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Changes to Part L and heavyweight buildings
 

Changes to Part L and heavyweight buildings

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Tom de Saulles, building physicist, The Concrete Centre

Tom de Saulles, building physicist, The Concrete Centre

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    Changes to Part L and heavyweight buildings Changes to Part L and heavyweight buildings Presentation Transcript

    • Changes to Part L and the implications for heavyweight buildings Tom De Saulles The Concrete Centre Specifying Low Carbon Buildings Southbank Centre 7 October 2010
    • Heat loss from an average UK home 400 400 heat loss (W/K) 300 300 200 200 Base year 100 100 0 0 1970 1970 2002 2006 2002 2010 2006 2013 2010 2016 2013
    • Heat loss from an average UK home 400 +275% heat loss (W/K) 300 200 Base year 100 0 1970 2002 2006 2010 2013 2016
    • BRE Innovation Park Brookwood farm, Woking September 2010. Code level 5, ICF construction. (William Lacey Group)
    • Currently being updated for Part L 2010, 2013 & 2016.
    • Meeting 2010, 2013 targets for Part L1 1. No additional features (detached house) 2. Weather comp. 3. Weather comp. + WWHR 2010 (25%) 2013 (44%) 2016 (70%) 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR +Basic fabric spec. FGHRS + PV (1kWp) Walls: 0.25, floor: 0.18, roof: 0.13 windows: 1.5, air permeability: 5.0 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) Y-value: 0.08 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 % improvement over Part L 2006
    • Meeting 2010, 2013 targets for Part L1 (detached house) 1. No additional features 2. Weather comp. 2010 (25%) 2013 (44%) 2016 (70%) 3. Weather comp. + WWHR Basic fabric spec. Walls: 0.25, floor: 0.18, roof: 0.13 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS windows: 1.5, air permeability: 5.0 Y-value: 0.08 Enhanced fabric spec. 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) Walls reduced to 0.2 Y-value reduced to 0.05 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 % improvement over Part L 2006
    • Meeting 2010, 2013 targets for Part L1 (detached house) 2010 (25%) 2013 (44%) 2016 (70%) 1. No additional features Basic fabric spec. 2. Weather comp. Walls: 0.25, floor: 0.18, roof: 0.13 windows: 1.5, air permeability: 5.0 Y-value: 0.08 3. Weather comp. + WWHR Enhanced fabric spec. Walls reduced to 0.2 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS Y-value reduced to 0.05 Govt. fabric energy efficiency spec. 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) Walls: 0.18, windows: 1.4, floor: 0.18 roof: 0.13 air permeability: 3.0, Y-value: 0.05. 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 % improvement over Part L 2006
    • Flue gas heat recovery Waste water heat recovery (about £600 for smaller dwellings) (from about £200) • Zenex Gas Saver • Recoh-vert • Ravenheat Energy Catcher • Recoh-tray • Alpha Flowsmart • Enviroharvest • Warmit (AK Industries),
    • Meeting 2010, 2013 targets for Part L1 (detached house) + Waste water heat recovery 2010 (25%) 2013 (44%) 2016 (70%) 1. No additional features Basic fabric spec. 2. Weather comp. 3. Weather comp. + WWHR Enhanced fabric spec. 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS Govt. fabric energy efficiency spec. 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 % improvement over Part L 2006
    • Meeting 2010, 2013 & 2016 targets for Part L1 (detached house) + Waste water heat recovery 2010 (25%) 2013 (44%) 2016 (70%) + Flue gas heat recovery features 1. No additional Basic fabric spec. 2. Weather comp. 3. Weather comp. + WWHR Enhanced fabric spec. 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS Govt. fabric energy efficiency spec. 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 % improvement over Part L 2006
