EDUCATION INTELLIGENCE Knowing your international student audience: Implications of visa issues and fees
Overview <ul><li>The context: Internationally mobile students </li></ul><ul><li>What drives student mobility? </li></ul><u...
Nearly 50% of all mobile students study in one of 5 countries   (Global distribution of international students, 2008. From...
Combined Student Flows Sources: UIS and Project Atlas (IIE) – British Council, Global Gauge study Inbound students Outboun...
International students in the UK <ul><li>International students in the UK = 455,660 </li></ul><ul><li>continuous growth of...
Where do they come from? What do they study? <ul><li>India and China make up nearly 1/3 of non EU students in UK HE </li><...
Growth markets Source: HESA (2011)
New students <ul><li>First year enrolments are one of the most reliable indicators for the future direction of student enr...
Times are changing <ul><ul><li>fees introduced (wont directly affect non-EU students) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>visa chan...
Studying UK qualifications outside the UK - TNE <ul><ul><li>Data also collated by HESA (but a separate dataset) </li></ul>...
Studying UK qualifications outside the UK - TNE
TNE growth markets
So, what about the future? – Students in Motion <ul><li>Country specific forecasts – produced with the Economist Intellige...
Students in Motion <ul><li>British Council study looking at future student flows from different countries to the UK over t...
Expect a positive relationship between economic development (GDP per head) and enrolment in tertiary education:
Forecasting total enrolments in HE <ul><li>Stronger relationship between economic development and enrolment in emerging ma...
Flat rate in the world outward mobility Source: UNESCO and British Council analysis 1.8% 151,253,144 2007 1.8% 143,133,002...
Source: British Council Students in Motion (2011)
Visas <ul><li>Study of the impact of visa changes on student enrolment data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>US post 9/11 </li></ul><...
Pathways will be affected <ul><li>British Council analysis of UCAS data (application data 2010): </li></ul><ul><li>(Of tho...
Student Insight -- the Complexity of Choice <ul><li>There are real students behind the numbers and trend lines – each of t...
Student Insight: The Student Decision Making study <ul><li>Since 2007 the British Council have been exploiting their netwo...
Important factors in your decision to study overseas  (China, India, Nigeria). Experience Career Quality n=13,594 n=6,551 ...
Major influencers on your decision to study overseas <ul><li>Increasingly ‘It was my own decision’ and ‘Parents’ (both for...
Important factors when selecting institution: (Female, prospective PG Business Studies applicant) Source: British Council ...
Important factors when selecting city/location: (Female, prospective PG Business Studies applicant) Source: British Counci...
Student Insight - Summary <ul><li>Know your audience </li></ul><ul><li>Tailor messages </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of inf...
Education UK Challenge <ul><li>Multi-market </li></ul><ul><li>On and offline competition designed to profile the value of ...
Video showing the winners of Shine 2011 could not be transferred, but further details can be found here: http://www.educat...
The future <ul><li>Challenging times: </li></ul><ul><li>Students have more choice: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>increased provisi...
<ul><li>www.britishcouncil.org/educationintelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Michael Peak </li></ul><ul><li>0161 957 7194 </li><...
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Pr presentation city university june 2011 michael peak

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Michael Peak, British Council

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  • Important to set context as throughout this presentation the message is ‘know your audience’ I’m aware that some in this audience will know lots about what I have to say….but wish to set the context
  • 3.3 million internationally mobile students (according to UNESCO and OECD) We may be complacent as we have a well respected product and the English language…but things are changing…
  • Maybe talk around this to describe outbound/inbound analysis, and idea that trad. Senders are more dynamic compared to trad. Hosts (ie next 3 slides). Traditional sending countries - e.g. China, India, Korea, Malaysia and others - are increasingly hosting international students. The rate at which this is happening is faster for some than others – e.g. Malaysia moving very fast, followed by Korea and China Traditional host countries (UK, US, Australia) – not much movement. Expectation for greater outward mobility in the future which would contribute to more balanced student flows The countries in the middle – mainly European countries – show more a balanced approach in their inward and outward student flows. These are also countries heavily engaged in Erasmus mobility - hence greater exposure to study abroad Japan appears to be its own group – there is increased mobility towards Japan, however, outward mobility set to decline in absolute numbers related to the country demographics
  • Where do they come from What do they study First year marker – what does this show? (EUKP presentation)
  • &gt;1,000 students &gt;15% growth last year
  • Need to recruit 255315 new students just to stand still!
  • Context is set – what way are things going?
