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Live Healthy

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Obesity is a huge issue, no pun intended. With everything going on today, how can anyone expect to get in shape or to live healthy?

Obesity is a huge issue, no pun intended. With everything going on today, how can anyone expect to get in shape or to live healthy?


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  • We have never had an epidemic like this that we have been able to track so thoroughly and see. As I told you, this is conservative.About 60 million adults, or 30 percent of the adult population, are now obese, which represents a doubling of the rate since 1980.<number>
  • We have never had an epidemic like this that we have been able to track so thoroughly and see. As I told you, this is conservative.About 60 million adults, or 30 percent of the adult population, are now obese, which represents a doubling of the rate since 1980.<number>
  • We have never had an epidemic like this that we have been able to track so thoroughly and see. As I told you, this is conservative.About 60 million adults, or 30 percent of the adult population, are now obese, which represents a doubling of the rate since 1980.<number>
  • We have never had an epidemic like this that we have been able to track so thoroughly and see. As I told you, this is conservative.About 60 million adults, or 30 percent of the adult population, are now obese, which represents a doubling of the rate since 1980.<number>
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  • Transcript

    • 1. How to Live A Healthy Lifestyle Or: Get Off the Couch, and Go!
    • 2. Health Issues Today Obesity Cancers REAL health issues that seem to be defined… Cardiovascular but different experts Aging claim different solutions Lets take a look at some of the facts... 2 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 3. America is under attack! America is under attack from obesity. While it is easy to blame the issue purely on gluttony, sloth, and Guitar Hero, there are several social influencing factors: Family history/genetics. If one of your parents is obese, you are 3 times as likely to be obese as someone with parents of healthy weight. Family’s/friends’ lifestyles. If your family or friends eat a lot of high-fat or snack foods, eat at irregular times, and skip meals, you probably will too. And if they are not physically active, you may not be either. If your friends are sitting on the couch drinking beers, eating wings, and watching football, what are the odds you’ll have celery sticks and do jumping jacks next to the couch? Not too high. Y o u Source: http://www.webmd.com/diet/tc/obesity-cause Source: American Gastroenterological Association (2002). AGA technical review on obesity. Gastroenterology, 123(3): 882–932. 3 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 4. Break the cycle Some factors for obesity are internal - you can do something about them! Low self-esteem. Being overweight or obese may lower your self-esteem and lead to even more eating as a way to comfort yourself. Repeated failure at dieting also can affect your self-esteem and make it even more difficult to lose weight. Emotional concerns. Emotional stress, anxiety, or illnesses such as depression or chronic pain can lead to overeating. Some people eat to calm themselves, to avoid dealing with unpleasant tasks or situations, or to dampen negative emotions. I eat because I am sad I am sad because I eat Source: http://www.webmd.com/diet/tc/obesity-cause 4 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 5. It’s not your fault…is it? Some factors for obesity are caused by external events and substances around us Trauma. Distressing events, marital or family problems, can contribute to overeating. Alcohol is very high in calories, and may cause weight gain around your stomach. Medicines or medical conditions. Some medical conditions and medications may also cause weight gain. Examples include Cushing's syndrome, hypothyroidism, taking antidepressants, or taking corticosteroids. + + = You. Source: http://www.webmd.com/diet/tc/obesity-cause 5 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 6. Did we grow up this way? Maybe… 32 33 19 17 19% of children ages 6- 17% of children ages 12- 33% of adults are overweight 11 years are overweight 19 years are overweight 32% of adults are obese By taking control early, we can stem a much larger issue. Note: Adults over 19 and not institutionalized Source: Prevalence of Overweight Among Children and Adolescents: United States, 2003-2004 Source: NHANES data on the Prevalence of Overweight and Obesity Among Adults-United States, 2003-2004 Source: http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/overwt.htm 6 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 7. Starting young and getting worse The Journal of the American Medical Association studied the United States population over two time periods: Overall, in 2003-2006, for children 2-19: 11.3% were at or above the 97th percentile of the numbers reported in the 2000 BMI-for- age growth charts 16.3% were at or above the 95th percentile 31.9% were at or above the 85th percentile This is troubling, as it shows an accelerating distribution through society 32% of kids in 2003-2006 are in the top 15% overweight from 2000 (~2x) 16% of kids in 2003-2006 are in the top 5% overweight from 2000 (~3x) 11% of