Viewpoints workshop handbook_final
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Viewpoints workshop handbook_final

on

  • 942 views

This Viewpoints Handbook is designed to help you with curriculum design, at module or whole-course level....

This Viewpoints Handbook is designed to help you with curriculum design, at module or whole-course level.

The Handbook will give you all the information you need to run a curriculum design workshop with your course team, using our reflective resources - a learner timeline worksheet and best-practice pedagogical principles based around four themes - Assessment and Feedback, Information Skills, Learner Engagement and Creativity in the Curriculum.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
942
Views on SlideShare
942
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Viewpoints workshop handbook_final Viewpoints workshop handbook_final Document Transcript

  • VIEWPOINTS HANDBOOK A PRACTICAL GUIDETO CURRICULUM DESIGN (WORKSHOP FORMAT)
  • HANDBOOK – TABLE OF CONTENTSEXECUTIVE SUMMARY Page 2CHAPTER ONE. VIEWPOINTS INTRODUCTION – WHAT WE DO 1.1 Viewpoints and curriculum design Page 3 1.2 The Viewpoints process Page 3 1.3 Workshop purpose Page 5 1.4 Benefits of having a Viewpoints workshop Page 5 1.5 Four themes, two views Page 6CHAPTER TWO. USING THE VIEWPOINTS HANDBOOK 2.1 Who can use this Handbook? Page 8 2.2 What resources are included? (Download Pack) Page 8 2.3 Contents of Download Pack Page 8 2.4 What do you want to do? (Flow diagram) Page 10CHAPTER THREE. HOLDING A WORKSHOP 3.1 Typical workshop format (Module-level) Page 11 3.2 Typical workshop format (Course-level) Page 12 3.3 Essential workshop preparation Page 13 3.4 Essential workshop resources Page 15 3.5 Roles in a workshop – who does what? Page 17 3.6 Recording workshop outputs Page 19 3.7 Hints and tips Page 21CHAPTER FOUR. THEMES FOR YOUR WORKSHOP 4.1 Assessment and Feedback Page 23 4.2 Information Skills Page 26 4.3 Learner Engagement Page 29 4.4 Creativity in the Curriculum Page 33CHAPTER FIVE. FOLLOW-UP TO YOUR WORKSHOP 5.1 Using your workshop outputs Page 37 5.2 More help and resources Page 39CHAPTER SIX. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Page 40APPENDIX 01. CREATING YOUR OWN WORKSHOP MATERIALS A1 Printing and preparing workshop theme cards Page 43 A2 Printing and preparing timeline worksheets Page 43 A2.1 Make your own worksheet using flipchart pages Page 44 1
  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARYWelcome to the Viewpoints Handbook, which is designed to help you withcurriculum design, at module or whole-course level.This handbook will give you all the information you need to run a curriculum designworkshop with your course team, using our reflective resources – a learner timelineworksheet and best-practice pedagogical principles based around four themes –Assessment and Feedback, Information Skills, Learner Engagement and Creativity inthe Curriculum.Chapter 1 gives you a brief summary of the Viewpoints approach, its purpose, andthe benefits of holding a Viewpoints curriculum design workshop.Chapter 2 explains who might find this Handbook useful, and details all thecurriculum design resources available in the associated Download Pack (which canbe downloaded, free of charge, at http://viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk/resources.) Auseful one-page flowchart at the end of this chapter helps guide you through the useof Viewpoints materials and the associated information in the Handbook, and makesa good starting point for anyone thinking of planning a workshop on curriculumdesign.Chapter 3 provides a useful step-by-step information on running your ownworkshop, including detailed summary plans (for module or course levelworkshops), guidelines for workshop preparation, hints and tips on running asuccessful workshop, details of where to get copies of necessary workshopresources, and workshop roles.Chapter 4 outlines the four themes in more detail, and explains the source of theirunderpinning best-practice pedagogical principles.Chapter 5 tells you what to do with your workshop outputs, and where to go formore information.Chapter 6 has a list of acknowledgments of all stakeholders and expert guidancereceived, which has been fundamental in developing the Viewpoints approach tocurriculum design.Finally, Appendix 01 explains how to create your own workshop materials, if youcannot get access to original course worksheet timelines and theme cards (asdescribed in Chapter 3).We hope you find this Handbook useful! If you have any comments, questions orsuggestions then contact us on tfl@ulster.ac.uk. 2
  • CHAPTER ONE. VIEWPOINTS – INTRODUCTION - WHAT WE DO1.1 VIEWPOINTS AND CURRICULUM DESIGNViewpoints is a JISC-funded curriculum design project at the University of Ulster.We aim to help teaching staff create innovative, student-centred course designs.We have created a series of user-friendly themed workshop resources to help courseteams reflect, discuss, and plan effective curriculum designs.The resources use a learner timeline along with best-practice educational principlesto help course staff think about important stages in the learning process forstudents.1.2 THE VIEWPOINTS PROCESSOur workshop is built around a three-part framework to inform, inspire and helpacademics plan curriculum design.1. We inform by giving you access to principles of good practice in curriculum design. Viewpoints poster, illustrating our ‘Inform-Inspire-Plan’ process 3
  • 2. We inspire by encouraging you to use suggested best practice examples in your designs. Viewpoints Assessment and Feedback cards, with best practice pedagogical principles on each3. Our workshop helps you plan your subsequent learning design based on these principles and examples. Photo of a Viewpoints workshop output – a completed timeline worksheet 4
  • 1.3 WORKSHOP PURPOSEViewpoints have produced a simple but effective curriculum design workshop andsupporting resources, free for you to use. These can help teaching staff to: • create/design a new course or module for approval; • revise a course or module; • plan for course revalidation.This Handbook will explain how to use these resources and will show you, step-by-step, how to deliver your own curriculum design workshop to plan your courses.1.4 BENEFITS OF HAVING A VIEWPOINTS WORKSHOP Academics in a Viewpoints workshop reading and discussing the examplesCurriculum development• The workshop helps teams prepare for the complex course design process.• It provides a simple, but comprehensive approach to curriculum planning.• Viewpoints workshop outputs can be used for evidence for revalidation panels.Participant feedback: “…a simple yet comprehensive approach to the priorities ofcurriculum planning.” (March, 2011) 5