  • So, generally speaking: HE enrollment grows as GDP grows. As HE enrolment grows, the leakage rate is fairly stable (1.8-2%) – so international student mobility grows. Drivers to a particular country would include bilateral links, and also price determinants (exchange rates, tuition rates)
  • China compared to India
  • Beijing Guangzhou Hangzhou Shanghai Wuhan 155 54 35 88 35 Important factors differ from city to city. Beijing and Shanghai – Institution reputation Guangzhou – Quality of course Wuhan – career prospects
  • Beijing Guangzhou Hangzhou Shanghai Wuhan 155 54 35 88 35
  • Coventry University Business School Using business and marketing skills to managing a professional English football club for a season Developed with the Sport Marketing department of Coventry University Business School The Pitch is a sports management challenge that allows participating school students to demonstrate a range of skills that would be attractive to future employers. The competition will run first in China and later in the year in Thailand Students will be set a series of business related tasks that reflect the dilemmas that face professional football management teams, including deciding on a new shirt sponsor for the club, signing a new player and addressing whether the club will continue to play in its current ground in the future. First stages of the competition will take place online, with the live final taking place in November at the Ling Long Pagoda, on Beijing&apos;s Olympic Green Kingston University Scientists and artists working together to devise a series of events around the science of sleeping and dreaming University of Bristol Teams are required to design and construct an earthquake resistant model, with model buildings tested on an earthquake shaking table Doncaster College Teams are asked to design a bridge that will cope with increased volumes of traffic generated by a major international sporting event, whilst also considering the social and environmental impact to the local community of the construction
  • Pr presentation city university june 2011 michael peak

    1. 1. EDUCATION INTELLIGENCE Knowing your international student audience: Implications of visa issues and fees
    2. 2. Overview <ul><li>The context: Internationally mobile students </li></ul><ul><li>What drives student mobility? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>British Council research – Students in Motion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Visas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fees </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Student Insight: the decisions of prospective international students </li></ul><ul><li>British Council global campaigns – some examples </li></ul>
    3. 3. Nearly 50% of all mobile students study in one of 5 countries (Global distribution of international students, 2008. From OECD Education at a Glance 2010)
    4. 4. Combined Student Flows Sources: UIS and Project Atlas (IIE) – British Council, Global Gauge study Inbound students Outbound students
    5. 5. International students in the UK <ul><li>International students in the UK = 455,660 </li></ul><ul><li>continuous growth of international student enrolment in 2009/10, marking 10% increase: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>6% growth in the EU enrolments to the UK </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>11% growth in the non-EU enrolments to the UK </li></ul></ul><ul><li>PG growth of 10%, UG of 9%. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most pronounced growth at Postgraduate Taught level (13%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>42% PGR and 57% PGT students are international </li></ul>
    6. 6. Where do they come from? What do they study? <ul><li>India and China make up nearly 1/3 of non EU students in UK HE </li></ul><ul><li>The top 5 sending countries account for more than 50% of non-EU students </li></ul><ul><li>The PG/UG split is almost exactly 50/50 </li></ul><ul><li>Most popular subject area is Business and administrative studies (over 93,000 non-EU students in 2009-10). </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic and electrical engineering is most popular subject outside of Business disciplines. </li></ul>
    7. 7. Growth markets Source: HESA (2011)
    8. 8. New students <ul><li>First year enrolments are one of the most reliable indicators for the future direction of student enrolments. They grew by 11% in 2009/10 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Non-EU enrolments grew by 12% </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EU enrolments increased by 7% </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Countries with big growth in commencing students: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nepal (105%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Saudi Arabia (63%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kazakhstan (57%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>BUT: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>South Korea (-1%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Pakistan (-3%) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kenya (-5%) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Even though these markets grew overall </li></ul>
    9. 9. Times are changing <ul><ul><li>fees introduced (wont directly affect non-EU students) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>visa changes (perceptions of UK changing, ease of access changing) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>HE provision improving in traditional sending countries </li></ul></ul><ul><li>So institutions increasingly look to offer services/products in different ways </li></ul>
    10. 10. Studying UK qualifications outside the UK - TNE <ul><ul><li>Data also collated by HESA (but a separate dataset) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>UK qualifications now delivered in 223 countries outside of the UK </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>78 countries where: </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students studying UK qual in country ≥ students from that country travelling to UK </li></ul><ul><ul><li>12 countries where more than 5,000 extra students study a UK qual in that country (compared to in the UK) </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. Studying UK qualifications outside the UK - TNE
    12. 12. TNE growth markets
