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01 elec3114 01 elec3114 Presentation Transcript

  • 1 ELEC3114 : Control SystemsCourse convener: Dr. Branislav Hredzak, Room 204, 54895, b.hredzak@unsw.edu.auConsultations: Students are encouraged to use the openconsultation hour rather than contact by email; students may seekconsultation with the course convener at other times byappointment.Contact hours: The course consists of:• 3 hours of lectures per week,• 1 hour of tutorial every two weeks• 3 hours of laboratory every two weeks Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 2• Tutorials start in Week 4.• Laboratory starts in Week 2.• Consultation sessions start in Week 3.LecturesThe lecture times will largely be used for formal lectures andsome will be used for short quizzes. The lectures will cover thesame topics as in the text book, so lecture notes will not bedistributed. It is your responsibility to make your own notes. Youare expected to attend the lectures and prepare yourself for them. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 3TutorialsYou are expected to attend the tutorials and are expected toattempt to solve given tutorial questions before attending thetutorial.LaboratoriesThe laboratory sessions will focus on your learning about theequipment and what the control issues really are. You will beexpected to be competent in the lab by the end of the course. Mostlaboratory sessions will be flexible in that you may work ingroups or individually, helping each other and consulting thedemonstrators to the extent you need. However, you will be testedindividually on what you have learned in the laboratory sessions. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 4AssessmentThere are three components of the assessment in this course:Final examination (65%) - The final examination is a standardclosed-book three hours written examination. The examinationwill test knowledge and understanding of all major aspectscovered in the course.Laboratory test (15%) - A practical test will be run during thelaboratory time in weeks 12 and 13.Quizzes (20%) – There will be two short quizzes conductedduring the lecture times in Week 5 (10%) and Week 10(10%). You will be advised of exact timing. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 5Note:• Requests for lab exemptions must be submitted by the end of Week 2. If the lab exemption is granted, then the exam weightage will be increased by the lab test weightage (15%)• If a student has a valid reason not to attend a quiz then the exam weightage will be increased by the quiz weightage (10%).• Students who are unable to attend a lab session must arrange for a make-up lab session with the lab demonstrator. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 6Prescribed textbookThe following textbook is prescribed for the course:N. S. Nise, Control Systems Engineering, John Wiley & Sons, 4thEdition (5th Edition)Students are strongly encouraged to purchase a copy of this bookas it provides coverage of the topics in the syllabus. Lecture noteswill not be handed out. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 7Online resourcesSome additional on-line resources relevant to the course:Resource:Blackboard http://lms-blackboard.telt.unsw.edu.au/webapps/portal/frameset.jspbook website http://www.wiley.com/college/niseMATLAB http://www.mathworks.comlibrary resources http://info.library.unsw.edu.au/web/ services/teaching.html Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 8MATLABA CD containing Matlab may be borrowed overnight (against astudent card) from room EE G15A. For those students who donot have their own computers, access to these two programs isavailable in the undergraduate computer laboratory (EE G16). Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 9Course ScheduleLecturesWeek Topic(s) 1 Introduction, Modelling in the Frequency Domain 2 Modelling in the Frequency Domain 3 Modelling in the Time Domain 4 Time Response 5 Reduction of Multiple Subsystems 6 Stability 7 Steady-State Errors 8 Root Locus Techniques 9 Design via Root Locus 10 Frequency Response Techniques 11 Design via Frequency Response 12 Design via State Space Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 10Laboratory sessions- will be flexible in that you may work in groups or individually,helping each other and consulting the demonstrators to the extentyou need. However, you will be tested individually on what youhave learned in the laboratory sessions. Lab schedule: Laboratory 1 Week 2, 3 Assignments 1, 2, 3 Laboratory 2 Week 4, 5 Assignments 4, 5 Laboratory 3 Week 6, 7 Assignments 6, 7 Laboratory 4 Week 8, 9 Assignments 8, 9 Laboratory 5 Week 10, 11 Assignments 10, 11 Laboratory 6 Week 12, 13 Test Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 11 Introduction• Control system applications• How you can benefit from studying control systems The basic features and configurations of control systems• Analysis and design objectives• The design process Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 12Introduction Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 13 Introduction• a control system provides an output or response for a given input or stimulus Simplified description of a control system Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 14 IntroductionAdvantages of Control Systems1. Power amplification (a radar antenna)2. Remote control (robots)3. Convenience of input form (temperature control)4. Compensation for disturbances Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 15Response Characteristics and System Configurations Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 16Two major configurations of control systems:• open loop - does not correct for disturbances and is commanded by the input (eg toaster)• closed loop - compensates for disturbances by measuring the output response, feeding that measurement back through a feedback path, and comparing that response to the input at the summing junction. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 17 Analysis and Design Objectives • Control system responds to an input by undergoing a transient response before reaching a steady-state responseThere are several major objectives of systems analysis and design:1. producing the desired transient response2. reducing steady-state error3. achieving stability4. robust design Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 18Stability • Natural response is dependent only on the system, not the input • Forced response is dependent on the input. In a control system, the natural response must: (1) eventually approach zero, thus leaving only the forced response, or (2) oscillate. Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 19 Antenna Azimuth: An lntroduction to Position Control Systems• converts a position input command to a position output response Antenna azimuth position control system Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 20Antenna Azimuth Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 21 Antenna AzimuthResponse of a position control systemshowing effect of high and lowcontroller gain on the output response Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 22The Design Process The control system design process Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 23 The Design Process (Antenna Azimuth)Step 1: Transform Requirements into a Physical System• Requirements: desire to position the antenna from a remote location; weight, dimensions of the system• Design specifications: desired transient response, steady- state accuracy Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 24 The Design Process (Antenna Azimuth)Step 2: Draw a Functional Block Diagram Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 25 The Design Process (Antenna Azimuth)Step 3: Create a Schematic Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 26 The Design Process (Antenna Azimuth)Step 4: Develop a Mathematical Model (Block Diagram) • Use physical laws, such as Kirchhoffs laws for electrical networks and Newtons law for mechanical systems • Mathematical models can be described using 1. Differential equations 2. Laplace transform 3. State-space representation Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 27 The Design Process (Antenna Azimuth)Step 5: Reduce the Block Diagram• In order to evaluate the system response we reduce the large systems block diagram to a single block with a mathematical description that represents the system from its input to its output Equivalent block diagram for the antenna azimuth position control system Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 28 The Design Process (Antenna Azimuth)Step 6: Analyze and Design• analyze the system to see if the response specifications and performance requirements can be met by simple adjustments of system parameters• if specifications cannot be met, the designer designs additional hardware in order to achieve a desired performance Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.
  • 29Step 6: Analyze and Design Test waveforms used in control systems Dr Branislav Hredzak Control Systems Engineering, Fourth Edition by Norman S. Nise Copyright © 2004 by John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved.