Addressing climate change
A role for Universities
(and Business Schools)
www.theccc.org.uk
Professor Julia King CBE FREng
...
The CCC was established December 1st
2008
2
The Committee on Climate
Change (CCC) is an independent
body established under...
3
The work of the CCC
4
● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets
● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery
● Building a Low Carbon Econo...
5
Required global emissions reduction
Required global emissions
reduction of 50%
• 20-24Gt CO2e in 2050
• 8-10Gt CO2e in 2...
6
Appropriate UK contribution
50% global reduction50% global reduction
Burden share
• Alternative methodologies: contract ...
7
2.1 – 2.4 tonnes of CO2 per annum
● A return flight to Los Angeles for one person currently
accounts for
2.5 tonnes
● An...
8
178
135
97
109
94
42
2007 emissions
International aviation
& international shipping*
UK non-CO2 GHGs
Other CO2
Industria...
9
The Carbon Budgets: ‘Interim’ legislated in May 2009,
move to ‘Intended’ budget to be reviewed in 2010
Interim: 34% cut ...
10
400
450
500
550
600
650
700
750
800
850
1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005...
11
2009 CCC Report: meeting budgets requires a
step change relative to recent progress
CO2 emissions fell 0.5%
annually 20...
12
Route to the required reductions
Reducing power sector emissions:
Renewables (wind, marine, biomass, solar), nuclear, C...
13
● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets
● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery
● Building a Low Carbon Econ...
Emissions fell 8.6% in 2009
CO2 9.7% Non-CO2 1.9%
CO2 Non-CO2GHG
CO2 emissions fell in all sectors,
particularly power and industry
(% change in 2009)
16
2009 CCC Report: meeting budgets requires a
step change relative to recent progress
CO2 emissions fell 0.5%
annually 20...
2010: possible to meet the Intended
budget through domestic effort alone
If impact of recession persists
and measures in C...
18
178
135
97
109
94
42
2007 emissions
International aviation
& international shipping*
UK non-CO2 GHGs
Other CO2
Industri...
19
Power is central to wider economy decarbonisation
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
0
100
200
300
400
500
600
2010 2015 2020 20...
20
By 2020 we need to deliver significant
investment in low-carbon generation
CCC indicative
scenario by 2020
23 GW new w...
21
● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets
● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery
● Building a Low Carbon Econ...
22
UK Energy RD&D
Source: IEA
UK is failing to exploit the
opportunities offered by a
low-carbon economy
23
● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets
● Progress in reducing emissions
● Key areas for new policies
● Power, E...
Develop and Deploy
● Technologies not yet competitive with high-carbon alternatives
● UK has relevant capabilities
● UK we...
Deploy
● UK appears to lack an advantage
● Unlikely to influence direction of development
● may develop some components
● ...
Research & Develop
●Technologies further from market
● Unclear which country has, or will have, an advantage
● Potential f...
27
● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets
● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery
● Building a Low Carbon Econ...
28
Residential sector emissions:
current approach
The main policy instrument is the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CER...
29
A major shift in ambition is needed
Insulation
measures
Total needed to
achieve carbon
budgets (from 2008)
Delivered
un...
30
CCC recommended approach
Three pillar approach:
• Whole house approach: one stop shop covering all cost effective
measu...
Key areas for policy strengthening
Encouraging a move to more carbon-efficient cars, including electric carsEncouraging a ...
32
● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets
● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery
● Building a Low Carbon Econ...
33
A key role for Universities…
Evidence-based policyEvidence-based policy
AdvocacyAdvocacy
Targetted research and busines...
34
● Scale of change over next 40 years – a career
● Low carbon finance: carbon prices, carbon tax, investment in a carbon...
35
Universities are playing a key role…
Evidence-based policy: 7 out of 9 CCC members;
CSAs…
Evidence-based policy: 7 out ...
What do VCs want from Business
Schools?
37
● Brand and prestige
● Income: premium product range, high margins – a significant
contributor to University costs
● Li...
Friday, January 30, 2015 38
Bang Go the Quangos:
Responding to Concern, Cuts and
Competition
The continuing journey from b...
39
• To provide an overview of the development of
university based business education and research
over the last 65 years
...
Overview
1. Business education and research in the UK over the last 65 years
- Expansion
- Changing institutional types
- ...
Business education and research
in the UK over the last 65 years
From business club to academy.
Expansion
Business and Management Student Numbers (1994/95 to 2006/07)
-
20,000
40,000
60,000
80,000
100,000
120,000
140,0...
Changing Institutional Types
Henley Bradford Cranfield
London Business School
Ashridge
Lancaster University
Management Sch...
Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 44
Warwick Imperial Said Judge
Roffey Park Templeton College Univ...
Standardisation
• CNAA Crick Report (1964)
• RSE (86 & 89) RAE (92, 96, 01 & 08) and REF (2013 or 14
possibly)
• AMBA Accr...
Dignification
Business and Management
S No %
Russell Group 1992 13 502.3 (24.7)
2001 17 670.7 (26.3)
2008 19 1,179 (35.3)
...
Internationalisation
0
10000
20000
30000
40000
50000
60000
70000
80000
90000
China India Malaysia USA Hong Kong Pakistan N...
Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 48
Current financial position
Turnover - 20 selected HEIs (‘000s)...
Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 49
Current financial position
Surplus - 20 selected HEIs (2007-20...
Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 50
Current financial position
Debt as percent of turnover
- 20 se...
Business education and research
in the UK over the next 5 years
Concern, cuts and competition.
?
Concern
Public concern about what is taught in business schools.
Concern
Quangos and other public institutions that will lose funding and may go
Cuts
ANNUAL COST TOTAL COST ADDITIONAL LIFETIME
EARNINGS
GOING TO UNIVERSITY
Proposed fee £6,000 £18,000
Living expenses £6,000...
Cuts
Restrictions on tier 1 work permits and tier 4 student visas
Competition
Then there is growing competition from private sector,
for profit and not for profit institutions and FE colle...
Old model New model
Academics Teach 8 to 12 hours, Teach 18 to 22 hours
research 12 to 8 hours per week
per week.
Building...
Projected UK Population, aged 18-20,
2006-2020
Changing demography
The student population in the future is changing as well
Changing demography
Average age and highest qualification level in
the UK, like mainland Europe, is increasing.
Changing planet
And sustainability is the new triple bottom line
- people, planet and profit.
Changing technology
And as if that wasn’t enough, there is mobile learning,
research and working to contend with.
Friday, January 30, 2015 Presentation to Pakistanii Visitors Delegation 63Demonstrate contribution, cooperate or compete t...
• Demonstrate contribution – circa £8bn per annum
• Cooperate to save costs
- Focus on specific types of customer/student
...
• The UK is a major HE provider – the second most popular
location for overseas students.
• Business education began as co...
• Several institutions are already in a difficult financial
position as a consequence of chasing rankings.
• New competito...
OverviewOverview
operating in different dimensions
super will power, alchemy
hypnotism, time travel
super multitasking
‘st...
OverviewOverview
frustration, stress, uncertainty, autonomy, positioning, ‘money, morale
and movement’
income generation, ...
OverviewOverview
understand cost base, cut costs, deconstruct value chain, outsourcing,
opportunities for growth, scenario...
NeedsNeeds
lobby government and vice-chancellors more effectively
better access to the top table within universities
bench...
ABS 2010 Annual Conference
The Bologna Effect:
Developments in European
Higher Education
Dr Christian Yeomans
UK Higher Ed...
Session overview
• UK HE International and Europe Unit
• Setting the scene – higher education
on centre stage in Europe
• ...
UK HE Europe Unit
• Universities UK
• HE Funding Councils for England,
Scotland and Wales and DELNI
• GuildHE
• Quality As...
Anniversary conference,
March 2010
 Ministerial anniversary conference,
11-12 March 2010
 David Lammy MP, Prof Colin Rio...
Key Bologna Process reforms
• Bachelor – Master – Doctoral cycles
(UK already uses this structure)
• Overarching Framework...