  • Value for course teams• The workshop allows for creative discussion and sharing of ideas around course design.• The process is built around reflection and effective team communication.• Course teams can focus on shared priorities.• It enhances effective teamwork/strengthens team building.Participant feedback: “It was useful to work in a common environment with othercourse teams and consider comparative approaches.” (December, 2010)Value for students (the learner perspective)• The workshop focuses attention on the learner experience.• It is built around a central student timeline, and the workshop themes consider key student interactions – leading to more learner-focused courses.Participant feedback: “As I did [the workshop] with students who had completed thecourse I received immediate feedback on what would be useful/beneficial”. (January,2010)Easy-to-use, quality resources• Workshop resources are based on sound best-practice educational principles (see Chapter 4, Themes for your workshop).• Resources are simple to use.• All resources are free and reusable.• Staff are given links to other useful quality resources to help with curriculum design.Participant feedback: “Viewpoints are able to link us up with the correct resources anduse them as best we can.” (January, 2010)1.5 FOUR THEMES, TWO VIEWSWe emphasise four different aspects of course design: 1. Assessment and Feedback; 2. Information Skills; 3. Learner Engagement; 4. Creativity and Innovation. 6
  • Assessment and Feedback sample card Information Skills sample card Learner Engagement sample card Creativity in the Curriculum sample cardYour curriculum design workshop can focus on one of these themes, or acombination of them.You can concentrate on module or whole-course level in your workshop. Someworkshops may have a combination of both approaches.The workshop is focused around a student timeline framework, which helpsconcentrate attention on the learner experience.Course teams ‘storyboard’ their course plans on this student timeline, based on oneor more of the four different themes.You’ll get a summary description of the workshop process and detailed instructionsfor running your own workshop in Chapter Three – Giving a workshop. 7
  • CHAPTER TWO. USING THE VIEWPOINTS HANDBOOK2.1 WHO CAN USE THIS HANDBOOK?This handbook will be useful to anyone who is involved in educational course design– from planning an activity or assessment for a class, to amending a module,creating a new course, preparing for revalidation or for an annual course review.Educational staff (and students) who could benefit from using these materialsinclude:• Course directors• Module coordinators• Subject teams• Teaching staff and their students• Staff Development• Subject librarians• Students’ Union groups/representatives2.2 WHAT RESOURCES ARE INCLUDED WITH THIS HANDBOOK?In addition to this handbook, there is a download pack available (compressed in ZIPformat) which contains all the resources you’ll need to have your own curriculumdesign workshop with colleagues.From facilitator crib sheets to printable cards, permission forms and presentationtemplates for your workshop, all the resources are readily available, reusable andfree of charge! Download all the information from the following URL:http://viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk/resources.2.3 CONTENTS OF DOWNLOAD PACKModule workshop resourcesUse this set of resources if you are running a module-level workshop.• Facilitator crib sheet – simple, concise 1-page instructions for running a module-level workshop.• Module cards – there are 4 sets of themed cards, related to the themes of Assessment and Feedback, Creativity, Information Skills and Learner Engagement, to be applied to module (re)design. 8
  • • Module timeline (A4) – example of the layout of a module timeline worksheet (miniature version, for reference only).• Sample permission form – get workshop members to sign this form before the workshop begins, if you’re taking photos or videos that will feature their image.• Supporting resources – Quality resources/links for each of the four themes.• Sample module outputs – a PowerPoint file with photos of module workshops in the University of Ulster – for reference.• Workshop output template (Word document) –this template can be used to record and type up notes, based on the module timeline worksheet completed by the group.• Template for module workshop presentation – a PowerPoint template for a Viewpoints workshop, which you can adapt slightly for use with your own team.Course workshop resourcesUse this set of resources if you are running a course-level workshop.• Facilitator crib sheet – simple, concise 1-page instructions for running a course-level workshop.• Course level cards – there are 4 sets of themed course-level cards, related to the themes of Assessment and Feedback, Creativity, Information Skills and Learner Engagement, to be applied to course (re)design.• Course timeline (A4) – example of the layout of a course timeline worksheet (miniature version, for reference only).• Sample permission form – get workshop members to sign this form before the workshop begins, if you’re taking photos or videos that will feature their image.• Supporting resources – links and further information for each of the four themes.• Workshop output template (Word document) – this template can be used to record and type up notes, based on the course timeline worksheet completed by the group.• Template for course workshop presentation – a PowerPoint template for use in a Viewpoints workshop, which you can adapt for use with your own team.• Diagrams of course design processes – diagrams that explain the processes of new course design, module design, revalidation etc. at the University of Ulster.We’ll explain how to use these resources in detail in Chapters 3 and 4 of thisHandbook. 9
  • 2.4 WHAT DO YOU WANT TO DO? Figure 1 The main steps in the Viewpoints curriculum design process 10