    13. 13. So, what about the future? – Students in Motion <ul><li>Country specific forecasts – produced with the Economist Intelligence Unit. Demand for study abroad is modelled on: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>demographic estimates </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>household income (cross-section of families with the right income and children at the right age) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>education provision at home – rate opting to study overseas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>macroeconomic determinants of demand for overseas study: income level, bilateral trade, exchange rate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>lag of almost 2 years to see impact of the above </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. Students in Motion <ul><li>British Council study looking at future student flows from different countries to the UK over the short- to mid-term </li></ul><ul><li>Countries investigated so far: China, India, Nigeria, Malaysia and USA </li></ul><ul><li>Several general findings were made: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>GDP per capita is the main driver for total higher education enrolment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>forecasts for students coming to the UK correlate strongly with </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>bilateral trade flows </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>local currency to £ exchange rate </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>tuition fees in the UK relative to other possible destination countries </li></ul></ul></ul>
    15. 15. Expect a positive relationship between economic development (GDP per head) and enrolment in tertiary education:
    16. 16. Forecasting total enrolments in HE <ul><li>Stronger relationship between economic development and enrolment in emerging markets: </li></ul>
    17. 17. Flat rate in the world outward mobility Source: UNESCO and British Council analysis 1.8% 151,253,144 2007 1.8% 143,133,002 2006 1.9% 135,925,247 2005 1.9% 129,690,294 2004 2.0% 122,085,254 2003 1.9% 113,669,904 2002 1.8% 104,103,583 2001 1.8% 97,205,098 2000 Internationally mobile students World HE enrolments  
    18. 18. Source: British Council Students in Motion (2011)
    19. 19. Visas <ul><li>Study of the impact of visa changes on student enrolment data </li></ul><ul><ul><li>US post 9/11 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Australia in 2010 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The outlook for the UK </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Perception, post-study work </li></ul>
    20. 20. Pathways will be affected <ul><li>British Council analysis of UCAS data (application data 2010): </li></ul><ul><li>(Of those applications from a known ‘application centre’): 54% of applications from non-EU domiciled applicants came from within the UK </li></ul><ul><li>- A large proportion of UG applicants are already in the UK when they apply! </li></ul>
    21. 21. Student Insight -- the Complexity of Choice <ul><li>There are real students behind the numbers and trend lines – each of them with hopes and aspirations for the future </li></ul><ul><li>A student’s choice is based on a complex mix depending on a wide variety of factors </li></ul><ul><li>Importance: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Verifying our knowledge about the market </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Turning anecdotal evidence into empirical evidence </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Capturing shifts in demand before students enrol </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allowing on-line tracking of student choice at city level </li></ul></ul>
    22. 22. Student Insight: The Student Decision Making study <ul><li>Since 2007 the British Council have been exploiting their network and reach to capture the views of prospective international students </li></ul><ul><li>Over 126,000 respondents from over 180 countries </li></ul><ul><li>UK institutions can access the raw data, at city-level, in (almost) real-time </li></ul>
    23. 23. Important factors in your decision to study overseas (China, India, Nigeria). Experience Career Quality n=13,594 n=6,551 n=1,828 Source: British Council Student Insight
    24. 24. Major influencers on your decision to study overseas <ul><li>Increasingly ‘It was my own decision’ and ‘Parents’ (both for PG and UG students) </li></ul><ul><li>Who suggested the institution(s)? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Friends, classmates, another family member </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Importance of word of mouth and use of alumni </li></ul>
    25. 25. Important factors when selecting institution: (Female, prospective PG Business Studies applicant) Source: British Council Student Insight (2011)
    26. 26. Important factors when selecting city/location: (Female, prospective PG Business Studies applicant) Source: British Council Student Insight (2011)
    27. 27. Student Insight - Summary <ul><li>Know your audience </li></ul><ul><li>Tailor messages </li></ul><ul><li>Importance of influencers and word of mouth…. </li></ul>
    28. 28. Education UK Challenge <ul><li>Multi-market </li></ul><ul><li>On and offline competition designed to profile the value of a UK education and our innovative teaching methods. </li></ul><ul><li>Teams from overseas institutions compete against each other in multi-disciplinary challenges created by UK institutions </li></ul>
    29. 29. Video showing the winners of Shine 2011 could not be transferred, but further details can be found here: http://www.educationuk.org http://www.educationuk.org/shine Shine!: The International Student Awards
    30. 30. The future <ul><li>Challenging times: </li></ul><ul><li>Students have more choice: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>increased provision at home; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing number of appealing host countries; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>trans-national qualifications; </li></ul></ul><ul><li>External factors: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visas (for non-EU students) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fees (for EU students) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exchange rates </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Can control (to some extent) student perceptions </li></ul><ul><li>“ International students” must not be lumped in the same basket (even within a single country) </li></ul><ul><li>Timely, tailored market info at city level is crucial </li></ul>
    31. 31. <ul><li>www.britishcouncil.org/educationintelligence </li></ul><ul><li>Michael Peak </li></ul><ul><li>0161 957 7194 </li></ul><ul><li>[email_address] </li></ul>
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