Key Bologna Process reforms
• European Credit Transfer System (ECTS)
(Experience of using credit – NUCCATS, SCQF)
• Diplom...
Bologna Process 2009-2012:
Leuven Communiqué
 Student mobility: in 2020, 20% of students graduating
in the European Highe...
EU 2020 Strategy - 1
• Replaces the Lisbon Agenda
• Main aims - universities are central to:
• exiting Europe from the eco...
EU 2020 Strategy - 2
 Through the Strategy, the Commission
identifies three key drivers for growth:
1. smart growth - fos...
Research agenda in the EU
• Framework Programmes for Research and
Development (FP7: 2007-2013)
• UK sector policy position...
Europe Unit Survey - 2009
To assess UK HEIs engagement in European
initiatives
- Diploma Supplement;
- Use of ECTS;
- Mast...
Looking ahead in the UK –
priorities for the future
 Diploma Supplement
 European Credit Transfer and
Accumulation Syste...
European Higher Education Area
- Opportunities for UK HE sector
• Greater student mobility
- joint degrees, credit points,...
European Higher Education Area -
Challenges for UK HE sector
• Perception of UK qualifications in
the EHEA
- Need for visi...
Competition for international
students
Joint report with UK
HE International Unit
•France
•Germany
•Netherlands
•Poland
•S...
The UK HE Europe Unit
• For further information visit:
www.europeunit.ac.uk
• Or email:
christian.yeomans@europeunit.ac.uk...
ALWAYS LEARNING
How can technology be an engine of
growth in the future of business
education?
RICHARD STAGG
PUBLISHING DI...
“Five years from now on the web
for free you’ll be able to find
the best lectures in the world.
It will be better than any...
PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE :
THE PEARSON PERSPECTIVE
PEARSON PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE :
THE WORLD’S LEADING EDUCATION COMPANY
2.6
2.3
2.0
1.7
1.4
1.2
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.3...
PEARSON: SOME CLUES TO OUR FUTURE
Education | International | Technology
NEXT?
WHAT’S CHANGING
CUSTOMER DEMAND
BUSINESS EDUCATION
LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES
WHAT NEXT?
changing business customer expectations
“Learning is what
most people will
do for a living in
the 21st Century”...
WHAT NEXT?
changing business customer expectations
“Let go of the cult of
rational analysis.
Soft skills are
actually the
...
WHAT NEXT?
changing business schools
• The challenge of growth
changing funding and fees landscapes
new competitors and al...
WHAT NEXT?
changing business schools
“There are
challenges …
but technology is
the key
facilitator”
Gabriel Hawawani, INSE...
WHAT NEXT?
learning technologies are changing too
• MOBILE LEARNING
• SOCIAL NETWORKS:
SOCIAL LEARNING
• GAMING &VIRTUAL
W...
WHAT NOW?
“The anecdotal evidence is very
strong that, in the US, the
smartest students don’t go to
lectures. There are ju...
WHAT’S EFFECTIVE HERE?
IMPROVING BUSINESS EDUCATION
CONTENT
+ + +TECHNOLOGY SERVICESASSESSMENT
Online, all the time: perso...
THE MYLAB STORY
“We couldn’t keep track of student
progress by setting home-work,
as marking 800 pieces of work is
simply ...
MYLABS FOR THE LEARNER
Personalised study | Practice | Feedback
MYLABS FOR THE LEARNER
Engagement | Experience | Application
MYLABS FOR THE INSTRUCTOR
Teaching effectiveness | Assignment | Assessment
THE MYLAB STORY
IS IT WORKING?
“MyAccountingLab’s instant feedback holds the interest of a newer generation of
learners.As...
MYLABS FOR THE BUSINESS SCHOOL
AN ENGINE FOR GROWTH?
• Higher student performance : lower drop-out rates
• Improved studen...
THE MYLAB STORY
WHAT WE’RE LEARNING
. . . IT’S NOT ABOUT A PRODUCT
FOR THE EDUCATOR:
It’s all about behaviour.
What teachi...
AND SO,A
PEARSON STRATEGY
• Using technology to personalize learning
• Using testing to help as well as measure learning
•...
PEARSON’S FUTURE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION?
“The driver of change has been the
management of educational
process, with testing...
ALWAYS LEARNING
ANY QUESTIONS?
richard.stagg@pearson.com
RICHARD STAGG
PUBLISHING DIRECTOR
HIGHER & PROFESSIONAL
EDUCATION
Learning from our students…Learning from our students…
Clive Robertson
Steve Probert
AgendaAgenda
1. Surveys and League Tables: Indicators of quality?
2. NSS: what the results tell us
3. PTES: what the resul...
“Statistically risible exercise in neoliberal populism”
An outsourced non-academic exercise, the outcomes
of which reflect...
“Part of the reason that we have put some effort into different
forms of assessment and feedback (discussed at length in
c...
• “Our institution has made changes - especially to
encourage high completion rates of NSS (through
forms that look a bit ...
“Whether or not "reactions" are rational / economic or
in any sense to the real benefit of students' education
is a mute p...
What best predict a good-quality university education
are measures of “educational process” including:
class size, teachin...
• Data on university funding, research performance, reputation and
student entry grades – often used by newspaper league t...
• There is a potential gap between reputation and the quality of
the academic experience
• Many students will choose “repu...
Analysis of 2009 NSS dataAnalysis of 2009 NSS data
Business and Administrative
Studies
Mean results for the main categories
Mean overall satisfaction of UK students
Teaching experience of UK students
Assessment and Feedback Experience of UK students
Academic Support Experience of UK students
The main areas of concern for UK students:
Teaching,
Assessment and Feedback
Academic Support
Results of International Students
responses to Business Degrees
Categorisation of International Students
Breakdown of results by International students
Teaching
Breakdown of results by International students
Assessment and Feedback
Breakdown of results by International students
Academic Support
Breakdown of results by International students
Organisation and Management
Breakdown of results by International students
Learning Resources
Breakdown of results by International students
Personal Development
International Students:
Analysis by category
International Student Experience
Teaching
International Student Experience
Assessment and Feedback
International Student Experience
Academic Support
International Student Experience
Organisation and Management
International Student Experience
Learning Resources
International Student Experience
Personal Development
International Student Experience
Overall Satisfaction
Postgraduate Taught Experience SurveyPostgraduate Taught Experience Survey
2010 saw the second full administration of PTES...
The questions were structured in ten main sections:
Section A. Motivations
Section B. Quality of teaching and learning
Sec...
On the whole, taught postgraduate students were very positive about their
experiences:
For example, 85% [84%] agreed that ...
The top two motivational factors for taking a taught postgraduate
programme were considered to be to improve employment
pr...
Taught postgraduate students rated the quality of their
teaching and learning and staff very highly, being most
positive (...
Students’ views on teaching and learning, and staff 2009, 2010Students’ views on teaching and learning, and staff 2009, 20...
Students’ views on assessment and feedback, 2009, 2010Students’ views on assessment and feedback, 2009, 2010
• Assessment ...
The three most common disciplines of respondents
were business and administrative studies (23.3%),
education (11.3%) and s...
Profile of respondents, by discipline, 2008, 2009, 2010Profile of respondents, by discipline, 2008, 2009, 2010
Overall, th...
Just under two-thirds (63%, compared with 59% in
2009) of the students were self-funded, less than a fifth
(16%, compared ...
Just under half (49%, compared with 55% in 2009) were
in paid employment at the time of the survey.
Of those who were in p...
Summary of multiple regression analysisSummary of multiple regression analysis
Scales Beta Significant? Rank 2010 Rank 200...
Student Focus Group, Oxford, October 2010Student Focus Group, Oxford, October 2010
11 students from 6 universities
Undergr...
Graduates with ImpactGraduates with Impact
• Work experience
• Extra-curricular learning opportunities
• Working links wit...
We asked students what they thought the attributes ofWe asked students what they thought the attributes of
graduates shoul...