    • WWHR = waste water heat recovery ■ 2016 zero carbon fabric spec. ■ Enhanced 2016 zero carbon fabric spec. FGHR = Flue gas heat recovery Part L: 2010 (25%) 2013 (44%) 2016 (70%?) Flat, mid-storey 1. No additional features (50m2) 2. Weather comp. 3. Weather comp. + WWHR 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 % reduction in CO2 emission over Part L1A 2006 End terrace, 1. No additional features 2-storey (61 m2) 2. Weather comp. 3. Weather comp. + WWHR 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 % reduction in CO2 emission over Part L1A 2006 Mid terrace, 1. No additional features 2-storey (61m2) 2. Weather comp. 3. Weather comp. + WWHR 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 % reduction in CO2 emission over Part L1A 2006 End terrace, 1. No additional features 3-storey (125m2) 2. Weather comp. + 100mm cylinder insulation 3. Weather comp. + 100mm cylinder insulation + WWHR 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1 kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 % reduction in CO2 emission over Part L1A 2006 Mid terrace, 1. No additional features 3-storey (125m2) 2. weather compensator + 100mm cylinder insulation 3. Weather comp. + 100mm cylinder insulation + WWHR 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1 kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 % reduction in CO2 emission over Part L1A 2006 Detached, 1. No additional features 2-storey (127m2) 2. weather comp. + 100mm cylinder insulation 3. Weather comp. + 100mm cylinder insulation + WWHR 4. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS 5. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (1kWp) 6. Weather comp. + WWHR + FGHRS + PV (2 kWp) 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 65 70 75 80 85 90 95 100 % reduction in CO2 emission over Part L1A 2006
    • Main findings Part L1 2010 compliance: • U-value for external walls, around 0.2 – 0.25 W/m2K • Air permeability, around 5 m3/(h.m2) • Renewables are not necessary, but enhancements to services are.
    • Main findings Part L1 2010 compliance: • U-value for external walls, around 0.2 – 0.25 W/m2K • Air permeability, around 5 m3/(h.m2) • Renewables are not necessary, but enhancements to services are. Part L1 2013 compliance: • Renewables can still be avoided, but a much higher level of fabric performance is needed. • Alternatively, could use 2010 fabric performance and about 1 kW of PV.
    • Main findings Part L1 2010 compliance: • U-value for external walls, around 0.2 – 0.25 W/m2K • Air permeability, around 5 m3/(h.m2) • Renewables are not necessary, but enhancements to services are. Part L1 2013 compliance: • Renewables can still be avoided, but a much higher level of fabric performance is needed. • Alternatively, could use 2010 fabric performance and about 1 kW of PV. Part L1 2016 compliance: • Need to meet or exceed the Govt. fabric energy efficiency standard. 2 - 3 kW of PV also needed.
    • Introduction of thermal mass into Part L1 Measured by the ‘K-value’ (KJ/m2/K) This is the thermal capacity of the first 100mm, or up to the first insulating layer, if this occurs first. 100mm
    • How much thermal mass do floors and walls have? Sandwich panel, Solid masonry, Brick & block, Woodcrete block, Hemcrete block, Insulating clay block, Up to 230 kJ/m2K Up to 190 kJ/m2K Up to 190 kJ/m2K Up to 145 kJ/m2K Up to 135 kJ/m2K Up to 65 kJ/m2K Frame construction Frame construction Block partition, Stud partition, Hollow core Beam & block 2 x plasterboard, 1 x plasterboard, Up to 100 kJ/m2K Up to 9 kJ/m2K upper floor, up to upper floor, up to Up to 18 kJ/m2K Up to 9 kJ/m2K 120/160 kJ/m2K 120/40 kJ/m2K Timber upper floor, Insitu-concrete Beam & block Timber ground floor, up to 9/18 kJ/m2K ground floor, ground floor, up to 20 kJ/m2K up to 140 kJ/m2K up to 110 kJ/m2K
    • Arup/Concrete Centre thermal properties tool
    • Heating season: daytime Sun at midday 17º - 40º South Heating season: night-time
    • What difference can thermal mass make in SAP 2009? EXAMPLE: Highly insulated, airtight semi-detached house with efficient heating and controls. RESULT: • Moving from low to high thermal mass reduces emissions by about 3-4% • This is roughly the same as changing the external wall U-value from 0.2 to 0.15