  • CHAPTER THREE. HOLDING A WORKSHOP3.1 TYPICAL WORKSHOP FORMAT (MODULE-LEVEL)Time needed: roughly 1.5 hoursThis facilitator’s ‘crib sheet’ is also available within the Download Pack, (Modulesection) along with a PowerPoint workshop presentation template.ACTIVITY INSTRUCTIONS TIME/ROLEWorkshop Briefly introduce the Viewpoints tools and resources, 5 minsintroduction and show a few examples of how they can be used for curriculum design at module level. (Facilitator, (Show PowerPoint presentation slides - Introduction) group coordinator)Session outline Introduce the workshop tasks one by one. Tell the 5 mins groups what they will be doing at each stage. (Facilitator) (Show PowerPoint presentation slides– Session Outline)Task 1 Each group considers their key challenge and agrees an 10 mins objective for the session. They record the objective onAgree objective the module timeline worksheet. (Groups)Task 2 Groups select one of the four themes to consider for 10 mins their objective (either Assessment and Feedback,Choose one Information Skills, Learner Engagement or Creativity). If (Groups)theme there is a chance, Tasks 1 and 2 could be done pre- workshop, to save time.Task 3 Groups read the front of their chosen set of theme cards 10 mins (one principle per card). They select theChoose selected cards/principles that can help them address their (Groups)principles objective.Task 4 Groups map selected principles to the timeline and (if 15 mins relevant) prioritise them. (Note: they can place the sameMap principles cards in more than one place on the timeline) (Groups)to timelineTask 5 Groups turn over the cards on the timeline, to display 15 mins the relevant examples on the reverse. (Note: if time’sSelect examples short, they should only turn over the most important (Groups) cards). They tick the examples that could support their objective. Then they should stick cards on the timeline using Blu-Tack (or any other sticky stuff), for presentation later.Task 6 Groups discuss how their ideas could be used in 10 mins teaching practice. They write on the worksheet usingReview ideas & Post-its or markers. (Groups)write planTask 7 Groups agree any final reflections and action points to 10 mins take forward. They record this on the student timeline.Action points (Groups)Task 8 One or two members from each group present their 5 min/group completed worksheet and briefly feed back on theirShare plans progress/conclusions. (Individuals from groups) 11
  • CHAPTER THREE. HOLDING A WORKSHOP3.2 TYPICAL WORKSHOP FORMAT (COURSE-LEVEL)Time needed: roughly 1.5 hoursThis facilitator’s ‘crib sheet’ is also available within the Download Pack, (Coursesection) along with a PowerPoint workshop presentation.ACTIVITY INSTRUCTIONS TIME/ROLEWorkshop Briefly introduce the Viewpoints tools and resources, 5 minsintroduction and show a few examples of how they can be used for curriculum design at course level. (Facilitator, (Show PowerPoint presentation slides - Introduction) group coordinator)Session outline Introduce the workshop tasks one by one. Tell the 5 mins groups what they will be doing at each stage. (Facilitator) (Show PowerPoint presentation slides – Session Outline)Task 1 Each group considers their key challenge and agrees an 10 mins objective for the session. They record the objective onAgree objective the course timeline worksheet. (Groups) If there is a chance, Task 1 could be done pre-workshop, to save time.Task 2 Groups read all the course-level theme cards with their 15 mins objective in mind (Assessment and Feedback,Consider themes Information Skills, Learner Engagement and Creativity). (Groups) They discuss – do they need to redesign anything around these themes? (e.g. assessment workloads throughout the course, or information skills needs over time). They select the themes that are important to their objective at course level.Task 3 Groups decide what parts of the course (which 15 mins modules/semesters) they might like to redesign aroundMap themes to these themes. (Groups,modules / facilitator)semesters (Note: give groups the module-level cards and examples to read, for more clarity). Teams note down ideas (on Post-its) in the relevant course area.Task 4 Groups discuss how their ideas could be implemented in 15 mins their teaching practice. They write their plans below theReview ideas / Post-its on the timeline, using markers. (Groups)Write planTask 5 Groups agree any final reflections and action points to 10 mins take forward. They record this on timeline.Action points (Groups)Task 6 One or two members from each group presents their 5 min/group completed course timeline worksheet and briefly feedsShare plans back on their progress/conclusions. (Individuals from groups) 12
  • 3.3 ESSENTIAL WORKSHOP PREPARATIONBefore you start 1. Book your room (based on the number of attendees) and check out size and layout beforehand. 2. Work out how many groups you will have (and therefore, how many tables/resources you’ll need), based on the number of people attending the workshop. As a general rule, you could have five or six people per group/table. Smaller groups of three or four people also work, but bear in mind larger groups might be less productive, so keep them small if possible. 3. You may have to rearrange the room layout (putting tables and chairs in clusters for each group, and laying out workshop materials on each table) so leave extra time for that before the workshop starts. 4. Check that the tables in the room are appropriate for the size of the worksheets, which will be laid flat on each table. Smaller, round tables can cause a problem. Fixed small tables (such as fixed single desks) are not suitable. 5. Test any technology you need beforehand (e.g. laptop with projector, PowerPoint slides, digital video camera, digital camera batteries or audio equipment, if using.) If you’re using the Viewpoints PowerPoint template from the Download Pack, be sure to edit it to include your own team’s information. 6. If possible, share the themed card sets beforehand with groups, so that they are familiar with them. There is a lot of information, especially on some of the module-level cards, so it helps to be familiar with them before the workshop if possible. 7. If there’s time, agree your objectives or key challenges with the group members prior to the workshop, and (if holding a module-level workshop) decide which of the four themes you’re going to focus on. This will give you more time for discussion during the workshop itself. Photo of groups in a workshop setting 13