Employers say:Employers say:
*Personal communication skills; using numbers, words
and technology; team-working, customer c...
Better teachingBetter teaching
• Less group work, unless explicitly to develop team-working skills
• Manage disruptive inf...
Flexible learningFlexible learning
• Social networking sites, texting, mobile phone apps, UTube –
not just VLE
• On-line l...
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  • Setting first three budgets
    Need for a step change
    2009 benefits mainly as a result of recession – step change still needed. Progress on policy development, but measures not enough
  • UK RD&D funding is low by international standards and benchmarks – and global funding needs to increase.
    In the recently published Energy Technology Perspectives 2010, the IEA estimate that global public-sector low-carbon energy technology RD&D spending will need to increase by between two and five times. The Stern Review recommended that energy RD&D would need to at least double.
    Although these are focused on energy RD&D spend, the lessons have traction across the broader low-carbon space.
    Specifically, funding for key technologies is at or below the level required to prepare for meeting carbon budgets through the 2020s
    Cuts in total public expenditure for low-carbon RDD&D below 2009/10 levels would be detrimental to the achievement of our climate goals.
    By not investing more in low-carbon RD&D, the UK is arguably failing to exploit the opportunities offered by a low-carbon economy.
  • It is neither necessary nor affordable for the UK to seek to lead on every mitigation technology. There are technologies where the UK is better placed to support technology development, and others where a focus on international collaboration and deployment is more appropriate.
    Develop and deploy - The UK will be better placed to accelerate the development of new technologies where it has a particular advantage – for example where the UK has the full range of manufacturing and business R&D facilities. In these technologies, UK based companies will
    lead international collaborations and the technology will be significantly developed, demonstrated and deployed in the UK. In this case the Government should adopt a ‘develop and deploy’ strategy and offer the full range of RDD&D support, where appropriate.
  • Where the UK appears to lack an advantage in production its influence on the development of technologies is likely to be much less.
    UK based suppliers may develop important components and may participate in international collaborations, but the pace and scale of development will be predominantly determined overseas.
    A ‘Deploy’ strategy refers to the targeting of public support at demonstrating and, if necessary, adapting technologies to local conditions & building the skills required for operation and maintenance.
  • Finally the third group (Research and Develop) refers to technologies that may currently be further from market and where it is unclear which country has, or will have, a particular advantage.
    Committee is clear that public support should not direct academic research given the primary purpose of generating knowledge and ideas. But government should ensure that the results of research and development programmes are disseminated widely.
    A ‘Research & Develop’ strategy is therefore recommended where the UK:
    Has a significant research capability; and
    The potential to develop a leadership role.
  • The London Business School is ranked No1 in the Financial Times global business school ranking largely as a consequence of the increase in students earnings that it is able to achieve. Other UK schools in the top 100 include Oxford (Said) (16), Cambridge (Judge) (21), Lancaster University Management School (24), Cranfield Management School (26), Imperial College Business School (32), Manchester Business School (40), City University (Cass) (41), University of Warwick Business School (42), University of Strathclyde Business School (51), Aston Business School (73), Durham Business School (74), Birmingham Business School (75), University of Bath School of Management (87), University of Edinburgh Business School (89), Bradford School of Management (89), Hult International Business School (94).
    Among the other European Schools, Insead is ranked 5th (including its base in Singapore), Instituta di Empressa in Madrid is ranked 6th, and IESE in Barcelona (11). IMD in Switzerland (15), HEC Paris (18), Esade Business School, Spain (19), Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University (25), SDA Bocconi (38), Verick Leuven (87) and EM Lyon (97).
    There are 62 business schools in the list with bases in the USA, ranging from Wharton (2), Harvard (3), Stanford (4), Columbia (6), Sloan MIT (8) and Chicago (9) in the top 10. To Case Western Reserve (80), University of Miami School of Business Administration (83) University of Arizona Eller (83), Brigham Young University (83), Arizona State University Carey (89), SMU Cox (96) and Babson (99). There are a further 6 from Canada. University of Toronto, Rotman (45), University of Western Ontario (49), York University (54), University of British Columbia (82), University of Alberta (86) and
    There are three from China, Hong Kong UST Business School (9), CEIBS Shanghai (22), Chinese University of Hong Kong (28). Three from Australia, Australian School of Business (36), Melbourne Business School (63) and Macquarie Graduate School of Management (99). Two from Singapore Insead (5th) and Nanyang Business School (27).
    There was only one business school from Africa, Cape Town GSB (89).
  • Corporate concern
    Marcus Agius Barclays Chairman (Harvard MBA)
    George Bush, President of USA, (MBA, Harvard)
    Charles Christopher Cox, Chairman of SEC (MBA, Harvard)
    Ray Dalio, Bridgewaters Hedge Fund (MBA, Harvard)
    Eric Daniels, CEO Lloyds TSB (MSc Management, MIT)
    Evan Mervyn Davies, Chairman Standard Chartered (Management Development Programme Harvard)
    Robert Diamond CEO Barclays Capital (MBA, Connecticut)
    Jamie L Dimon, CEO JP Morgan Chase (MBA, Harvard)
    Brady Dougan, CEO Credit Suisse (MBA, Chicago)
    Rona Fairhead, CEO Financial Times (MBA, Harvard)
    Richard Fuld, CEO Lehman Brothers (MBA, Stern Business School)
    Fred Goodwin, RBS (LLB, Glasgow University)
    Stephen Green, CEO HSBC (MSc Management, MIT)
    Robert P Kelly (Bank of New York Mellon) MBA Cass Business School
    Ken Lewis, Bank of America (Executive Program, Stanford University).
    John Mack, CEO Morgan Stanley, (BA, Duke University)
    Andy Hornby, CEO HBOS (MBA, Harvard)
    Stan O’Neal CEO Merrill Lynch (MBA, Harvard)
    Hank Paulson Secretary of the Treasury, former CEO Goldman Sachs (MBA, Harvard)
    Baudouin Prot is the CEO of BNP Paribas (MBA HEC)
    Peter Sands Standard Chartered, (MPA, Harvard University)
    Bruce Wasserstein, Chairman and CEO Lazard (MBA, Harvard)
    Academic concern
    Henry Mintzberg (2003). Managers not MBAs, McGraw Hill, London.
    Jeffrey Pfeffer and Christina Fong (2002). The end of business schools: less success than meets the eye, Academy of Management Learning and Education, Vol. 1, No. 1.
    Warren Bennis and James O’Toole (2005). How business schools lost their way, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 83, No. 5, p96, p9.
    Sumatra Ghoshal (2005). Bad management theories are destroying good management practices, Academy of Management Learning and Education, Vol. 4, No. 1, pp75-101.
    Rakesh Khurana (2007). From Higher Aims to Hired Hands, Princeton University Press, New Jersey.
  •    
  • Last slide featured a book about MBAs, this slide features a mobile product called the Mobile MBA – combination here of ebook and a deck of 100 “skill pills” – each a 2 minute pice of bite-sized bleanded learning delivered to a mobile device, where and when you need it. Strap-line = sat nav for business. Not as scary as it sounds, but it reflects how technology has changed the things that our customers ask for and the things we offer them.
    Malcolm Gladwell (pearson author) said recently “Look, technology is going to solve the energy problem, I’m convinced of it. But technology does not and cannot change the underlying dynamics of “human” problems: it does not make it easier to love or to motivate or to dream or to convince.” Well what about education. Does it make it easier tp learn? And if it does, what does that mean for us?
    Technology is undoubtedly the single largest dynamic in the future of business education, and indeed in education generally. It’s affecting why people learn and what people learn. It’s affecting who can learn and what they want to learn, and of course it’s affecting how people learn and where and when people learn.
    Will the next generation of business learners want to be in a room with a great teacher and a set of classmates who each bring their own experience and perspective to the experience? Or will they just want to download everything to their trainers?
    If we largely think of education as the accumulation of information, then why wouldn’t the internet be sufficient in providing what most people would need? Would Bill Gates be right?