    • New full fill insulation system Achieves a U-value of 0.17 - 0.18 with a 100mm cavity
    • Summertime performance / overheating • The Zero Carbon Hub is calling for an improved overheating check that must be passed by all new homes.
    • Summertime performance / overheating • The Zero Carbon Hub is calling for an improved overheating check that must be passed by all new homes. • The check should take account of future climate change. • It should also take proper account of night cooling and thermal mass.
    • Free passive design tool (currently under development)
    • Part L2 (2010) New drivers for passive cooling • 25% reduction in emissions required by Part L2
    • Part L2 (2010) New drivers for passive cooling • 25% reduction in emissions required by Part L2 • 23% increase in the assumed CO2 emissions from electricity (Part L1 and L2)
    • Part L2 (2010) New drivers for passive cooling • 25% reduction in emissions required by Part L2 • 23% increase in the assumed CO2 emissions from electricity (Part L1 and L2) • New limits for solar gain in Part L2
    • Part L2 (2010) New drivers for passive cooling • 25% reduction in emissions required by Part L2 • 23% increase in the assumed CO2 emissions from electricity (Part L1 and L2) • New limits for solar gain in Part L2 • 25 - 60% increase in the cost of electricity expected by 2016 (Ofgem)
    • Part L2 (2010) New drivers for passive cooling • 25% reduction in emissions required by Part L2 • 23% increase in the assumed CO2 emissions from electricity (Part L1 and L2) • New limits for solar gain in Part L2 • 25 - 60% increase in the cost of electricity expected by 2016 (Ofgem) • Possible relaxation of peak internal temperature in BCO specification (from 22°C to 25°C)
    • Flat slab with natural ventilation Coffered slab & underfloor ventilation Hollowcore slab (Termodeck®) Water-cooled slab
    • Manchester University Business School Completion: 2011 Architect: Feilden Clegg Bradley Precast, lattice girder floors with integral water cooling pipes.
    • Woodland Trust HQ, Lincolnshire Completion: Autumn 2010 Architect: Feilden Clegg Bradley
    • Key messages: • Compliance with Part L1 in 2010, 2013 & 2016 does not present any particular issues for masonry/concrete housing.
    • Key messages: • Compliance with Part L1 in 2010, 2013 & 2016 does not present any particular issues for masonry/concrete housing. • Heat recovery systems can help with 2010 and 2013 compliance and avoid the need for costly renewables.
    • Key messages: • Compliance with Part L1 in 2010, 2013 & 2016 does not present any particular issues for masonry/concrete housing. • Heat recovery systems can help with 2010 and 2013 compliance and avoid the need for costly renewables. • SAP now includes thermal mass, and shows a year-round round benefit in highly insulated and airtight heavyweight dwellings.
    • Key messages: • Compliance with Part L1 in 2010, 2013 & 2016 does not present any particular issues for masonry/concrete housing. • Heat recovery systems can help with 2010 and 2013 compliance and avoid the need for costly renewables. • SAP now includes thermal mass, and shows a year-round round benefit in highly insulated and airtight heavyweight dwellings. • The dwelling overheating check in SAP is likely to be revisited.
    • Key messages: • Compliance with Part L1 in 2010, 2013 & 2016 does not present any particular issues for masonry/concrete housing. • Heat recovery systems can help with 2010 and 2013 compliance and avoid the need for costly renewables. • SAP now includes thermal mass, and shows a year-round round benefit in highly insulated and airtight heavyweight dwellings. • The dwelling overheating check in SAP is likely to be revisited. • There is likely to be a move from air-conditioning to passive cooling solutions in many new, non-domestic buildings.
    • Thank you tdesaulles@concretecentre.com