  • Arranging the roomArrange tables in the room with workshop materials for each group. It should beeasy for the group leader and participants to move around the worksheets andtables. Photo of a blank timeline worksheetEach table should have the following materials on it: 1. 1 large course or module timeline sheet. 2. If you’re holding a module-level workshop, you’ll need 4 sets of your chosen module theme card per team (e.g. 4 sets of Information Skills cards for each group). You only need to bring the card sets for your chosen theme. It’s easiest to focus on only one theme at a time for a module workshop – too many cards/themes can make your workshop confusing and too time- consuming. 3. If you’re doing a course-level workshop, each group will need 1 printed course card per theme (i.e. 1 Assessment and Feedback course card, 1 Creativity course card, 1 Information Skills course card, and 1 Learner Engagement course card). It’s advisable to carry a set of each of the module- level cards as well, for reference. 4. Dry-wipe whiteboard marker pens for writing on the timeline worksheet. (Ordinary markers will indelibly mark the reusable laminate worksheets, so they are not suitable. However, if you’re using your own paper worksheets, then you can use normal markers.) 5. Several packs of Post-its and pens for each group. 6. Blu-Tack (to stick completed cards to the timeline, for presentation at the end).If you have more participants, remember to scale up the resources needed – forexample, if you have 18 participants and have decided to divide them into threegroups in your workshop, you will need 3 timeline sheets, 12 printed module cardsper theme, extra Post-its and markers, etc. 14
  • 3.4 ESSENTIAL WORKSHOP RESOURCESWorkshop PowerPoint slidesIn the Download Pack, there is a template PowerPoint presentation available thatfacilitators or group coordinators can use to introduce the workshop and theresources. Before the workshop, read the slides and edit them so that they suityour workshop plans and your available timeframe.Borrowing essential workshop resources1. One of the main resources you’ll need for the workshop is a timeline worksheet.There are a small number of reusable laminated worksheets available for use byUniversity of Ulster staff. Both module and course level worksheets are available onloan from Technology Facilitated Learning in Jordanstown. Image of a module-level timeline worksheet 15
  • If you want to borrow one of these large worksheets, contact Technology FacilitatedLearning on tfl@ulster.ac.uk, or alternatively telephone +44 28 90368434 to requestViewpoints workshop resources.Make sure to let them know at least a week in advance and specify: • Whether you need module or course-level worksheets; • How many timeline worksheets you need for your workshop.You can borrow the required number of worksheets, wipe them clean afterwards andreturn them to Technology Facilitated Learning.2. You will also need to borrow the required number of module or course-leveltheme card sets (see above, Arranging the room, for the required number ofcards).University of Ulster staff can borrow module or course cards for each theme fromTechnology Facilitated Learning, as before. Remember to tell them how many youneed to borrow, based on your workshop attendance numbers. Assessment and Feedback course card Information Skills course card Learner Engagement course card Creativity in the Curriculum course cardYou MUST return resources after use, so that other teams can have the chance touse them. 16
  • External teams needing resourcesIf you’re in another educational institution and want to use the workshop resources,you can contact the department of Technology Facilitated Learning in the Universityof Ulster on tfl@ulster.ac.uk.TFL can give you access to the original high-resolution files for printing cards andA0 timeline worksheets, on request. You can then arrange to have your own cardsand worksheet printed for you by a professional printer.These original printing files are also available via our website, athttp://viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk/resources. (Note: the file size of these professionalprinting files is very large, to ensure good print quality, so only use them if you arehaving worksheets and cards printed professionally).Resources – troubleshootingIf you can’t get access to any of the available resources in time for your workshop,then read Appendix 01 of this Handbook for guidance (Creating your ownworkshop materials). This guide tells you how to make your own resources, step-by-step, using source materials from the Download Pack.However, bear in mind that creating your own resources is time-consuming, soshould only be done if you have no other alternatives – set aside an afternoon tocreate and compile your resources, if you need to do this!You’ll need access to a printer (which prints double-sided, if possible), some glue ora stapler, scissors, A4 paper, A1 flipchart sheets, sticky tape and markers, as wellas the relevant Download Pack resources.3.5 ROLES IN A WORKSHOP – WHO DOES WHAT?Group coordinatorThis person is the main point of contact for the workshop. They can request aworkshop and liaise between the facilitator and the group members. They can alsohelp introduce the workshop with the facilitator.FacilitatorThe facilitator leads the workshop. They should help the group to discuss theirobjectives effectively, and help them to plan, using the workshop materials. Eachworkshop should take approximately 1.5 hours.As a facilitator you will need to do the following: • Introduce the session (along with the group coordinator, if there is one). 17
  • • Keep an eye on the time (moving people on to the next task if they are spending too long on one part of the workshop). However, be flexible. You don’t want to stop valuable contributions. • Try to encourage all group members to contribute. • Keep participants focused.Use the facilitator crib sheet (included in your Download Pack) to remind you ofwhat you need to do during the workshop.Group membersThere will be five or six group members per group in the workshop (depending oncourse team size, of course. Smaller teams are possible.)Group members are responsible for discussing and recording their objectives andplans for their module/course redesign, with guidance from the workshop facilitator.They use course or module theme cards, the student timeline worksheet and theirsubsequent discussions and notes to come up with a themed plan for their course ormodule. 18
  • 3.6 RECORDING WORKSHOP OUTPUTSYou’ll need to keep a record of what was discussed in your workshop. • You can do this by taking a digital photograph of your completed timeline worksheet. This will give you a record of your discussion as visual output, which you can then paste into a Word document and circulate. To take a photo of the whole timeline, you can put the worksheet on the floor and take a photo standing from above. Photograph of a sample worksheet output from a Viewpoints workshop • If you have time, type up your chosen examples and notes from this digital photograph. You will then have a written record of your discussions which you can use as groundwork evidence for course redesign. You will find a blank template in the Download Pack (Word document format). Download all the Viewpoints resources from http://viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk/resources. 19