kids in 2003-2006 are in the top 3% overweight from 2000 (~4x) Our kids are growing out instead of up! Source: http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/299/20/2401 7 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 8. What does this mean for the country? This rate of obesity raises concern because of its implications for the health of Americans; obesity increases the risk of many diseases and health conditions. These include: Coronary heart disease Type 2 diabetes Cancers (endometrial, breast, and colon) Hypertension (high blood pressure) Dyslipidemia (for example, high total cholesterol or high levels of triglycerides) Stroke Liver and Gallbladder disease Sleep apnea and respiratory problems Osteoarthritis (a degeneration of cartilage and its underlying bone within a joint) Gynecological problems (abnormal menses, infertility) Source: http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/obesity/index.htm 8 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 9. So what has happened to us over the past 24 yrs? (move quickly through the slides for ‘animation’) 9 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 10. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1985 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 10 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 11. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1986 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 11 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 12. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1987 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 12 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 13. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1988 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 13 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 14. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1989 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 14 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 15. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1990 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 16. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1991 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 16 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 17. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1992 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 17 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 18. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1993 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 18 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 19. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1994 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 19 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 20. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1995 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 21. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1996 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 21 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 22. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1997 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% 22 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 23. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1998 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% 23 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 24. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 1999 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% 24 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 25. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2000 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% ≥20% 25 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 26. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2001 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% 26 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 27. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2002 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% 27 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 28. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2003 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% 28 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 29. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2004 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% ≥25% 29 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 30. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2005 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% 30 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 31. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2006 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% 31 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 32. Obesity Trends* Among U.S. Adults BRFSS, 2007 (*BMI ≥30, or ~ 30 lbs. overweight for 5’ 4” person) Source: CDC Behavioral risk Factor Surveillance System Interviews No Data <10% 10%–14% 15%–19% 20%–24% 25%–29% ≥30% 32 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 33. Pretty Scary, isn’t it? (Red was bad!) 33 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 34. So what can we do about this issue? Healthy, sustainable lifestyle modification through the right nutrition and exercise program can get us back on track. The following exercise plans are evaluated using available resources as well as my own personal experience with each of them. Ranking is based on long-term effectiveness towards real fitness. I’ve also included some reviews of various diet plans out there – Remember though: eating is about nutrition. Don’t use ‘fad diets.’ They may work short term, but once you “go off” that diet, you’ll regain all the weight you lost. It’s about adopting a life-long diet you can enjoy, not going from fad diet to fad diet which you most certainly won’t. 34 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 35. Popular Exercise Programs – Jogging How it works: Wake up early, jog at a leisurely pace, have a nice stretch. Tell everyone about your jogging lifestyle. Other light aerobic activity is included here as well – treadmill, bicycle, walking, power walking, etc. Equipment needed: Anyone can jog - you don’t even need a gym. If you do have a gym, you don’t need to go outside, but you might want to spring for a towel to throw over the display and avoid embarrassment when the hot girl next to you sees you jumping off all sweaty and out of breath after only a half mile. Pros – Easy. Pace and timing can fit your availability. Cons – No intensity (don’t be offended, this is about muscular intensity), no mandated structure. – High impact, can cause knee injuries Overall – Better than sitting around and watching TV…. Rating: Source: p90x Website 35 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 36. Popular Exercise Programs – “Working Out” How it works: Gyms have weight machines and free weights. You go in, you work on groups of muscles every other day. Weight training allows you to target specific muscle groups – from arms, chest, stomach, legs and calves. But without a proper diet, your newfound muscles can still be hidden under flab. Equipment needed: Anyone can go to a gym, provided you can pay for membership. Pros – Easy. There are no specific demands placed on you except those levered by your own discipline. Cons – You must work out three times a week to see benefit. Motivating yourself to go to the gym more than once a week can be hard! Overall – Better than sitting around watching TV. Rating: 36 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 37. Popular Exercise Programs – DVDs How it works: A slew of video workouts allow anyone with a TV and some simple equipment to get a workout. For the purposes of this review, we will take P90x as the example, as it is one of the most popular and intense. Equipment needed: A TV and DVD player, some space, and a pull-up bar. The 12 routines are typically fast- paced and intense, and can take over an hour each. P90X uses an advanced training technique called quot;Muscle Confusion,quot; which accelerates the results process by constantly introducing new moves and routines so your body never plateaus. This is a revolutionary system designed to transform your body from “regular to ripped” in just 90 days. Most people will be able to do all the movements, though there is a bit of a learning curve to do them well. Pros – Intense workouts that do not require a gym. Structured and time-bound – has every workout for 90 days. Cons – You have to buy the package, which can be pricey. Overall – A decent program if you can’t get to a gym. Rating: Source: p90x Website 37 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 38. Popular Exercise Programs – Negatives How it works: This theory of exercise, also called 'eccentric training' allows you to lift 30-50% more weight than the traditional method. How? When picking up a weight, the strength of your muscle is required to exert more force than the weight itself. When putting a weight down, your muscles only need to slow it down – allowing you to get in those last few reps that you might have missed, or to work on a greater weight than initially possible. Equipment needed: Following the program takes some learning. Free weight usage requires a partner. Machine negatives are also possible, and do not require a partner. Also works for leg press, chest press, and any machine where both arms or legs do not move independently. Pros – Intensity and scalability are possible but not mandated. Quick workouts possible. Excellent documented results. Cons –Requires access to a proper gym and a partner, and should be attempted only after being properly acquainted with the right form and movement. Overall – A good program as an upgrade from normal weightlifting. Rating: Source: Go Negative on bNet – This article has lots of good citations too Source: The Colorado Experiment Source: The 4 Hour Workweek 38 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 39. Popular Exercise Programs – Cross Functional How it works: There are a few workouts that eschew the routine and rigidity of the traditional ‘iron pumping’ in favor of more varied, cross muscular, natural movements. Take the CrossFit program, for example. CrossFit bills itself as the principal strength and conditioning program for many police academies and tactical operations teams, military special operations units, champion martial artists, and hundreds of other elite and professional athletes worldwide. Equipment needed: Following the program is simple – a new workout is posted on the website each morning. Anyone can view them, and try to do them to the best of their ability. Actual equipment varies daily, and with some workouts you may be able to get by, but to get the full benefits you’ll need gym access. Pros – Intensity