    If you read the pages of Fast Company or Business Week, or listen to (the wikirati) Don Tapscott or Clay Shirkey, you could be forgiven for being entirely paranoid about this.
    Theme today: technology and open learning content (free to use – as in beer – and free to use – as in do what you want with it - ) could be a huge disruption to business ed, and business schools in particular
    Economist (anopther Pearson lug, sorry) posed a question recently “Could America’s universities go the same way as it’s car companies?”
    Trapped between rising costs (1993-2007 harvard increased its admin spend per student by 300%) and cheaper alternatives for learners
    But, could also be an engine of growth, something that allows institutions to deliver a better experience, a more valuable and distinctive product, to more students, more efficiently. And to do so throughout their lives
    What I’m going to attempt to do today is share some of our perspective at Pearson Education, and we’re taking the optimistic view that technology can be a force for good in learning, and an engine of growth for business education in particular,
    if we apply it with confidence, then it could make business education more dynamic, more personalised, more effective and more profitable.
    Here’s where share our some of our strategy, and show you how works in action with two applications for business schools: MYLABS and CUSTOM LIBRARIES
  • PEARSON
    Pearson is the world's leading education company. We provide learning materials, technologies, assessments and services to teachers and students of all ages and in more than 60 countries.
    – from classroom to boardroom
    Pearson is the world's leading education company. We provide learning materials, technologies, assessments and services to teachers and students of all ages and in more than 60 countries.
    The judgement we made a few years ago was that in a world where the prosperity of individuals and countries increasingly depends on their knowledge and skills, our products matter more than ever. We like to think that we help people live and learn, to get on with their careers, and make the most of their lives.
    We believe 'knowledge' markets are good markets to be in when the world is moving from relying mostly on muscle power to relying mostly on brain power. Those markets require news and information to run businesses or countries; education - cradle to grave, pre-school to professional
  • 65 percent of its revenue from education businesses,
    80% of Pearson’s profits now come from institutional education; that deals with students through colleges & schoolsso your challenges are our challenges
    (This list of competitors includes those doing education across the board – not just those making materials.
    More and more, we think that’s the relevant comparison for the kind of business we are now in education.)
    We’re investing in education when many of our competitors have exited:
    07: However, last week Anglo-Dutch publisher Reed Elsevier (REL.L) revealed it wanted to sell its education arm to focus on faster-growing markets such as legal, medical and scientific electronic publishing.
    Dutch group Wolters Kluwer (WLSNc.AS) and Canadian publisher Thomson Corp. TOC.TO are also selling their education assets.
    So we now cover the waterfront of learning content, technology, assessment, qualifications and services
    There are three other Pearson-wide financial indicators that I think were especially important last year and are going to be even more crucial in the future:
    Digital products and services generated £1.7bn in revenues.  That’s double our total of five years ago and now almost one-third of our entire sales across Pearson. Those sales came from all over Pearson, and our learning technologies were at the heart of many of them.
    In emerging economies – India, China, Africa, Latin America, the Middle East – our sales reached $650m.  That’s also double the total of five years ago and demonstrates our march toward being a truly international company.
    Product investment – our pipeline of new content and digital services – reached an all-time high of $800m last year. That means that we didn’t rein back our investment for the future to make money in the short-term.
  • Focus on education
    International orientation
    China/ latin America / Asia/ MEAC
    Leading with technology
    VOCATIONAL – Melorio / BTEC etc
    Our approach to that next chapter is based on a simple truth: we’re all always learning. But the experience of learning is different for every person, at every stage of their lives.
    That’s why we’ve been working on “personalizing learning”
  • Through our activities – from Barclays cap, KPMG survey to student advisory boards
    Research on demand: soft skils; leadership, coaching & performance management, communication, innovation & collaboration
  • Through our activities – from Barclays cap, KPMG survey to student advisory boards
    Research on demand: soft skils; leadership, coaching & performance management, communication, innovation & collaboration
    Shorter – instant gratification / sat nav for business
    “My people are bright but busy. They are visual learners and they want a lesson every 5 minutes. Won’t sit still for 350 pages.”
    CTO Barclays Capital, Safari Customer
  • Through our activities – from Barclays cap, KPMG survey to student advisory boards
  • Mobile: iPhone Anytime, Anywhere Learning (USA)
    • Who? higher-education students
    • What? Maths practice on-the-go
    • Why? focuses on test anxiety
    • How? personal video tutoring
    practice tests + gaming ‘high scores’
    But – STUDENTS AS CONSUMERS ARE DIFFERENT TO STUDENTS AS LEARNERS
  • If we continue to think of education as the accumulation of information, then why wouldn’t the internet be sufficient in providing what most people would need?
  • where tomorrow’s learning meets today’s education
  • Manage more students, more effectively
    Reduced (or eliminated) time spent grading assignments
    Quick and easy modification to course content
    Real-time viewing and analysis of student performance
    Less time teaching rudimentary content; more time with deeper content and classroom experience
  • DEVELOPING FULL SUITEMyStrategyLab
    MyEconLab
    MyAccountingLab
    MyFinanceLab
    MyMarketingLab
    MyManagememntLab (incl. OB, HR)
    MyWritingLab
    MyMathLab
    MySkillsLab
    DEVELOPING SERVICE & SUPPORT
    MYLAB PLUS – wider offering with service & reporting
    Tech Team / 24/7 / Faculty advocates
  • Across Europe there is a consensus that we now live in a knowledge driven economy where a better education will help you progress throughout your life.
    The recession has meant that Governments and individuals are looking for better value from the money they spend on education.
    Technology, which has enhanced many parts of our lives, also offers the opportunity to transform education by making its delivery more personalised and effective.
    One of the biggest areas of growth is the rise of English teaching as it becomes the first real global language of business, culture, higher education (via the Bologna accord) and the internet.
    Using technology to personalise learningMYLABS use artificial intelligence to personalise the teaching and learning process, to stretch and engage, to allow practice, problem-solving, simulation as required
    use assessment to help as well as measure learningformative etc
    Helping teachers become more effectivePlay a more active support role for instructors and managers; through content, technology and advice – helping schools use our content and our tools to improve outcomes
    As more HEI’s across the UK and Europe look for new revenue streams; either from Distance Learning or International initiatives; (especially in India, China and Middle-East), HN top-ups, and UK London Campuses etc, we will see more demand for VLE solutions with pre-loaded content and single sign-on solutions.