  • • If possible, you could photograph the workshop sessions at different stages of the process, and video the final workshop task, when one or two members from each group briefly feed back on their progress. However, this is not essential.• If you are capturing photos or videos of your groups, it’s important to make sure that all participants have read, understood and signed the image permission form provided in the Download Pack. Do NOT use images of any staff member who has not consented to use of their image – this is unethical. Image of a sample permission form 20
  • 3.7 HINTS AND TIPSHere are some useful tips that may help facilitators when delivering workshops.These tips have come from the Viewpoints workshop team and their own extensiveexperience of planning and delivering course design workshops, so they are basedon real-world examples. 1. Emphasise the fact that the cards are only prompts. They are there as guides to help in the discussion of one of the four key curriculum development themes. 2. Emphasise that the timelines are only prompts as well, and can be adapted to suit course teams’ needs. 3. Choose the objective and the theme before the workshop, if possible. This will free up time for detailed discussion and tailored planning. 4. Distribute copies of the cards to groups beforehand, so that they are familiar with the principles and examples before the workshop - so this can prevent information overload. 5. If you can’t get hold of the timeline worksheets or card sets, read Appendix 01 of this Handbook, a troubleshooting section that will show you how to make your own resources. Set aside sufficient time (e.g. an afternoon) to create the necessary resources, and make sure you have all the materials to hand. 6. If groups are using the same card at different points on the student timeline, suggest to them that they’ll probably want to use different examples at different points. 7. Let groups know that there are no right/wrong answers, and encourage them to record any of their own ideas not listed. 8. Students can work well within the Viewpoints process as it is so learner- focused – and can provide valuable input and a fresh perspective to group discussions. 9. Timings given for the workshops are only suggestions. They are best used as prompts to keep the slowest groups on schedule. (It’s common for some groups to work ahead of the suggested schedule – let them move to the next task, if that’s the case). 10. In workshops, some people may find it more useful to work alone or in pairs. Be flexible and do whatever works best for your teams (or whatever you have enough resources for). Make sure smaller groups or individuals still share their findings with other team members. 11. To save time in a module workshop, one person could take responsibility for reading out the examples for a selected principle, while another member could mark down the selected examples that apply at that stage. 12. Group members can use different coloured markers to record on the timeline (for example) their current teaching practice in one colour, and what they aspire to do in another. If they do this, remind them to add a colour key to their worksheet. 13. Make use of written and photographed outputs in your planning. Don’t have a good creative discussion and then forget to record anything. Essential information may be lost! 21
  • 14. If you’re recording photos or videos of your session, be sure to get ALL participants to complete the image permission sheet from the Download pack. Go to each group member individually to collect their completed permission sheets, so you can identify which members have not consented to their image being used.15. Don’t schedule workshops for a Friday afternoon – group members will most likely be tired and demotivated!16. Providing refreshments (such as tea, coffee and scones or sandwiches) will help motivate your group to complete the intensive workshop process. 22
  • CHAPTER FOUR. THEMES FOR YOUR WORKSHOP4.1 ASSESSMENT AND FEEDBACKSummaryThe Assessment and Feedback theme will help you create an innovative assessmentand feedback strategy for a module or a course. Staff can use a set of ViewpointsAssessment and Feedback cards in their course planning, for inspiration and ideas.Pedagogical backgroundThe principles of good assessment and feedback practice are based on the REAPprinciples of good assessment design from the REAP project in Scotland. The cardsalso use the REAP implementation techniques from the QAA Enhancement Theme –The First Year Experience – Transforming Assessment and Feedback.Assessment and Feedback – the PrinciplesThere are nine principles of good assessment and feedback practice listed on theAssessment and Feedback prompt cards: • Clarify good performance • Encourage time and effort on task • Deliver high quality feedback • Provide opportunities to act on feedback • Encourage interaction and dialogue • Develop self-assessment and reflection • Give assessment choice • Encourage positive motivational beliefs • Inform and shape your teaching 23
  • Module level cardsThere are nine module level cards in a set. Each card is devoted to one particularprinciple of good assessment and feedback. Sample Assessment and Feedback module level card - front Sample Assessment and Feedback module level card - backA single Assessment and Feedback principle (for example, “Encourage time andeffort on task”) and a brief description of its meaning appears on the front of themodule card. When you turn the card over, you will see a list ofexamples/implementation ideas for that particular principle. 24
  • Staff can put these cards on the module timeline (repeating the same card at severaldifferent points if needed) and then turn the cards over and tick the relevantexamples, then note down their own ideas.Course level cardsThe front of the course level cards state their purpose (to help staff redesignassessment and feedback) and describe, briefly, effective assessment and feedbackpractice. Assessment and Feedback course level card - front Assessment and Feedback course level card - back 25
