Close Encounters of the Third Kind: Image Reference and Instruction for Film Studies
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Close Encounters of the Third Kind: Image Reference and Instruction for Film Studies

on

  • 520 views

Emilee Mathews presentation for "New Voices in the Profession" session at the VRA + ARLIS/NA 2nd Joint Conference in Minneapolis, MN.

Emilee Mathews presentation for "New Voices in the Profession" session at the VRA + ARLIS/NA 2nd Joint Conference in Minneapolis, MN.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
520
Views on SlideShare
520
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Close Encounters of the Third Kind: Image Reference and Instruction for Film Studies Close Encounters of the Third Kind: Image Reference and Instruction for Film Studies Presentation Transcript

  • Close Encounters of the Third KindImage Reference and Instruction for Film Studies
    Emilee Mathews Indiana University
  • Film Studies
    Studies the artform of film
    Related to English, theater, and communications
    Relation to art history, as a primarily visual art form
    Film stills
    Image reference
    Close Encounters of the Third Kind, publicity photo
  • Interdisciplinary survey, 2010
    Survey Question: Do you use images for teaching, presenting, or for evidence in research papers?
  • Interdisciplinary survey, 2010
    Survey Question: When you try to find images, are you looking for a specific image (such as a specific artwork) or a generalized depiction or concept?
  • Interdisciplinary survey, 2010
    Survey Question: What platforms have you used to procure images for your schoolwork? Check all that apply:
  • Interdisciplinary survey, 2010
    Survey Question:Have you had instruction from the library or from your professors in available image resources and how to use these resources?
  • Respondents’ Subdepartments of Communication and Culture (CMCL) at Indiana University
    Survey question: What is your area of study within Communication and Culture?
  • Survey question: Are you a Master’s or PhD student? Also, what year are you in your studies?
    Level of coursework
    Average: 8.4 years
  • Respondents’ Areas of Research
    “The use of moving pictures in early cinema circa 1900. Early adoption of computer technology by experimental filmmakers/video artists in the early 70s.”
    “audience reception and use of media, particularly film stars”
    “…city space, technology, and masculinity within the action film genre…Historical image archives would be extremely helpful for this...”
    “Audience and fan studies; star studies, focusing on silent-era stars; cultural memory; pop music; queer studies”
    “…media, celebrity, and the ‘obesity crisis.’”
    “Shakespeare and youth culture, particularly through film and online media”
    “experimental cinema, home movies”
  • Frequency of Image Use
    Survey question: Do you use images in your research?
  • Purpose of Images in Scholarship
    “Because it is such a visual genre…film stills… are really important.”
    “Visible evidence of filmic practices. To prove provenance of films.”
    “…I also use images to discuss "bodies" across different spectra, from gender to the abstractness of visceral action to reception and consumption of those body images.”
    “Often used to illustrate a specific point; serve as evidence of continuation of some kind of star image or persona replicating over time”
    “Close readings of images as well as context for larger arguments”
    Survey question: How do you use these images? What kinds of evidence do they provide?
  • Problems with Image Retrieval
    “Mainly, accessibility (or lack thereof) and trying not to use the same 10 or 12 images that appear everywhere online. Trying to get image captures from online video.”
    “Often the photos are removed from newspaper articles due to copyright. My areas of research are often not scanned or easily locatable online.”
    “I work with a lot of very recent media, so sometimes it's difficult to find or make stills.”
    “…images on databases tend to be pretty standard, not the fringier stuff I tend to need, in terms of pop culture and popular genres.”
    Survey question: What are some of the problems you encounter when using images for your research?
  • Problems with Image Retrieval
    “Honestly, I don't fully understand the copyright and fair use rules for image use in my writing; I'd like to incorporate more images into my writing, but I'm never entirely sure whether film stills or other images are legally fair game or not”
    “--Having to get rights to reproduce --Fees involved with this --Finding images in other places that online; finding images that haven't been reproduced hundreds of times already…”
    “copyrights”
    Survey question: What are some of the problems you encounter when using images for your research?
  • Problems with Image Retrieval
    “…low image quality from image capture of motion pictures (which I can only do as a screen shot)…”
    “Main problem is converting screen grabs to proper publishing formats (dpi, resolution, size, etc.).”
    Survey question: What are some of the problems you encounter when using images for your research?
  • “conversion of image files to standardized publish-ready images”
    “I would like information about all of these topics!”
    Survey question: Which of the following instruction topics would be most useful to you in your research?
    Most useful topics for the blog
  • Literature Review
    The User:
    Barrett, Andy. "The Information-Seeking Habits of Graduate Student Researchers in the Humanities." The Journal of Academic Librarianship 31, no. 4 (July 2005): 324-31.
    The Librarian:
    Wallach, Ruth. “The academic art library in the age of interdisciplinary discourse.” in Amanda Gluibizzi and Paul Glassman, eds. The Handbook of Art and Design Librarianship. London: Facet Publishing, 2010. 265-276.
  • Literature Review
    The resources:
    Allen, Michelle, Jessica Gardner, Helen Hanson, and Dominic Prosser. “E-learning at the University of Exeter Library.” SCONUL Focus 35 (Summer/Autumn 2005): 22-24.
    Stephen Bottomore. “Cinema museums—a worldwide list.” Film History 18 (2006): 261-273.
    ______. “A Critical View of Some Major Libraries: The Perspective of an Early Cinema Historian.” The Moving Image 4, no. 2 (Fall 2004): 86-110.
  • Literature Review
    Fair Use:
    Thompson, Kristin. “Report of the Ad Hoc Committee of the Society For Cinema Studies, ‘Fair Usage Publication of Film Stills.’” http://www.cmstudies.org/resource/resmgr/docs/fairusefilmstills.pdf (accessed March 18, 2011).
  • Relevant links
    For the blog:
    http://filmstillsresources.blog.com
    To look more closely at the survey results:
    http://emileemathews.weebly.com
    To contact me:
    Emilee Mathews
    mathewse@indiana.edu
  • Acknowledgments
    I would like to thank the following Indiana University librarians for their advice and support:
    Chanitra Bishop
    Angela Courtney
    Carrie Donovan
    Eileen Fry
    Sherri Michaels
    David Oldenkamp
    Tony White