and scalability are valued over routine, and there is a lot of explanation behind the system and the excursuses for those who wish to read it. There is also a great community around the nation to discuss and share best practices. Cons – A focus on Olympic style weightlifting requires access to a proper gym. This workout is not for newbies. Overall – A terrific program for those already in good enough shape to do the workouts at all. Rating: Source: www.crossfit.com 39 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 40. Popular Eating Programs – Caloric Restriction Can a technique that makes mice live twice as long do the same for people? As long as we get the nutrients we need, do we truly need much more food? How it works: Calorie restriction involves simply eating much less than normal <1200 calories per day. You must take supplements to make sure you get essential nutrients. CR has been shown to lower cholesterol, fasting glucose, and blood pressure. Get good supplements for vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and any other nutrient that is important to your personal development plan. Eat very little else. Pros – Simple. Supplement and eat less. No complicated eating rules to remember. Less spending on food saves money. Cons – Eating less can lead to starvation and a host of other real life long term issues (catabolic damage, where the body eats itself to survive) Overall – If you need to lose weight, there are healthier ways to do it. Rating: Source: Qin W Calorie restriction attenuates Alzheimer's disease type brain amyloidosis in Squirrel monkeys Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calorie_restriction Source: The Retardation of Aging and Disease by Dietary Restriction 40 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 41. Popular Eating Programs – Very Low Carb When the high-protein, low carbohydrate craze came to town, it was initially hailed as the solution to America's national eating disorder. While there are several low-carb or zero carb programs out there, we will look at Atkins as it was one of the first and biggest. How it works: Atkins has changed recently to be more accommodating. It now has its own food pyramid, and dieters are encouraged to maximize the proteins they eat, and then eat fruits and vegetables. You should count the Net Carbs in your food, and keep it under 30g per day for the first few weeks, and then can start earning more. Support tools: One can follow the Atkins diet by joining the discussion community on the website, and then monitoring their own food intake. Pros – While controversial, it has been shown to be effective for some. Cons – Eating very low carbs leads to fatigue, especially when combined with an intense workout. The surgeon general recommended against this plan when introduced. Overall – If you don’t mind giving up all your bread, low-carb may work for you. Rating: Source: Atkins Diet Website Source: http://diets.ultimatefatburner.com/review-dr-atkins-diet/ Source: Shape Up America! news release 29 December 2003. 41 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 42. Popular Eating Programs – “Lifestyle” After the backlash that initial low-carb diets incurred from the media, a slew of softer, “lifestyle” themed diets popped up to compete for consumer attention. The South Beach diet continues to be, one of the most popular. How it works: The South Beach diet bills itself as a food lover's diet. It's about living well and loving what you eat. But it's also practical, flexible, easy, and effective. After an initial phase to stop the cravings, the bulk of the dieting on SB involves eating “good carbs” like whole wheat, brown rice, and certain starchy vegetables (eg. Sweet potato). You are also encouraged to eat as much lean protein as you need. Support tools: One can join the South Beach diet by signing up on the website. Pros – A bit more accommodating than extreme low-carb high protein diets, with the veneer of lifestyle and fun. Emphasis on tasty food, and comes with a wealth of interesting recipes that are on the plan. Cons – Still a high protein low-carb diet. Overall – Users have termed it “a glossed-up Atkins diet that hat been watered down for beach-going soccer moms.” Not that there is anything wrong with being a beach-going soccer mom… Rating: Source: South Beach Diet Website 42 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 43. Popular Eating Programs – Meal Systems A few programs in the market claim to bring nutrition and simplicity to your life by providing you with all the meals you need to eat, pre-made, delivered to you. We will look at Nutrisystem as an example/ . How it works: Nutrisystem has a plan and a program for everyone: men, women, diabetics and vegetarians each get tailored programs. They also have a program for every price point: flex programs at a low price point, select premium programs that include gourmet food, etc. They bill themselves as a program that balances lifestyle and know-how, and use trademarked terms like Glycemic Advantage and OmegaSol to discuss good carbohydrates, and fish oil fatty acids. Support tools: With the Auto delivery subscription option, this plan is very easy to follow. Food gets to your door, and all you have to do is eat it. They also recommend groceries to supplement the premade meals. Pros – Easy to follow. Subscription fees are also much of your food expense. Tailored plans make you feel