    use our content, brands and reach to help educators compete and grow
  • Pearson announced the formation of a SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT BUSINESS in July – run by ANDERS HULTIN, who co-founded the leading chain of independent schools in Sweden
  • AGM 2010 presentations

    1. 1. Addressing climate change A role for Universities (and Business Schools) www.theccc.org.uk Professor Julia King CBE FREng Committee on Climate Change Vice-Chancellor, Aston University Birmingham Association of Business Schools 18th October 2010
    2. 2. The CCC was established December 1st 2008 2 The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) is an independent body established under the Climate Change Act to advise the UK Government on setting carbon budgets, and to report to Parliament on the progress made in reducing greenhouse gas emissions The Committee on Climate Change (CCC) is an independent body established under the Climate Change Act to advise the UK Government on setting carbon budgets, and to report to Parliament on the progress made in reducing greenhouse gas emissions Lord Turner Sam Fankhauser Michael Grubb Sir Brian Hoskins Julia King David Kennedy Lord Krebs Lord May Jim Skea
    3. 3. 3 The work of the CCC
    4. 4. 4 ● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets ● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery ● Building a Low Carbon Economy: the innovation challenge ● Evidence-based policy ● A key role for Universities
    5. 5. 5 Required global emissions reduction Required global emissions reduction of 50% • 20-24Gt CO2e in 2050 • 8-10Gt CO2e in 2100 Required global emissions reduction of 50% • 20-24Gt CO2e in 2050 • 8-10Gt CO2e in 2100 Why the urgency? • Advances in science • Actual emissions higher than forecast Why the urgency? • Advances in science • Actual emissions higher than forecast Assessment of damage Decision rule • keep temperature change close to 2°C • and probability of 4°C increase at very low level: less than 1% Assessment of damage Decision rule • keep temperature change close to 2°C • and probability of 4°C increase at very low level: less than 1% Global trajectories considered • Early or later peak (2015 vs. 2030) • 3%/4% annual emissions reduction Global trajectories considered • Early or later peak (2015 vs. 2030) • 3%/4% annual emissions reduction
    6. 6. 6 Appropriate UK contribution 50% global reduction50% global reduction Burden share • Alternative methodologies: contract and converge, intensity convergence, triptych etc • Equal per capita emissions: ̶ 20-24Gt CO2e total at global level in 2050 ̶ implies 2.1-2.6t CO2e per capita Burden share • Alternative methodologies: contract and converge, intensity convergence, triptych etc • Equal per capita emissions: ̶ 20-24Gt CO2e total at global level in 2050 ̶ implies 2.1-2.6t CO2e per capita All GHGsAll GHGs Aviation and shipping included Aviation and shipping included 2.1-2.6t CO2e per capita gives a UK reduction of at least 80% in 2050
    7. 7. 7 2.1 – 2.4 tonnes of CO2 per annum ● A return flight to Los Angeles for one person currently accounts for 2.5 tonnes ● An average new car today in the UK (160g/km), driven 15,000km per year, emits 2.4 tonnes per annum
    8. 8. 8 178 135 97 109 94 42 2007 emissions International aviation & international shipping* UK non-CO2 GHGs Other CO2 Industrial CO2 (heat & industrial processes) Residential, public & commercial heat Domestic transport Electricity generation * bunker fuels basis 2050 objective 159 Mt CO2e 679 Mt CO2e 76% cut (= 80% vs. 1990) The UK challenge: 80% reduction by 2050
    9. 9. 9 The Carbon Budgets: ‘Interim’ legislated in May 2009, move to ‘Intended’ budget to be reviewed in 2010 Interim: 34% cut in GHGs by 2020, relative to 1990 [20% on 2007 levels] Global deal Intended: 42% cut in GHGs by 2020 relative to 1990 – to be reviewed following Copenhagen [29% on 2007 levels] Intended: 42% cut in GHGs by 2020 relative to 1990 – to be reviewed following Copenhagen [29% on 2007 levels] 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 2003-2007 2008-12 2013-17 2018-22 MtCO2e Interim budget Intendedbudget
    10. 10. 10 400 450 500 550 600 650 700 750 800 850 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 MtCO2e UK GHG emissions 1990-2007 Other GHGs CO2 In 2007, GHG emissions were 18% lower than in1990 Non-CO2 GHGs 49% below 1990 levels Non-CO2 GHGs 49% below 1990 levels CO2 8% below 1990 levels CO2 8% below 1990 levels CO2 Total GHGs 18% lowerTotal GHGs 18% lower
    11. 11. 11 2009 CCC Report: meeting budgets requires a step change relative to recent progress CO2 emissions fell 0.5% annually 2003-07 CO2 emissions fell 0.5% annually 2003-07 Cuts of 2-3% p.a. are required through first three budgets Cuts of 2-3% p.a. are required through first three budgets A major shift in the pace of reduction is therefore required across all sectors A major shift in the pace of reduction is therefore required across all sectors 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 MtCO2 Total CO2 emissions Historic Extrapolation Required path
    12. 12. 12 Route to the required reductions Reducing power sector emissions: Renewables (wind, marine, biomass, solar), nuclear, CCS Reducing power sector emissions: Renewables (wind, marine, biomass, solar), nuclear, CCS Reducing heat emissions: • Electric heat (e.g. heat pumps, storage heating) Reducing heat emissions: • Electric heat (e.g. heat pumps, storage heating) Reducing transport emissions: • Electric/plug-in hybrids Reducing transport emissions: • Electric/plug-in hybrids Application of power to transport and heat
    13. 13. 13 ● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets ● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery ● Building a Low Carbon Economy: the innovation challenge ● Evidence-based policy ● A key role for Universities
    14. 14. Emissions fell 8.6% in 2009 CO2 9.7% Non-CO2 1.9% CO2 Non-CO2GHG
    15. 15. CO2 emissions fell in all sectors, particularly power and industry (% change in 2009)
    16. 16. 16 2009 CCC Report: meeting budgets requires a step change relative to recent progress CO2 emissions fell 0.5% annually 2003-07 CO2 emissions fell 0.5% annually 2003-07 Cuts of 2-3% p.a. are required through first three budgets Cuts of 2-3% p.a. are required through first three budgets A major shift in the pace of reduction is therefore required across all sectors A major shift in the pace of reduction is therefore required across all sectors 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 MtCO2 Total CO2 emissions Historic Extrapolation Required path
    17. 17. 2010: possible to meet the Intended budget through domestic effort alone If impact of recession persists and measures in Committee’s Extended Ambition scenario are implemented, emissions will be below Intended budget If impact of recession persists and measures in Committee’s Extended Ambition scenario are implemented, emissions will be below Intended budget We will consider possible move to Intended budget in context of advice on 4th carbon budget (2023-2027) We will consider possible move to Intended budget in context of advice on 4th carbon budget (2023-2027)
    18. 18. 18 178 135 97 109 94 42 2007 emissions International aviation & international shipping* UK non-CO2 GHGs Other CO2 Industrial CO2 (heat & industrial processes) Residential, public & commercial heat Domestic transport Electricity generation * bunker fuels basis 2050 objective 159 Mt CO2e 679 Mt CO2e 76% cut (= 80% vs. 1990) The UK challenge: 80% reduction by 2050 Power Transport Heat and efficiency Agriculture
    19. 19. 19 Power is central to wider economy decarbonisation 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 2045 2050 Totalelectricitygeneration(TWh) Carbon-intensityofelectricity (gCO2/kWh) Carbon-intensity Total generation Therefore we need to decarbonise electricity generation significantly by 2030 Therefore we need to decarbonise electricity generation significantly by 2030 The electrification of other sectors will see demand increase in 2020s and 2030s The electrification of other sectors will see demand increase in 2020s and 2030s
    20. 20. 20 By 2020 we need to deliver significant investment in low-carbon generation CCC indicative scenario by 2020 23 GW new wind Up to 4 new coal and gas CCS demonstrators Up to 2 new nuclear plants, a third by 2022 CCC indicative scenario by 2020 23 GW new wind Up to 4 new coal and gas CCS demonstrators Up to 2 new nuclear plants, a third by 2022 - 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 2008 2020 GW Capacity - todayand 2020 Oil Gas Coal Coal CCS Renewables Nuclear
    21. 21. 21 ● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets ● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery ● Building a Low Carbon Economy: the innovation challenge ● Evidence-based policy ● A key role for Universities
    22. 22. 22 UK Energy RD&D Source: IEA UK is failing to exploit the opportunities offered by a low-carbon economy
    23. 23. 23 ● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets ● Progress in reducing emissions ● Key areas for new policies ● Power, Energy use in buildings, Transport ● Future work of the Committee ● The impact of UK Universities Sectoral CO2 emissions scenario for 80% reduction Markal modelling based on CCC assumptions
    24. 24. Develop and Deploy ● Technologies not yet competitive with high-carbon alternatives ● UK has relevant capabilities ● UK well placed to accelerate development
    25. 25. Deploy ● UK appears to lack an advantage ● Unlikely to influence direction of development ● may develop some components ● can participate in international collaborations
    26. 26. Research & Develop ●Technologies further from market ● Unclear which country has, or will have, an advantage ● Potential for UK to lead/continue to lead some research areas