  • All nine principles of good assessment and feedback design appear on the back ofthe course level card.Academic staff using these cards in a course-planning workshop can place anAssessment and Feedback course card on the timeline worksheet as a prompt tohelp them consider the principles in relation to their course. They can then notedown their ideas on Assessment and Feedback on Post-its and place them wherethey are relevant at different points during the course.Finally, they can note down their own ideas and action points.Supporting handoutsUseful supporting handouts specific to the theme of Assessment and Feedback areavailable for download, from the Download Pack on the Viewpoints website.4.2 INFORMATION SKILLSSummaryThe Information Skills theme will help you think about your students’ informationskills needs (e.g. research/study skills) for a module or a course. Staff can use a setof Viewpoints Information Skills cards in their course planning.Subject librarians working with teaching staff or students can also use this theme toraise awareness of the how the demand for information skills is distributedthroughout a course or module.Pedagogical backgroundThe principles of good information skills management are based on the SCONULSeven Pillars Model of Information Literacy. The examples on the back of the modulelevel cards are adapted from Information Skills Benchmarks, a paper by PeterGodwin from the LIS. This paper has the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model as its basis. 26
  • Information Skills – the PrinciplesThere are seven principles of good information skills practice listed on theInformation Skills prompt cards: • Define the task and understand the topic • Identify appropriate resources • Search effectively • Find and extract information • Compare and analyse information • Organise and share information ethically • Interpret information and create new contentModule level cardsThere are seven module level cards in a set. Each card is devoted to one particularprinciple of good information skills design. Sample Information Skills module level card - front 27
  • Sample Information Skills module level card - backOne single principle (for example, “Find and extract information”) and a briefdescription of its meaning appears on the front of the card. When you turn the cardover, you will see a list of examples/implementation ideas for that particularprinciple. Staff can put these cards on the module timeline (repeating the same cardat several different points if needed) and then turn the cards over and tick therelevant examples, then note down their own ideas.Course level cardsThe front of the course level cards give a definition of what constitutes goodinformation skills and describe, briefly, how the cards will help staff come up with asound information skills strategy. Information Skills course level card - front 28
  • Information Skills course level card - backAll seven principles of good information skills design appear on the back of thecourse level card.Academic staff using these cards in a course planning workshop can place anInformation Skills card on the timeline worksheet in order to consider where in thecourse students will have a certain information skills need (e.g. they need to definetheir task, or organize the information they have gathered). They can then select thespecific Information Skills principles relevant to their course.Finally, they can note down their own ideas and action points.Supporting handoutsUseful supporting handouts specific to the theme of Information Skills are availablefor download, from the Download Pack on the Viewpoints website.4.3 LEARNER ENGAGEMENTSummaryThe Learner Engagement theme will help you think about how to create courses thatare engaging for students and learner-focused. Staff can use a set of ViewpointsLearner Engagement cards in their course planning for inspiration and ideas.Pedagogical backgroundThe principles of learner engagement are based upon the 8 Learning Events Modeldeveloped by LabSET, University of Liège, Belgium. 29
  • Learner Engagement – the conceptsThe Learner Engagement cards list eight teacher/learner interactions (learningevents), which can be applied to a course or module to enhance the learnerexperience: • Receive • Create • Debate • Explore • Experiment • Imitate • Practice • Meta-learn (Self-reflect)Module level cardsThere are eight module level cards in a set. Each card is devoted to one particularteaching and learning interaction. Sample Learner Engagement module level card - front 30
  • Sample Learner Engagement module level card - backOn the front of the card, there is one single learner/teacher interaction (for example,“Practice”) and a brief description of its meaning. When you turn the card over, youwill see a list of suggested resource types, sample interactions, possible tools andtechnologies to use and types of assessment.Note: the back of the ‘Receive’ and ‘Meta-learn’ cards are slightly different in formatand content to the rest of the module card set.In a workshop, staff can put these cards on the module timeline (repeating the samecard at several different points if needed) and then turn the cards over and tick therelevant examples, then note down their own ideas.Course level cardsThe front of the Learner Engagement course level cards state their purpose (to helpstaff identify possible teaching and learning interactions that support the learningprocess). 31
  • Learner Engagement course level card - front Learner Engagement course level card - backAll eight possible Learner Engagement interactions appear on the back of the courselevel card.Academic staff using these cards in a course-planning workshop can place a LearnerEngagement card on the timeline worksheet as a prompt to help them consider theprinciples in relation to their course. They can then select the specific LearnerEngagement interactions relevant at different points in their course. Finally, theycan note down their own ideas and action points.Supporting handoutsUseful supporting handouts specific to the theme of Learner Engagement areavailable for download, from the Download Pack on the Viewpoints website. 32
  • 4.4 CREATIVITY IN THE CURRICULUMSummaryThe Creativity in the Curriculum theme will help you incorporate creativity andinnovation into a module or a course. Staff can use Viewpoints Creativity cards intheir course planning, to help inspire them to make courses more innovative forstudents.Pedagogical backgroundThe Creativity principles listed on these cards are adapted from the work of theUniversity of Ulster’s Centre for Higher Education Practice ‘Creativity in theCurriculum’ group.Creativity in the Curriculum – the PrinciplesThere are nine creativity ideas listed on the Creativity in the Curriculum promptcards: • Enquiry-based learning • ‘Open-box’ modules • Negotiation • ‘Real-life’ learning situations • Novel approaches to tasks • Assessment that focuses on process • Use of debates • Beyond the discipline • Collaborative learning 33
