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The InvestWrite Essay Competition

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InvestWrite is an effective assessment of student learning in The Stock Market Game. The InvestWrite essay competition webinar will introduce teachers to a meaningful way to practice fundamental …

InvestWrite is an effective assessment of student learning in The Stock Market Game. The InvestWrite essay competition webinar will introduce teachers to a meaningful way to practice fundamental research and writing skills, while meeting Common Core Standards and 21st Century Skills. Teachers in the InvestWrite program also give their students a chance to win exciting prizes like a trip to the floor of the New York Stock Exchange.

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  • Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchors. Generally speaking the questions students on all grades are asked to respond to fulfill these ELA Anchors on all grade levels. In the current questions, we ask students to describe their company’s plan for the future and predict where the company may be in 10 years. It requires students to have a fair amount of imagination and to infer information from what they’ve read.
  • Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchors. The correlations are in the research inherent in the questions.
  • Common Core College and Career Readiness Anchors. The assessment of proficiency will be evident on how well they use the text in support of their hypothesis/the opinion expressed in their essay.
  • Key Ideas and Details standard is the same in grades 6-12.
  • The first Craft and Structure standard is the same Grades 6-12.
  • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas standards are the same from Grades 6-10. In Grades 11-12, the first two are the same but the third is not:CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.9 Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.
  • High School: Modeling links classroom mathematics and statistics to everyday life, work, and decision-making. Modeling is the process of choosing and using appropriate mathematics and statistics to analyze empirical situations, to understand them better, and to improve decisions. Quantities and their relationships in physical, economic, public policy, social, and everyday situations can be modeled using mathematical and statistical methods. When making mathematical models, technology is valuable for varying assumptions, exploring consequences, and comparing predictions with data. Middle School:CCSS.Math.Content.7.SP.A.1 Understand that statistics can be used to gain information about a population by examining a sample of the population; generalizations about a population from a sample are valid only if the sample is representative of that population. Understand that random sampling tends to produce representative samples and support valid inferences.CCSS.Math.Content.8.SP.A.4 Understand that patterns of association can also be seen in bivariate categorical data by displaying frequencies and relative frequencies in a two-way table. Construct and interpret a two-way table summarizing data on two categorical variables collected from the same subjects. Use relative frequencies calculated for rows or columns to describe possible association between the two variables. For example, collect data from students in your class on whether or not they have a curfew on school nights and whether or not they have assigned chores at home. Is there evidence that those who have a curfew also tend to have chores?
  • The actions involved in playing the Stock Market Game engage many 21st Century Skills. Life and Career Skills: Today’s life and work environments require far more than thinking skills and content knowledge. The ability to navigate the complex life and work environments in the globally competitive information age requires students to pay rigorous attention to developing adequate life and career skills.Learning and Innovation Skills: Learning and innovation skills increasingly are being recognized as the skills that separate students who are prepared for increasingly complex life and work environments in the 21st century, and those who are not. A focus on creativity, critical thinking, communication and collaboration is essential to prepare students for the future. Information, Media and Technology Skills: People in the 21st century live in a technology and media-suffused environment, marked by various characteristics, including: 1) access to an abundance of information, 2) rapid changes in technology tools, and 3) the ability to collaborate and make individual contributions on an unprecedented scale. To be effective in the 21st century, citizens and workers must be able to exhibit a range of functional and critical thinking skills related to information, media and technology.Core Subjects: Mastery of core subjects and 21st century themes is essential for students in the 21st century. Core subjects include: ELA, Math, Economics, History, Government and Civics. In addition to these subjects, we believe schools must move beyond a focus on basic competency in core subjects to promoting understanding of academic content at much higher levels by weaving 21st century interdisciplinary themes into core subjects: Global awareness, Financial, economic, business and entrepreneurial literacy, and Civic literacy   
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  • Transcript

    • 1. “How to InvestWrite” Presented By: Vincent Young Assistant Vice President, Curriculum Initiatives Jessica Bayer InvestWrite National Program Manager Lisa A. Donnini, Ph.D. InvestWrite National Director We will answer questions via the written question option on your screen. You may enter a question at any time by opening the “Chat” box. Please type your question and we will hold an “Answer” session at the end of the presentation if time permits, or we will reply via e-mail to all attendees.
