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    12 Pragmatic Actions for Extraordinary Change Leadership 12 Pragmatic Actions for Extraordinary Change Leadership Presentation Transcript

    • 12 Pragmatic Actions for Extraordinary Change Leadership Tom Devane May 12, 2011
    • Objectives
      • By the end of this session you will be able to …
      • Ensure your Black Belts and change agents develop tangible change plans that tie to business results and foster accountability
      • Apply appropriate levers for “Big C” organization-wide changes and “little c” local improvement projects
      • Engage employees the “right amount” so you get enthusiastic employee commitment without taking forever to do it
      • Incorporate the critical elements required to make a change sustainable, and eliminate backsliding.
    • Agenda
      • Introduction
      • Analytical framework for change triage
      • Mini-case #1 – Accelerating change to warp speed
      • High-leverage distinctions for Big C vs little c change
      • Mini-case #2 – Excellent executive recovery
      • Innovative delivery mechanisms for rapid, sustainable change
      • Mini-case #3 – Infection reductions of 38% to 88% in 24 months
      • Wrap-up and questions
      • Introduction
    • What kept Linda the CEO awake…
      • From 11pm to 2am
        • Knowing they needed LSS, but the organization was already stretched on resources
        • Making it a priority – with EVERYONE
        • “ Just another initiative” mentality
      • From 2am to 4am
        • Instilling a culture of accountability & ownership
        • Methodology to use, tool de-emphasis, & where to start
        • Short-term results, long-term sustainability & honest measurement & reporting.
      • Analytical framework for change triage
    • Initial approach screen Nature of problem Nature of implementation Technical Adaptive Adaptive Technical
    • Initial approach screen
      • Determines who needs to be involved
      • Determines scope, and extent of engagement
      • Determine the scope of, and timing of the involvement of the local Black Belt.
      Addresses the all-important concerns about resources, expectation setting, prioritization, and ownership/accountability
      • Mini-case #1 – Accelerating change to warp speed
    • Situation
      • Patient check-in process was broken
      • Involved multiple groups
      • Quality of care was high, quality of service and cost management were poor
      • Process workers felt the process was under-staffed
      • “ Certified” BBs missed important metrics, such as first pass yield
      • Six Sigma tools tried on 2 previous occasions; met with resistance and failed.
    • Solution screen & pragmatic tips
      • Forces to channel
      • Conditions to create
    • Pragmatic tips illustrated
      • Forces to channel
      • Tradition
      • Ownership
      • Conditions to create
      • Match
      • Communicate
      Change agents encouraged to develop innovative delivery systems
      • 4. High-leverage distinctions for Big C vs little c change
    • Distinctions
      • Big C – organization-wide, or large segment of an organization, such as GE’s deployment of Six Sigma or a company’s implementation of an ERP system
      • Little c – local, such as a single BB project
      • Different levers available for each.
      • 5. Mini-case #2 – Excellent executive recovery
    • CA-based HMO & insurance provider
      • Interest in Lean Six Sigma outpaced demand of internal resources to deliver
      • Problems erupted as local groups hired external resources, all with various approach
      • Internal group exhorted standardization, local business units didn’t want to (and in many cases didn’t) wait
    • Pragmatic tips illustrated
      • Forces to channel
      • Tradition
      • Ownership
      • Connection
      • Choice
      • Conditions to create
      • Match
      • Communicate
      • Path with energy
      • Top mgt active visibility
      Change agents encouraged to develop innovative delivery systems
      • 6. Innovative delivery mechanisms for rapid, sustainable change
    • Innovation examples & war stories
      • Business card-sized executive behavior reminders
      • Group methods for quick productivity. Some examples:
        • Search conference
        • Appreciative inquiry
        • World Café
        • Visual Explorer
      • Chocolate pudding
      • 7. Mini-case #3 – Infection reductions of 38% to 88% in 24 months
    • Pragmatic tips illustrated
      • Forces to channel
      • Tradition
      • Ownership
      • Connection
      • Choice
      • Peer-to-peer
      • Feel good
      • Conditions to create
      • Match
      • Communicate
      • Path with energy
      • Top mgt active visibility
      • Positivity
      • Safety & accountability
      Change agents encouraged to develop innovative delivery systems
      • The high-powered contribution to change management from an associate professor from the University of Virginia…
    • The 12 pragmatic actions for extraordinary change leadership
      • Forces to channel
      • Tradition
      • Ownership
      • Connection
      • Choice
      • Peer-to-peer
      • Feel good
      • Conditions to create
      • Match
      • Communicate
      • Path with energy
      • Top mgt active visibility
      • Positivity
      • Safety & accountability
      Change agents encouraged to develop innovative delivery systems
      • 8. Wrap-up and questions
    • References
      • Devane, T. Integrating Lean Six Sigma and High-Performance Organizations. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2005.
      • Heifitz, R. and Linsky, M. Leadership on the Line. Boston: Harvard Business School Publishing, 2002.
      • Haidt, Jonathan. The Happiness Hypothesis. New York: Basic Books, 2006.
      • Holman, P., Devane, T., and Cady, S. The Change Handbook. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler, 2007.
      • Jackson, Phil. Sacred Hoops: Spiritual Lessons of a Hardwood Warrior. New York: Hyperion, 1995.
      • Rogers, Everett M. Diffusion of Innovations. New York: The Free Press, 1995.
    • About the Presenter
      • Tom Devane is a workshop leader, author, coach, and consultant who helps organizations achieve dramatically higher levels of performance by combining “hard” and “soft” aspects of performance improvement. With 32 years of global experience in Big Six consulting, industry, and private consulting practice he has helped organizations achieve performance improvements ranging from 35% to 1,285%. Representative clients include Microsoft, Porter Memorial Hospital, Johnson & Johnson, General Electric, Rose Medical Center, AT&T, and the government of South Africa.
      • Practical leadership tips and tools for senior managers, middle managers, and change agents appear in his books The Change Handbook (Berrett-Koehler, 1999, 2007), Integrating Lean Six Sigma and High-Performance Organizations (John Wiley & Sons, 2003). His articles in www.isixsigma.com , The OD Practitioners Journal , and Executive Excellence Magazine provide additional pragmatic implementation advice.
      • Prior to starting his own firm 23 years ago, Tom held leadership positions at two Big Six consulting firms and an alternative energy fuels firm. He holds BS and MS degrees in Finance from the University of Illinois.
      • For questions after the conference:
      • [email_address]
      • www.tomdevane.com
      • 610.873.6030 (v)