  • Module level cardsThere are nine module level cards in a set. Each card is devoted to one particularCreativity principle. Sample Creativity module level card – frontOne Creativity principle (for example, “Enquiry-based learning”) and a briefdescription of its meaning appears on the front of a card.Examples and implementation ideas for the back of the module cards are currentlybeing developed for the Creativity theme, in conjunction with the University ofUlster’s Creativity in the Curriculum group.Staff can put these cards on the module timeline (repeating the same card at severaldifferent points if needed) and then note down their own ideas. 34
  • Course level cardsThe front of the course level cards explain what is meant by the term ‘Creativity inthe Curriculum’ and briefly describe how the cards identify examples of creative /innovative teaching practice, as well as fostering student creativity. Creativity course level card - front Creativity course level card - backAll nine principles of creative course design appear on the back of the course levelcard.Academic staff using these cards in a course-planning workshop can place aCreativity card on the timeline worksheet as a prompt to help them consider theprinciples in relation to their course. 35
  • They can then select the specific Creativity principles relevant to their course andnote down their own notes.Finally, they can note down their own specific ideas and action points.Supporting handoutsUseful supporting handouts specific to the theme of creativity and innovation areavailable for download, from the Download Pack on the Viewpoints website. 36
  • CHAPTER FIVE. FOLLOW-UP TO YOUR WORKSHOP5.1 USING YOUR WORKSHOP OUTPUTSOnce you’ve held your curriculum design workshop, you should then have atangible output to use. This will be a completed curriculum timeline (either atmodule or course level) with your course design objective, theme cards (such asInformation Skills) attached to it, relevant examples ticked and your own notes andaction points noted down. Photo of a finished workshop output – a completed timeline worksheetAs a record, we recommend you take a photograph of your completed curriculumtimeline. You can then paste it into a Word document and circulate amongst yourcolleagues, to remind yourselves of what you discussed, and what plans you made.What should you do next with this output?Completing a Viewpoints workshop is really the beginning of a process – kick-starting an important discussion that you and your colleagues need to have aboutcurriculum design. 37
  • If you have time, it could be useful to type up the points discussed in the workshop,so that you have a printed summary of your plans.The Download Pack includes a simple workshop output template, in Word format,which can be used to record and type up all your notes from your worksheet, basedon your module timeline worksheet. Image of a sample typed-up output from a Viewpoints workshop sessionSuggested usesUse your completed timeline: • As a basis for deeper discussion on module/course (re)design. • To see where your course might have gaps/needs (e.g. where you might need more defined assessment and feedback at any point). 38
  • • As evidence for course validation committees. • As a foundation for writing supporting course documents, when documenting a new course or planning a module.5.2 MORE HELP AND RESOURCESViewpoints have compiled a series of help resources to help you with yourcurriculum design.These resources link to more quality resources around the themes of Assessmentand Feedback, Creativity, Information Skills and Student Engagement.These are available as part of the download pack mentioned in Chapter Two.Download the full set of help resources, templates and printables fromhttp://viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk/resources. 39
  • CHAPTER SIX. ACKNOWLEDGMENTSJISC Curriculum Design Cluster CFor expert guidance, we are indebted to our project funders, JISC, as well as theadvice and guidance of our project’s Critical Friend, Peter Bullen, EmeritusProfessor at the University of Hertfordshire, previous Director of the BlendedLearning Unit, and former head of their CETL/Ford Professor of AutomotiveEngineering.The direction and focus of the Viewpoints project has been informed and influencedby the critical feedback from our Viewpoints Steering group, which met once aquarter for the duration of the project, to discuss Viewpoints developments, reports,prototypes, workshops and institutional embedding.Our project has benefited greatly from the feedback and support of our JISC projectpartners in JISC Curriculum Design Cluster C: • the PiP project (Principles in Patterns) in Strathclyde, which is developing a new technology-supported approach to curriculum design at the University of Strathclyde; • OULDI at the Open University (the Open University Learning Design Initiative, which aims to develop and implement a methodology for learning design.Stakeholders in the Viewpoints projectThe Viewpoints project has also been influenced by feedback and evaluation fromimportant stakeholders within the University. Feedback has come in the form ofconsultations, presentations, one-to-one meetings, workshops, pilot sessions(mainly with Ulster staff, and a few students) and internal/external dissemination.Our stakeholders throughout the project have included the following key partners inthe University of Ulster: • Academic Staff • Heads of School • PVC (Teaching and Learning) • Students • Academic Office • Quality Management and Audit Unit • Staff Development • Centre for Higher Education Practice • The Department of Access and Distributed Learning • Student Support 40
