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Solid works training for beginners   view manipulation, part 4 (1)
Solid works training for beginners   view manipulation, part 4 (1)
Solid works training for beginners   view manipulation, part 4 (1)
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Solid works training for beginners view manipulation, part 4 (1)

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Welcome back. This is a SolidWorks Tutorials series for beginners, and in this article we'll continue with view manipulation tools. Understanding and using these tools fluidly is important. As a new …

Welcome back. This is a SolidWorks Tutorials series for beginners, and in this article we'll continue with view manipulation tools. Understanding and using these tools fluidly is important. As a new SolidWorks user, the way to increase your productivity is to reduce the number of mouse movements and just overall annoying mousing around, period! When you can control the view manipulation tools with dexterity, you speed up your work process and flow significantly!

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  • 1. SolidWorks Training for Beginners - View Manipulation, Part 4 Welcome back. This is a SolidWorks Tutorials series for beginners, and in this article we'll continue with view manipulation tools. Understanding and using these tools fluidly is important. As a new SolidWorks user, the way to increase your productivity is to reduce the number of mouse movements and just overall annoying mousing around, period! When you can control the view manipulation tools with dexterity, you speed up your work process and flow significantly! In our previous SolidWorks tutorials, we'd talked about zoom tools, panning, rotating, previous view and section view. In this article, I'll talk about the View Orientation presets. SolidWorks offers a number of very useful presets that are pretty clearly labeled by the image on the button. First is Top View. This shows you a bird's eye view of your model, as if you are standing on top of it. Next is Isometric View. If you select this, SolidWorks rotates and zooms your model to isometric view. What's isometric view? Well, that's a bit more complicated to explain. Basically it's the easiest way to get a good look at your model with some 3D perspective coded into the presentation. (Good ole Wikipedia tells me that "isometric projection is a method for visually representing three-dimensional objects in two dimensions in technical and engineering drawings. It is an axonometric projection in which the three coordinate axes appear equally foreshortened and the angles between any two of them are 120 degrees.")
  • 2. By the way, each of these views also has a keyboard short cut that you will probably memorize if you use a view frequently. I use Isometric view a lot, and generally will just CTRL-7 to take me there without any mouse movements. Next is a trimetric view. Wikipedia tells me that in trimetric projection, the direction of viewing is such that all of the three axes of space appear unequally foreshortened. The scale along each of the three axes and the angles among them are determined separately as dictated by the angle of viewing. Trimetric perspective is seldom used." The last view orientation type on the top row is the diametric view. What the heck is that? Well, In diametric projection, the direction of viewing is such that two of the three axes of space appear equally foreshortened, of which the attendant scale and angles of presentation are determined according to the angle of viewing; the scale of the third direction (vertical) is determined separately. Below these standard view types, we can choose a view from any side of the model. Imagine your model is suspended in a square room, and you can choose whether to see it from up top (Top View), down below (Bottom View), or from any side (to the left, to the right, from the front, from the back). You can easily choose any of these views from the View Orientation drop down menu. You can also create your own custom views. The last standardized view in the View Orientation drop down menu is Normal To. To use the Normal To option, you need to first click on a planar face in the graphic area, and then click Normal To. The result is that your view will be perpendicular to the selection so that "you'll be looking right at it." Imagine that you want to bring any face up to your eye level for viewing, like a book that's straight up and down in front of your face; that's what Normal To does. Basically, this makes your view perpendicular to whatever you select. Stay tuned for the next entry in this SolidWorks training for beginners series.
  • 3. About Us:- Video-tutorials.net is a family-based business that provides high quality video tutorial training in Computer Aided Design (CAD) software like Solidworks Tutorials, CATIA Tutorials, and Autodesk Inventor Tutorials and Autodesk AutoCAD tutorials. For more Information:- https://www.facebook.com/pages/Video-TutorialsNet/181276732005151?ref=hl https://twitter.com/videotutorials3 http://www.pinterest.com/videotutorials/ https://plus.google.com/+Video-tutorialsNet/posts http://www.youtube.com/user/videotutorials2/videos Contact details:- Video-Tutorials.Net 132-250 Shawville Blvd #136 Calgary, Alberta, Canada. Zipcode-T2Y 2Z7 Tel- 403.254.9622, Email- info@video-tutorials.net

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