill-tempered and wizened and will have very dark eyes. Most at risk are midwives, mothers, babies, and young children. !"#$"%&() You may end up being the luckiest person alive if you ever manage to catch a Leprechaun. It is said that every Leprechaun has a pot of gold, hidden deep in the Irish countryside. To protect the leprechaun’s pot of gold the Irish fairies gave them magical powers to use if ever captured by a human or an animal. BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • stepTHREE {create} BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU
  • THANK YOUInformation for matrix construction developed by Dr. Geert Hofstede (Cultures and Organizations: Software of theMind), and Dr. Richard Nisbett (The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners Think Differently, and Why)BROOKE SCHERER I THE UNIVERSITY OF TAMPA I BSCHERER@UT.EDU