special. Stresses portion control. Cons –Low flexibility – once the food is mailed to you, you must eat it. Overall – Not a terrible program if you don’t want to think about what to eat. Expensive. Rating: Source: Nutrisystem Website 43 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 44. Popular Eating Programs – Metabolism Most recently, fad diets have begun to rebrand themselves as lifestyles, and focus more on metabolism and ongoing action, along with key elements of earlier programs. My favorite of these is the Zone Diet. How it works: The Zone Diet bills is designed to help your body achieve the hormonal and genetic balance you need for long-term weight control, as well as optimal heart, brain and immune function, through optimal proportioning of lean proteins, vegetables and essential monounsaturated fats. Support tools: Make sure that each meal or snack follows the simple proportion of 1/3 lean protein, and 2/3 low-glycemic vegetables. Advanced Zone dieting involves counting blocks in a detailed point system for food. Pros: Easy to transition to – keep your eating schedule and content, but fit the proportions. Borrows some of the good from various diets – low in processed carbs, low in caloric intake, focus on proteins, emotional state and balance in all things. Cons: Lengthy block system is more than I am interested in devoting time to. I need my eating plan to be simple. Overall : The system is simple, the messaging is positive, and the focus on overall health is evident. Rating: Source: Zone Diet Website 44 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 45. Summary − Food and Exercise: Obesity Cure If you believe what I have told you so far – that being overweight is a problem, but that there are a variety of tools and practices that can get you into shape, and if not overweight, can get you into elite shape, what can you do? Exercise on a schedule you can stick to, with a plan that requires equipment you have access to. Work out with INTENSITY. Eat a full vitamin, nutrition, amino acid profile. Make sure you don’t overeat calories, while ensuring that your plan is sustainable and fulfilling. Conclusion: Wanting to get into peak physical shape is a feasible goal. You can do it. Star Power can help! Personal Note: In my experience, I have had the best results with the Zone Diet, and with CrossFit or Negative Lifts. When I started my program, I lost 15 pounds my first month, and 1-2 pounds per week thereafter. 45 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 46. Brought to you by Star Power! Want to get your life on the right track? Why not start by supplementing your nutritional plan with the heart-healthy antioxidants found in Star Power’s 100% starfruit juice? Rich in antioxidants and Vitamin C, its unlike anything else. Live Healthy with Star Power – it’s the better breakfast beverage. Website: www.drinkstarpower.com Company Blog: journal.drinkstarpower.com Author Information: Vik Venkatraman is an expert in health, nutrition and consumer products. He has been advising businesses and individuals on branding, strategy and marketing for 5 years. Email: vik.venkat@drinkstarpower.com Twitter: www.twitter.com/vikvenkat 46 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 47. Appendix: Tools How healthy are you? Check out this Calorie Calculator http://www.webmd.com/hw-popup/calories-burned 47 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.
    • 48. Appendix Definitions: Obesity: Having a very high amount of body fat in relation to lean body mass, or Body Mass Index (BMI) of 30 or higher. Body Mass Index (BMI): A measure of an adult’s weight in relation to his or her height, specifically the adult’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of his or her height in meters. In 1990, among states participating in the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System, 10 states had a prevalence of obesity less than 10% and no states had prevalence equal to or greater than 15%. By 1998, no state had prevalence less than 10%, seven states had a prevalence of obesity between 20-24%, and no state had prevalence equal to or greater than 25%. In 2007, only one state (Colorado) had a prevalence of obesity less than 20%. Thirty states had a prevalence equal to or greater than 25%; three of these states (Alabama, Mississippi and Tennessee) had a prevalence of obesity equal to or greater than 30%. The data shown in these maps were collected through CDC’s Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). Each year, state health departments use standard procedures to collect data through a series of monthly telephone interviews with U.S. adults. Prevalence estimates generated for the maps may vary slightly from those generated for the states by BRFSS (http://aps.nccd.cdc.gov/brfss) as slightly different analytic methods are used. BRFSS, Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System http: //www.cdc.gov/brfss/ Mokdad AH, et al. The spread of the obesity epidemic in the United States, 1991—1998 JAMA 1999; 282:16:1519–1522. Mokdad AH, et al. The continuing epidemics of obesity and diabetes in the United States. JAMA. 2001; 286:10:1519–22. Mokdad AH, et al. Prevalence of obesity, diabetes, and obesity-related health risk factors, 2001. JAMA 2003: 289:1: 76–79 CDC. State-Specific Prevalence of Obesity Among Adults — United States, 2005; MMWR 2006; 55(36);985–988 48 © 2009 Star Power LLC, Please reference if distributed.