    • 2. What is ? • A national writing competition • Synthesizes and applies concepts taught in The Stock Market Game • Provides opportunities to meet writing requirements • Extends the portfolio trading experience
    • 3. • The learning doesn’t stop when the trading stops • Builds a bridge between classroom learning and the real world • Helps retain student interest
    • 4. Basics • Teachers and students must be registered in the SMG program to be eligible • Participate by writing essays in their grade division: elementary (4-5), middle (6-8), and high (9-12) • Each topic introduces or relates to investment principles linked to the SMG Program • Prizes offer excellent incentives
    • 5. Awards and Recognition Prize Patrols!!! (sshhh, it’s a secret!)
    • 6. Congratulations! Student Name Here For participating in The Stock Market Game™ National Writing Competition InvestWrite® ______________________________ ___________________________ Melanie Mortimer Bernard Beal Executive Director, SIFMA Foundation Chairman, SIFMA Foundation
    • 7. STATE WINNERS Even more opportunities for students to succeed and receive recognition! Contact your local SMG Coordinator for information regarding prizes, awards and recognition events for winning teachers and students in your local or state SMG program.
    • 8. Is Teacher and Classroom Driven • Higher Level Thinking • Collaborative Learning  Teamwork  Communication • Multi-Disciplinary • Cross Curricular • Assessment Tool • Readiness  College  Workplace  Career
    • 9. Judging Process Multiple Levels • First Step: Your Classroom • Second Step: Each essay is scored by four volunteers from the financial services industry whose scores are totaled • Third Step: Ties are broken by a panel of “Power Judges” • Final Step: Essays are ranked by second panel of “Power Judges” • COMPLETELY ANONYMOUS, ALL ON LINE
    • 10. How Essays Are Scored Same for all grade levels Equal weight Understanding of the Subject Matter • Does the student exhibit knowledge regarding the concept of researching and planning an investment strategy? The student should address the scenario using relevant terminology and display an understanding of the core concepts of the stock market in the scenario.
    • 11. How Essays are Scored Same for all grade levels Equal Weight Rationale • Is the essay thoughtful? The written argument should be presented in a manner that indicates there was a logical thinking process involved in addressing the assignment.
    • 12. How Essays Are Scored Same for all grade levels Equal Weight Writing Style • Is the student's work interesting to read? • Does the written response encourage the reader to continue reading to the conclusion of the essay? Students have an opportunity in this exercise to exhibit the ability to communicate thoughts in an engaging and inviting manner.
    • 13. Everything you need can be found at: www.investwrite.org Questions and Support Jessica Bayer InvestWrite National Program Manager help@investwrite.org
    • 14. We Promise Our InvestWrite Teachers… • Submitting your InvestWrite essays is easy • The web based program is VERY user friendly • It has functioned without being down since 2004 (not counting Super Storm Sandy) • We are here to help you • You will always receive our personal attention
    • 15. Communication is Key • Please contact your IT or system administrator and ask them to allow incoming e-mails from @investwrite.org jessica@investwrite.org lisa@investwrite.org help@investwrite.org info@investwrite.org
    • 16. 10 Essays per SMG Classroom • FOR EXAMPLE: If you are registered as a teacher with 2 SMG classrooms you may submit 20 essays. If you are registered with 3 classrooms you may submit 30 essays. – It doesn’t matter which of the classes the student whose essays you submit you are in • Selecting the Top 10 – Have another teacher or school colleague provide the first level of judging and choose the essays to submit nationally – Involve someone from a financial institution such as a banker, or financial planner, to be your classroom judge – You could even have your own students choose which essays they feel are the top ten
    • 17. Word Count Minimum 400 words 4-5 Grade maximum 700 6-8 Grade maximum 850 9-12 Grade maximum 1000 Does not include title, references, bibliography, only the actual text of the essay itself
    • 18. Submit Your Essays! It’s Easy! • Go to the website and click on “Submit InvestWrite Entries” • Teachers submit essays, not students • To submit essays you must have your SMG Advisor ID and Password with you • You will submit the essay using the student’s first name and first initial of their last name, along with their SMG team ID • Cut and paste the student essays into the system – Be sure students submit to you electronically or on a flash drive – Also not in PDF - files will not cut and paste
    • 19. Submit Your Essays! It’s Easy! • No names on the essay submission, nothing in body of essay to identify student • You will be able to go back into the system and edit essays up until the deadline • You will be asked to check a box to agree that each essay you submit is typical and representative of each student’s work • National winners will sign “Media Permission Forms”, due to privacy laws, allowing student and teacher names to be used in press and outreach regarding InvestWrite
    • 20. …and we’re available to help! We remain on line right up until the final moments up to the submission deadline to ensure there are no problems for our teachers.