    27. 27. 27 ● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets ● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery ● Building a Low Carbon Economy: the innovation challenge ● Evidence-based policy ● A key role for Universities
    28. 28. 28 Residential sector emissions: current approach The main policy instrument is the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) which puts an obligation of energy suppliers to deliver carbon savings The main policy instrument is the Carbon Emissions Reduction Target (CERT) which puts an obligation of energy suppliers to deliver carbon savings In 2008 CERT delivered: • 153 million compact fluorescent lightbulbs (6 per household) • 690,000 loft insulation measures • 550,000 cavity wall insulation measures • 8,600 solid wall insulation measures In 2008 CERT delivered: • 153 million compact fluorescent lightbulbs (6 per household) • 690,000 loft insulation measures • 550,000 cavity wall insulation measures • 8,600 solid wall insulation measures
    29. 29. 29 A major shift in ambition is needed Insulation measures Total needed to achieve carbon budgets (from 2008) Delivered under CERT in 08/09 Installations needed per year to achieve carbon budgets Lofts 10 million (by 2015) 0.7 million 1.3 million Cavity walls 7.5 million (by 2015) 0.5 million 1 million Solid walls 2.3 million (by 2022) 8600 165,000
    30. 30. 30 CCC recommended approach Three pillar approach: • Whole house approach: one stop shop covering all cost effective measures • Neighbourhood approach: national government leadership, (e.g. strategy, legislation); area-based delivery with key role for local government and energy companies. Need to regulate private rented sector • Financing: pay as you save with some grants/subsidies to encourage uptake amongst fuel poor and more generally Three pillar approach: • Whole house approach: one stop shop covering all cost effective measures • Neighbourhood approach: national government leadership, (e.g. strategy, legislation); area-based delivery with key role for local government and energy companies. Need to regulate private rented sector • Financing: pay as you save with some grants/subsidies to encourage uptake amongst fuel poor and more generally
    31. 31. Key areas for policy strengthening Encouraging a move to more carbon-efficient cars, including electric carsEncouraging a move to more carbon-efficient cars, including electric cars Delivery mechanisms and incentives to improve energy efficiency of buildingsDelivery mechanisms and incentives to improve energy efficiency of buildings New policies for the agriculture sectorNew policies for the agriculture sector Incentives for investment in low carbon powerIncentives for investment in low carbon power Electricity market reform Carbon price floor Emissions Performance Standard Electricity market reform Carbon price floor Emissions Performance Standard Simpler and more focussed research and innovation policy and fundingSimpler and more focussed research and innovation policy and funding
    32. 32. 32 ● Introduction: 2050 target and carbon budgets ● June 2010: Ensuring a Low Carbon Recovery ● Building a Low Carbon Economy: the innovation challenge ● Evidence-based policy ● A key role for Universities
    33. 33. 33 A key role for Universities… Evidence-based policyEvidence-based policy AdvocacyAdvocacy Targetted research and business supportTargetted research and business support Graduates to deliver the low carbon economyGraduates to deliver the low carbon economy Best practice in buildings and estatesBest practice in buildings and estates Green innovation and entrepreneurshipGreen innovation and entrepreneurship
    34. 34. 34 ● Scale of change over next 40 years – a career ● Low carbon finance: carbon prices, carbon tax, investment in a carbon and resource constrained world, border taxes ● Travel, communications… ● The value of water – if water cost $1 a litre: the $180 coffee, $1000 T-shirt? ● New green industries, low carbon product strategy: electric cars, eco-buildings… ● Design for re-use ● Just in time? Low carbon logistics… ● New international partnerships, new supply chains ● New security threats ● New strategic resources and technologies…energy storage, Li, … Graduates for a resource constrained world
    35. 35. 35 Universities are playing a key role… Evidence-based policy: 7 out of 9 CCC members; CSAs… Evidence-based policy: 7 out of 9 CCC members; CSAs… Advocacy: Low Carbon Business Ambassador…Advocacy: Low Carbon Business Ambassador… Targetted research and business support: CCS, biofuels, energy storage, behaviour change, Targetted research and business support: CCS, biofuels, energy storage, behaviour change, Graduates to deliver the low carbon economy: sustainability; nuclear engineers; energy efficient construction, green finance, low carbon leadership… Graduates to deliver the low carbon economy: sustainability; nuclear engineers; energy efficient construction, green finance, low carbon leadership… Best practice in buildings and estates: 10 in 10; Salix fund; CHP developments, CRC... Best practice in buildings and estates: 10 in 10; Salix fund; CHP developments, CRC... Green innovation and entrepreneurship: support to SMEs, spinouts: Ceres Power, Solaveil… Green innovation and entrepreneurship: support to SMEs, spinouts: Ceres Power, Solaveil…
    36. 36. What do VCs want from Business Schools?
    37. 37. 37 ● Brand and prestige ● Income: premium product range, high margins – a significant contributor to University costs ● Links with business and international collaborations ● Interdisciplinary enhancements: management and health, management in engineering… ● Preparing graduates for management and leadership in a low carbon/resource constrained world ● Innovation and entrepreneurship ● Strong input to university management and leadership ● Leadership on the low carbon agenda: sustainability, corporate social responsibility, implications of low carbon finance What do VCs want from Business Schools?
    38. 38. Friday, January 30, 2015 38 Bang Go the Quangos: Responding to Concern, Cuts and Competition The continuing journey from business club via academy to responsive higher education and skills development ?
    39. 39. 39 • To provide an overview of the development of university based business education and research over the last 65 years • To outline some of the pressures facing universities and business schools in Great Britain • To consider some of the possible responses to these pressures and challenges Aims
    40. 40. Overview 1. Business education and research in the UK over the last 65 years - Expansion - Changing institutional types - Standardisation - Dignification - Internationalisation 2. Current financial position 3. Pressures facing British business schools – Concern – Cuts – Competition – Changing demography – Changing technology 4. Summary
    41. 41. Business education and research in the UK over the last 65 years From business club to academy.
    42. 42. Expansion Business and Management Student Numbers (1994/95 to 2006/07) - 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 1994/95 1995/96 1996/97 1997/98 1998/99 1999/00 2000/01 2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 Year Number Foundation Undergraduate Postgraduate Doctoral 1 in 7 undergraduates, 1 in 5 postgraduate taught and 1 in 20 Doctoral students are in Business and Management.
    43. 43. Changing Institutional Types Henley Bradford Cranfield London Business School Ashridge Lancaster University Management School Strathclyde Graduate School of Business Manchester Polytechnic Nottingham Polytechnic Sheffield Polytechnic Manchester Business School Middlesex Polytechnic 1950s 1960 to 70s 1970s to 80s
    44. 44. Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 44 Warwick Imperial Said Judge Roffey Park Templeton College University of Buckingham 1980s to 1990s 1990s to 2000+ Changing Institutional Types
    45. 45. Standardisation • CNAA Crick Report (1964) • RSE (86 & 89) RAE (92, 96, 01 & 08) and REF (2013 or 14 possibly) • AMBA Accreditation (1980s) • AACSB Mission related assessment standards (1991) • Times, Financial Times, Telegraph and Guardian league tables (1990s) • ESRC Recognised Training Status (1993) • Teaching Quality Assessment (1994) • EFMD EQUIS Accreditation (1998) • QAA Subject Benchmark Statements (2000 and 2007) • EFMD EPAS Accreditation (2006) Business education and research has been standardised and made more auditable over the last forty five years.
    46. 46. Dignification Business and Management S No % Russell Group 1992 13 502.3 (24.7) 2001 17 670.7 (26.3) 2008 19 1,179 (35.3) Other Pre-92 1992 25 832.9 (40.9) 2001 33 1,112.3 (43.5) 2008 33 1,448 (43.4) New Universities 1992 43 701.2 (34.4) 2001 41 771.6 (30.2) 2008 38 711.0 (21.3) The volume and concentration of business and management studies research in Russell Group institutions has increased over the last 16 years.
    47. 47. Internationalisation 0 10000 20000 30000 40000 50000 60000 70000 80000 90000 China India Malaysia USA Hong Kong Pakistan Nigeria Taiw an Japan Thailand 2005 2010 2015 International students by country of origin (actual 2005 and as forecast for 2015 in 2008). Business and management headcount 60,000 non-EU undergraduates 40,000 non-EU postgraduates
    48. 48. Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 48 Current financial position Turnover - 20 selected HEIs (‘000s) (2007-2009)
    49. 49. Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 49 Current financial position Surplus - 20 selected HEIs (2007-2009)
    50. 50. Friday, January 30, 2015 Principal Lecturer Presentation 50 Current financial position Debt as percent of turnover - 20 selected HEIs (2007-2009)
    51. 51. Business education and research in the UK over the next 5 years Concern, cuts and competition. ?
