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Presented by Alma Hoffmann at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ...

Presented by Alma Hoffmann at the Annual Conference of the Visual Resources Association, April 18th - April 21st, 2012, in Albuquerque, New Mexico.
Session: THE VISUAL CULTURE OF THE VISUALLY UNCULTURED
Marita Sturken, Associate Professor at the Annenberg School of Communication at the University of Southern California and Lisa Cartwright state the following in their book Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture: “Over the course of the last two centuries, Western culture has come to be dominated by visual rather than oral or textual media. Even the bastion of the printed word, the newspaper, has turned to images— and color images by the end of the twentieth century— to draw in its readers and add to the meaning of its stories. Images have never been merely illustrations, they carry important content.”

We all seem to agree that our culture has moved from oral in tradition to a visual one. Since the digital revolution that introduced the personal computer in the 1980's our interaction with images has increased dramatically. Music videos, video games, computer graphics, computer games, and now social media contribute to increase an emphasis in the visual in our culture. Let's not forget the smart phones, the tablets and the incessant need to be connected and see something. However, it seems that our immersion in a visual culture has left us less prepared to engage in a critical visual discourse. How do we engage in critical discourse of the visual messages we receive? How do we analyze and contextualize these messages? In this session we will define context, content, methods, and examples of how a visual culture indeed shape our beliefs and ideologies.

ORGANIZER: Alma Hoffmann, Indiana Purdue Fort Wayne University

MODERATOR: Erika Church, University of Utah

PRESENTERS:
• Alma Hoffmann, Indiana Purdue Fort Wayne University
• Brooke Scherer, University of Tampa
• Renee Meyer Ernst, St. Ambrose University

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    VRA 2012, Visual Culture, Hoffman VRA 2012, Visual Culture, Hoffman Presentation Transcript