    • 21. Spring 2014 Essay Submission Deadline: Wednesday, April 23 11:59 PM Eastern Time 10:59 PM Central 9:59 PM Mountain 8:59 PM Pacific
    • 22. English Language Arts and Literacy in History, Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects
    • 23. Writing, Text Types and Purposes (Standards 1-3) W.6.1. Write arguments to support claims with clear reasons and relevant evidence. W.6.2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content. W.6.3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
    • 24. Reading, Science & Technical Subjects (RST): Integration of Knowledge and Ideas (Reading, Standard 7) RST.6-8.7. Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table).
    • 25. Writing, Research to Build and Present Knowledge (Standards 7-9) W.6.7. Conduct short research projects to answer a question, drawing on several sources and refocusing the inquiry when appropriate. W.6.8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources; assess the credibility of each source; and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions of others while avoiding plagiarism and providing basic bibliographic information for sources. W.6.9. Draw evidence from ...... informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
    • 26. Teacher Support Center Filled with supporting lessons and activities
    • 27. InvestWrite “The Lesson” How to InvestWrite • All 3 grade levels • Available on the Teacher Support Center • Formatted like all other lessons • Incorporates former winning essay to help students write their own
    • 28. Common Core ELA Anchors • Key Ideas and Details – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.1 Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
    • 29. Common Core ELA Anchors • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
    • 30. Common Core ELA Anchors • Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.
    • 31. Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studied, Science, and Technical Subjects • Key Ideas and Details – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.1 Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.2 Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
    • 32. Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studied, Science, and Technical Subjects • Craft and Structure – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.4 Determine the meaning of symbols, key terms, and other domain-specific words and phrases as they are used in a specific scientific or technical context relevant to grades 6–8 texts and topics.
    • 33. Grades 6-12 Literacy in History/Social Studied, Science, and Technical Subjects • Integration of Knowledge and Ideas – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.7 Integrate quantitative or technical information expressed in words in a text with a version of that information expressed visually (e.g., in a flowchart, diagram, model, graph, or table). – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.8 Distinguish among facts, reasoned judgment based on research findings, and speculation in a text. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.6-8.9 Compare and contrast the information gained from experiments, simulations, video, or multimedia sources with that gained from reading a text on the same topic. – CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RST.11-12.9 Synthesize information from a range of sources (e.g., texts, experiments, simulations) into a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept, resolving conflicting information when possible.
    • 34. Common Core Math • Modeling (HS Domain) • Statistics and Probability (MS) – Using data samples to draw general conclusions and identifying patterns.
    • 35. 21st Century Skills Work in teams of 2 to 5 Suggest investments Evaluate portfolio performance Enter trades Look up stock quotes Take on leadership roles Read stock charts Create and Manage a $100,000 investment portfolio Read market news ELA Math Economics Financial Literacy
    • 36. • Comments • Have you used InvestWrite in your classroom? • Questions?
    • 37. Everything you need can be found at: www.investwrite.org Questions and Support Jessica Bayer InvestWrite National Program Manager help@investwrite.org