    52. 52. Concern Public concern about what is taught in business schools.
    53. 53. Concern Quangos and other public institutions that will lose funding and may go
    54. 54. Cuts
    55. 55. ANNUAL COST TOTAL COST ADDITIONAL LIFETIME EARNINGS GOING TO UNIVERSITY Proposed fee £6,000 £18,000 Living expenses £6,000 £18,000 Earnings forgone £10,000 £30,000 Totals £22,000 £66,000 £120,000 COMPARATORS School pupil £6,250 £18,750 £0 Benefit payments £6,250 £18,750 £0 Job on minimum wage £10,000 £10,000 £0 Prison place £40,000 £120,000 -£50,000 State University in France €400 €1,600 ? Grande Ecole in France €5,000-10,000 €15,000-€30,000 ? State University in Germany €1,000 €3,000 ? University in Spain €300-1,000 €900-3,000 ? Cuts UK to become one of the highest priced sites for HE in the world
    56. 56. Cuts Restrictions on tier 1 work permits and tier 4 student visas
    57. 57. Competition Then there is growing competition from private sector, for profit and not for profit institutions and FE colleges Rayat
    58. 58. Old model New model Academics Teach 8 to 12 hours, Teach 18 to 22 hours research 12 to 8 hours per week per week. Buildings Bought and built to house Endowed, leased or activity in iconic space rented. Focus on ROCE E-learning Variable and blended Comprehensive and supports asynchronous study Location Campus based City centric, good transport connections and links Overheads High 50% to 60% Low 20% to 30% Pension Underfunded final Employee funded salary scheme defined contribution scheme Price £7-10,000 per student £6,000 per student Reputation Broad base REF related Narrow core FT and Times related Support 3 x 8 and 2 x 4 for 200 days 7 x 12 for 360 days Competition The new business models are challenging for established providers
    59. 59. Projected UK Population, aged 18-20, 2006-2020 Changing demography The student population in the future is changing as well
    60. 60. Changing demography Average age and highest qualification level in the UK, like mainland Europe, is increasing.
    61. 61. Changing planet And sustainability is the new triple bottom line - people, planet and profit.
    62. 62. Changing technology And as if that wasn’t enough, there is mobile learning, research and working to contend with.
    63. 63. Friday, January 30, 2015 Presentation to Pakistanii Visitors Delegation 63Demonstrate contribution, cooperate or compete to improve cost effectiveness and change the curriculum So what is to be done?
    64. 64. • Demonstrate contribution – circa £8bn per annum • Cooperate to save costs - Focus on specific types of customer/student - Benchmark activities - Adopt leaner forms of working - Consider shared services for estate, finance, human resources, information technology, library and marketing. - Rationalise and merge research and teaching activities in regional and national confederations. • Change the curriculum and research agenda to address - Economic, social and environmental contribution - Changing demography - Changing technology - Competition from lower cost providers So what is to be done?
    65. 65. • The UK is a major HE provider – the second most popular location for overseas students. • Business education began as country club affair in the post WWII period. • Since 1960s there has been growth in a model of business education based on academic US business schools and mass teaching institutions. • The US model in the UK is increasingly challenged by – Concern about contribution – Cuts in public spending – Restrictions on immigration – Competition from overseas and lower cost private providers – Changing demography – Changing planet – Changing technology Summary
    66. 66. • Several institutions are already in a difficult financial position as a consequence of chasing rankings. • New competitors have different business models which operate at lower levels of unit cost. • The demise of several quangos will reduce regulated standardisation. • Success will be achieved by those who identify and focus effectively on specific student customer groups and offer them something of high value at a sustainable price and cost. Summary
    67. 67. OverviewOverview operating in different dimensions super will power, alchemy hypnotism, time travel super multitasking ‘stab proof’ skin, able to see the future, through walls invisibility, invincibility diplomatic passport, legal immunity Powers Deans Would LikePowers Deans Would Like
    68. 68. OverviewOverview frustration, stress, uncertainty, autonomy, positioning, ‘money, morale and movement’ income generation, quality, accreditations worthwhile? faculty recruitment, employee relations, staff resistance to e-learning financial targets, models, T v. R, transnational education pricing, student recruitment, visa rules, consumerism, changing student profile, learning experience, value proposition ‘get real’ for 2012 communicating and engaging with staff to influence changes ChallengesChallenges
    69. 69. OverviewOverview understand cost base, cut costs, deconstruct value chain, outsourcing, opportunities for growth, scenario planning, lobbying. radically review curriculum, innovating modes of delivery, work based learning courses, new teaching technologies, ‘universities without staff or buildings.’ teaching only contracts, voluntary severance notices, renegotiating legal and psychological contracts. valuing teaching more, reviewing workload models, redefining academic careers and incentives. greater collaboration across the faculty and the university, with overseas partners, social networking with alumni greater engagement with stakeholders, making the school more distinctive with accreditations, professional recognition and rankings, ensuring greater preparedness to change and differentiate the value proposition. Implementation NowImplementation Now
    70. 70. NeedsNeeds lobby government and vice-chancellors more effectively better access to the top table within universities benchmarking, sharing data, mutual self-help advice on fund raising highlight the achievements of business schools influence government policy directly
    71. 71. ABS 2010 Annual Conference The Bologna Effect: Developments in European Higher Education Dr Christian Yeomans UK Higher Education International and Europe Unit www.europeunit.ac.uk www.international.ac.uk
    72. 72. Session overview • UK HE International and Europe Unit • Setting the scene – higher education on centre stage in Europe • The Bologna Process • EU Education and Research • Europe Unit Survey (2009 • Opportunities and challenges for the UK HE sector 2010 onwards 2
    73. 73. UK HE Europe Unit • Universities UK • HE Funding Councils for England, Scotland and Wales and DELNI • GuildHE • Quality Assurance Agency 4
    74. 74. Anniversary conference, March 2010  Ministerial anniversary conference, 11-12 March 2010  David Lammy MP, Prof Colin Riordan, (UK HE sector) Anthony McClaran, QAA; Aaron Porter, NUS; Separate Scottish delegation 4
    75. 75. Key Bologna Process reforms • Bachelor – Master – Doctoral cycles (UK already uses this structure) • Overarching Framework for Qualifications of the EHEA (2005) (UK HE qualifications frameworks self-certified) • European Standards and Guidelines for Quality Assurance in the EHEA (Quality Assurance Agency – QAA) 5
    76. 76. Key Bologna Process reforms • European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) (Experience of using credit – NUCCATS, SCQF) • Diploma Supplement (New challenge – development of HEAR) 5
    77. 77. Bologna Process 2009-2012: Leuven Communiqué  Student mobility: in 2020, 20% of students graduating in the European Higher Education Area should have had a study or training period abroad  Lifelong Learning: Ministers formally acknowledged learning outcomes as the basis for recognition of formal and informal learning.  ‘Multidimensional transparency tools’: BFUG to monitor development of classifications/typologies and rankings of HEIs  Expanding Bologna’s remit: to include additional policy areas  International dimension enhanced in 2009 6
    78. 78. EU 2020 Strategy - 1 • Replaces the Lisbon Agenda • Main aims - universities are central to: • exiting Europe from the economic crisis; and • future international positioning • Initiatives and consultations launched this year will have long term impacts for EU funding programmes 7
    79. 79. EU 2020 Strategy - 2  Through the Strategy, the Commission identifies three key drivers for growth: 1. smart growth - fostering knowledge, innovation, education and digital society 2. sustainable growth - making production more resource efficient while increasing competitiveness… and 3. inclusive growth - raising participation in the labour market and in education and training. 8
    80. 80. Research agenda in the EU • Framework Programmes for Research and Development (FP7: 2007-2013) • UK sector policy position on the future of European research: • Strong support for the European Research Council • research excellence and capacity-building • Sustainability of funding • full-economic costing Available at www.europeunit.ac.uk – in either, English, German, French or Polish 9
    81. 81. Europe Unit Survey - 2009 To assess UK HEIs engagement in European initiatives - Diploma Supplement; - Use of ECTS; - Masters degrees; - Mobility - Institutional strategies and responsibility for Bologna; and Joint degrees. 22
    82. 82. Looking ahead in the UK – priorities for the future  Diploma Supplement  European Credit Transfer and Accumulation System  2011 conference: ‘You , the EHEA and the wider world’ 1 February  Sustained engagement in the Bologna Process  European Research agenda
    83. 83. European Higher Education Area - Opportunities for UK HE sector • Greater student mobility - joint degrees, credit points, qualifications frameworks • Recognition of qualifications - for study and employment • Attractiveness of European and UK HE worldwide • Influence on future of European HE 10
    84. 84. European Higher Education Area - Challenges for UK HE sector • Perception of UK qualifications in the EHEA - Need for visible ‘Bologna-compatibility’ - UK qualifications ‘lightweight’ in terms of workload? • Competition for EU and international students - Teaching through English - Lower tuition fees - More of a ‘Bologna’ degree? 11
    85. 85. Competition for international students Joint report with UK HE International Unit •France •Germany •Netherlands •Poland •Spain •Switzerland •Sweden •United Kingdom 20 Available: www.europeunit.ac.uk
    86. 86. The UK HE Europe Unit • For further information visit: www.europeunit.ac.uk • Or email: christian.yeomans@europeunit.ac.uk 11
    87. 87. ALWAYS LEARNING How can technology be an engine of growth in the future of business education? RICHARD STAGG PUBLISHING DIRECTOR HIGHER & PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
    88. 88. “Five years from now on the web for free you’ll be able to find the best lectures in the world. It will be better than any single university.” Bill Gates Will technology be an engine of growth or disruption for business schools?