    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • {warning} the images in this presentation have been heavily edited and sometimes use obnoxious visual effects© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • visual culture Over the course of the last two centuries, “ Western culture has come to be dominated by the visual rather than oral or textual media. Even the bastion of the printed word, the newspaper, has turned to images…” Introduction to Visual Culture Marita Sturken & Lisa Cartwright© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • visual culture James Elkins, art critic & historian, dates the term to 1972 in this book.© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • visual culture …marked above all else by a saturation of “ social space by visual technologies, and, one must assume, a related shift in their function and significance.” The Science Journal, online encyclopedia© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • to cultivate© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • to cultivate© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • to cultivate© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • who is the visually uncultured?© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • this is what we think the visually uncultured looks like© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • this is what we think the visually uncultured looks like© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • insert daydream here this is what we think the visually uncultured looks like© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • but this is what they really look like© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • and this© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • we are technologically savvy and visually saturated online social butterflies© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • The Myth of Mulitasking Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • atis fied t, “ uns ith pa tien able w e im omfort com unc be ave ss, and oundation R epor t oh wh lowne ily F m er Fa w ith s ” 2006 Kais ilen ce. s The Myth of Mulitasking Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • atis fied t, “ uns ith pa tien able w com unc e im omfort be ave ss, and oundation R epor t oh wh lowne ily F re] w ith s 06 K a iser F a m ck b ut [a nce .” 2 0 ry “ qui sile e in kers”ve en gag thin w ho llowonal psycho logis t sha ducati very aly, e e J ane H The Myth of Mulitasking Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • the average person sees The Image Culture, Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • the average person sees 10,000 The Image Culture, Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • the average person sees 10,000 of images in the course of a day. The Image Culture, Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • & because visual culture is facilitated by social media & technology© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • “ …we’re a species of editors. We all recycle, clip and cut, remix and upload. We can make images do anything.” Manifesto for visual culture for Visual Culture published by Rencontres d’Arles in 2011© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • but the problem is that the more we see, get pic of three monkeys!© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • but the problem is that the more we see, the less we see get pic of three monkeys!© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • but the problem is that the more we see, the less we see the less we feel get pic of three monkeys!© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • but the problem is that the more we see, the less we see the less we feel the less we understand get pic of three monkeys!© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • Huffington Post collected© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • Huffington Post collected 21 tweets© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • Huffington Post collected 21 tweets of young people who didn’t know the Titanic was real. Here are some…© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • © Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • or the student who had this quote for a project “ Give a girl a good pair of shoes and she will conquer the world.” Marilyn Monroe© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • and brought images like these© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • The Myth of Mulitasking Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • we have become not only creators, editors, curators but we have also become “media multitaskers” The Myth of Mulitasking Christine Rosen© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • “Human beings have always had a capacity to attend to several things at once. But there is no doubt that the phenomenon has reached a kind of warp speed in the era of the Web— enabled computers, when it has become routine to conduct six IM conversations, watch American Idol on TV and Google the name of last season’s finalists all at once.” The Multitasking Generation, Claudia Wallis© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • “Human beings have always had a capacity to attend to several things at once. But there is no doubt that the phenomenon has reached a kind of warp speed in the era of the Web— enabled computers, when it has become routine to conduct six IM conversations, watch American Idol on TV and Google the name of last season’s finalists all at once.” The Multitasking Generation, Claudia Wallis© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • this could be our brain The mental habit of “ dividing one’s attention into many small slices…© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • this could be our brain The mental habit of “ dividing one’s attention into many small slices…© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • “…has significant implications for the way young people learn, reason, socialize, do creative work, and understand the world.” The Multitasking Generation, Claudia Wallis© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • we tax our brains… when the brain tries to divide its attention between 2 or more tasks that are equally taxing, we can’t do both. The Multitasking Generation, Claudia Wallis© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • What do we do?© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • What do we do? stop and start really looking© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • What do we do? stop and start really looking analyzing each element on a picture© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • What do we do? stop and start really looking analyzing each element on a picture don’t take anything for granted© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • What do we do? stop and start really looking analyzing each element on a picture don’t take anything for granted realize that images can be manipulated and we do form opinions however quickly© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • What do we do? stop and start really looking analyzing each element on a picture don’t take anything for granted realize that images can be manipulated and we do form opinions however quickly have conversations about the content of images we receive© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • Last thought To see someone not seeing is the best way of “ seeing intensely what he doesnt see.” Roland Barthes on Chaplin© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • Thank you!© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW
    • References 1. Rosen, Christine. "The Myth of Multitasking." The New Atlantis, Spring 2008. Web. 17 Apr. 2012. <http://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-myth-of-multitasking>. 2. Every :60 in Social Media Millions of People Connect - This Graphic Shows the Where and How." Socialjumpstart.com. 17 Feb. 2012. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. 3. "Manifesto for Visual Culture : BatesHook." BatesHook. 28 Mar. 2012. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <http://www.bateshook.com/manifesto-for-visual-culture/>. 4. Cantor, Joanne. "Conquering Cyber Overload." Don’t Speak Until You See The Whites of Their Eyes. Psychology Today, 29 Mar. 2010. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <http:// www.psychologytoday.com/blog/conquering-cyber-overload/201108/mining-your-brain-jump-start-your-creativity>. 5. Cantor, Joanne. "Conquering Cyber Overload." Flooding Your Brain’s Engine: How You Can Have Too Much of a Good Thing . Psychology Today, 29 Mar. 2010. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/conquering-cyber-overload/201108/mining-your-brain-jump-start-your-creativity>. 6. Cantor, Joanne. "Conquering Cyber Overload." Mining Your Brain to Jump-Start Your Creativity. Psychology Today, 29 Mar. 2010. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <http:// www.psychologytoday.com/blog/conquering-cyber-overload/201108/mining-your-brain-jump-start-your-creativity>. 7. "Internet 2011 in Numbers." Ramblings and Tech News from the Pingdom Team. 17 Jan. 2012. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <http://royal.pingdom.com/2012/01/17/internet-2011-in- numbers/>. 8. Malamed, Connie. "Section One: Getting Graphics." Visual Language for Designers: Principles for Creating Graphics That People Understand. Beverly, MA: Rockport, 2009. 19-44. Print. 9. Mirzoeff, Nicholas. "Introduction: Whta Is Visual Culture." Introduction. An Introduction to Visual Culture. London: Routledge, 2004. Print. 10. Rose, Gillian. "Researching Visual Materials: Towards a Critical Visual Methodology." Visual Methodologies: An Introduction to the Interpretation of Visual Materials. London: SAGE Publications, 2007. 1-27. Print. 11. Rosen, Christine. " The Image Culture." The New Atlantis, Fall 2005. Web. 17 Apr. 2012. <http://www.thenewatlantis.com/publications/the-myth-of-multitasking>. 12. "Social Media Growth Statistics." The @KISSmetrics Marketing Blog. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <http://blog.kissmetrics.com/social-media-statistics/>. 13. Sturken, Marita, and Lisa Cartwright. Introduction. Practices of Looking: An Introduction to Visual Culture. Oxford ; New York: Oxford UP, 2001. 1-13. Print. 14. Visual Culture - The Visual Turn, Visuality, Historical Emergence Of The Field Of Vision As A Site Of Power And Social Control. http://science.jrank.org/pages/8145/Visual-Culture.html 15. Wallis, Claudia. "GenM: The Multitasking Generation." Time. Time, 27 Mar. 2006. Web. 5 Apr. 2012. <http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1174696,00.html>. 16. Walter, Ekaterina. "Will The Rise of the Photo Apps Kill the Written Word?" Convince and Convert. 14 Feb. 2012. Web. 5 Apr. 2012. <http://www.convinceandconvert.com/blogging- and-content-creation/will-the-rise-of-the-photo-apps-kill-the-written-word/>. 17. Zuckerman, Marvin. "Are You a Risk Taker?" Psychology Today. Web. 10 Apr. 2012. <www.psychologytoday.com/node/22317>.© Alma Hoffmann | hoffmann@ipfw.edu | IPFW