  • • Ulster Library • Student Marketing • International Office • Career Development CentreThe REAP Project (Assessment and Feedback)The nine Assessment and Feedback principles in our Assessment and Feedbacktheme were based on the REAP principles of good assessment design from the REAPproject in Scotland.The cards also use the REAP implementation techniques from the QAAEnhancement Theme – The First Year Experience – Transforming Assessment andFeedback.REAP stands for Re-engineering Assessment Practices. REAP piloted the redesign offormative assessment and feedback practices across these three institutions.The three REAP partners involved were the University of Strathclyde (lead), theUniversity of Glasgow and Glasgow Caledonian University.In January 2011, the University of Ulster set up a Working Group on Assessmentand Feedback for Learning. (For more detailed information, read the 2011 UlsterTeaching and Learning paper, Assessment and Feedback for Learning).Professor Denise McAllister, the Teaching and Learning PVC, helped establish thisgroup (along with the Centre for Higher Education Practice) as a response to Ulster’spoor performance in the 2010 National Student Survey as regards assessment.The aim of the Working Group is to create a set of assessment principles forUniversity practitioners in every faculty to embed into practice.This group adopted a subset of the REAP Principles of good assessment design toembed into university practice.Viewpoints resources are aligned with this initiative through the use of the REAPprinciples and common summary descriptions. This will allow our Assessment andFeedback cards to be embedded into practice throughout the University.SCONUL Seven Pillars of Information Literacy (Information Skills)The seven principles of information skills management developed for this theme arebased on the SCONUL Seven Pillars Model of Information Literacy.The Seven Pillars Model was designed to be a practical working model and containsideas about the range of information skills needed in higher education, as well astouching on the relationship between information skills and IT skills.It also considers the notion of progression in higher education (from first year up toresearch level) and the growing development of information skills needed. 41
  • The examples on the back of the cards use and adapt information from InformationSkills Benchmarks, a paper by Peter Godwin from the LIS, itself based on theSCONUL Seven Pillars Model.The subject and subject assistant librarians at the University of Ulster have beeninvaluable in their help and continuing support in revising and amending iterationsof the theme text, suggesting revisions to the wording of examples and coming upwith relevant alternatives.8 Learning Events Model (Learner Engagement)The Learner Engagement theme is based upon the 8 Learning Events Modeldeveloped by LabSET, University of Liège, Belgium.The 8 Learning Events Model (8LEM) documents 8 specific ways of teaching andlearning. The model connects the students needs and the teachers provision, andconsiders their interactions. Learner and teacher actions are complementary andinterdependent.CHEP Creativity in the Curriculum group (Creativity)The nine creativity prompts within the Viewpoints Creativity theme are derived fromthe work of the University’s Creativity in the Curriculum Group, via the Centre forHigher Education Practice (CHEP).The Creativity in the Curriculum group is building on work produced by Ulster’sWorking Group on Creativity and Innovation in the Curriculum in 2007.The current CHEP Creativity project aims to identify innovative practice across theUniversity, and also tries to promote ways of developing student creativity withinsubject curricula. 42
  • APPENDIX 01 CREATING YOUR OWN WORKSHOP MATERIALSA1. Printing and preparing workshop theme cardsFor each table, (if you’re doing a module workshop) you will need four sets of thetheme cards you have pre-selected with your groups. If you’re doing a course-levelworkshop, you’ll need one set of each of the themed course-level cards per group.For example, if you’re looking at Assessment and Feedback in your module-levelworkshop and you have two tables, you will need to print out 4 x 2 sets of each cardin the Assessment and Feedback theme pack = 8 copies of each card.From your download pack, select the relevant level of workshop (module or course)and the correct set of cards for your objective (Assessment and Feedback, Creativity,Information Skills or Learner Engagement). These card sets will be in the form ofPDFs. 1. Open the relevant PDF (e.g. AssessmentFeedback_module.pdf) and choose File>Print. 2. When your printing options come up on your computer screen, print two to a page and (if your printer supports this option) choose double-sided printing (front and back). Print the required number of each card set – 4, 8 or other multiples. 3. If your printer doesn’t support double-sided printing, you can glue/staple pages together to join the front and the back of cards. Match up the titles of cards to get the front and back of each card. 4. Cut the cards to size (using scissors or a guillotine if you have one) and glue or staple together if necessary.A2. Printing and preparing timeline worksheetsYou will need one or more timeline worksheets for your workshop – either module orcourse-level, depending on what you want to work on. Each group (averaging 5 or 6people per group) will need one timeline worksheet.These worksheets are A0 size (i.e. 16 times the size of an A4 page, or two times thesize of a large flipchart) so it is not possible to print these on a standard printer,unless you have specialist equipment.You have a few different options for preparing worksheets for a workshop. Bear inmind it will take a bit of time (at least an afternoon), to prepare all these resources,so remember to factor this into your workshop preparations. 43
  • A2.1 Make your own worksheet using flipchart pagesFor this you will need: • Two A1-size flipchart blank pages • One marker pen • Sticky tape • A copy of the A4 module or course-level timeline (mini version), for reference, to help you with the layout.Instructions a. Put the flipchart pages together – arranged landscape orientation, i.e. their longest sides joining together. b. Stick the long sides together using Sticky tape. 44
  • c. Turn the page over and take out the small A4 example worksheet – this will guide you in creating the layout of your worksheet.d. Write your section titles on your worksheet, in roughly the same relative position as the example worksheet. At the top, you will write Module or Course as a heading (depending on which level you’re working with.) The next title is ‘Objective’ – the reason for your workshop redesign. Then, divide the worksheet into four equal sections – for module level, this is Induction, First Few Weeks, Mid-semester and Final Phase. (For course level, this will be Year 1, Year 2, Year 3 and Year 4). Finally, write the title ‘Action Points’ at the very bottom of the sheet. 45
  • e. If you wish, divide off the sections using tape or a pen and ruler, so that you have distinct sections on your worksheet.f. You’re ready to start using your worksheet – as described in Chapter 3 - placing cards (which you should have already printed out) on the timeline and writing your own notes below. 46
  • http://viewpoints.ulster.ac.uk/resources