    89. 89. PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE : THE PEARSON PERSPECTIVE
    90. 90. PEARSON PAST, PRESENT & FUTURE : THE WORLD’S LEADING EDUCATION COMPANY 2.6 2.3 2.0 1.7 1.4 1.2 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.4 0.4 0.3 Pearson 5.8 3.3 Education revenues, $bn 2008 data
    91. 91. PEARSON: SOME CLUES TO OUR FUTURE Education | International | Technology
    92. 92. NEXT? WHAT’S CHANGING CUSTOMER DEMAND BUSINESS EDUCATION LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES
    93. 93. WHAT NEXT? changing business customer expectations “Learning is what most people will do for a living in the 21st Century” S.J Perelman But how? • More demand for learning the more you know the faster you go • More life-long learning from classroom to boardroom • More integrated, applied learning from know what to know how from case-based to practice-based • More focussed on outcomes learners as consumers vocational choices
    94. 94. WHAT NEXT? changing business customer expectations “Let go of the cult of rational analysis. Soft skills are actually the currency of the realm in these times” Financial Times, Business Education.April 2010 • More soft-skills (with the hard analysis) communication, coaching, collaboration, creativity, character • More fast and flexible learning from place-based to everywhere more step on and off points shorter programmes, quick results • More personalised learning the learner takes control
    95. 95. WHAT NEXT? changing business schools • The challenge of growth changing funding and fees landscapes new competitors and alternatives • Globalization (and looking East) competing for international customers, developing international curricula competing or cooperating with global partners • Building “soft” skills & context into courses without losing the hard analysis • Building flexible portfolios of programmes - multiple levels, durations and locations
    96. 96. WHAT NEXT? changing business schools “There are challenges … but technology is the key facilitator” Gabriel Hawawani, INSEAD The Future of Business Schools, JMD • Teaching the next generation of student consumers engaging them with stimulating learning managing high expectations & diverse abilities • Effective use of valuable faculty and resources more efficient, more creative • Extending reach – over time and space growing beyond the core campus serving new networks of lifelong learners • Building reputation and brand crafting a distinct learning experience
    97. 97. WHAT NEXT? learning technologies are changing too • MOBILE LEARNING • SOCIAL NETWORKS: SOCIAL LEARNING • GAMING &VIRTUAL WORLDS • ANYTIME,ANYWHERE LEARNING
    98. 98. WHAT NOW? “The anecdotal evidence is very strong that, in the US, the smartest students don’t go to lectures. There are just better ways, better models, better pedagogues.” Don Tapscott How technology can be an engine of growth for business schools
    99. 99. WHAT’S EFFECTIVE HERE? IMPROVING BUSINESS EDUCATION CONTENT + + +TECHNOLOGY SERVICESASSESSMENT Online, all the time: personalised learning and data-driven assessment
    100. 100. THE MYLAB STORY “We couldn’t keep track of student progress by setting home-work, as marking 800 pieces of work is simply too time-consuming . There was no practical way of giving feedback that would actually benefit the students.” “We have a significant number of international students, for whom English is not their first language and they do struggle with keeping up in lectures.” a snapshot of technology in action for business education
    101. 101. MYLABS FOR THE LEARNER Personalised study | Practice | Feedback
    102. 102. MYLABS FOR THE LEARNER Engagement | Experience | Application
    103. 103. MYLABS FOR THE INSTRUCTOR Teaching effectiveness | Assignment | Assessment
    104. 104. THE MYLAB STORY IS IT WORKING? “MyAccountingLab’s instant feedback holds the interest of a newer generation of learners.As a learning tool, it not only indicates right or wrong but also shows students why they didn’t get it right the first time and how to do it right” “With so many students, an online resource that marks the assignments and gives feedback was invaluable.” “Some students are slower, and some are faster.With MAL neither group impedes the class as a whole.They all get exactly what they need at their own pace.” “Distance learning students don’t have the same access to me. MAL offers them access to the resources and the ability to walk through a problem [Help Me Solve This] immediately, at any hour.” “MyEconLab gives professors more time to spend doing what we want to do: teach”
    105. 105. MYLABS FOR THE BUSINESS SCHOOL AN ENGINE FOR GROWTH? • Higher student performance : lower drop-out rates • Improved student experience and satisfaction (key on assessment & feedback) • Improved assimilation of international students into courses • Faculty freed to teach and create higher-value learning experiences • Better management of space and operating costs • Increased reach; on and beyond campus BUTTO BE REALLY EFFECTIVE …
    106. 106. THE MYLAB STORY WHAT WE’RE LEARNING . . . IT’S NOT ABOUT A PRODUCT FOR THE EDUCATOR: It’s all about behaviour. What teaching and management challenges do you see? FOR PEARSON: It’s all about service and support We’re learning where we can help
    107. 107. AND SO,A PEARSON STRATEGY • Using technology to personalize learning • Using testing to help as well as measure learning • Taking a more active role in teaching practice • Being the world’s English teacher
    108. 108. PEARSON’S FUTURE IN BUSINESS EDUCATION? “The driver of change has been the management of educational process, with testing and assessment at its heart. Pearson Education’s deals to act as preferred supplier to a number of UK schools marks the point at which the vision to deliver connected content, management and services is finally becoming reality” Outsell Insights 2010 • WE CAN HELPWITH… • CURRICULUM CONTENT • CUSTOM CONTENT • QUALIFICATIONS • LEARNING MANAGEMENT • FORMATIVE ASSESSMENT • HIGH-STAKES ASSESSMENT • DISTANCE or FLEXIBLE LEARNING • TEACHING with TECHNOLOGY • PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT • DEEPER PARTNERSHIPS?
    109. 109. ALWAYS LEARNING ANY QUESTIONS? richard.stagg@pearson.com RICHARD STAGG PUBLISHING DIRECTOR HIGHER & PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
    110. 110. Learning from our students…Learning from our students… Clive Robertson Steve Probert
    111. 111. AgendaAgenda 1. Surveys and League Tables: Indicators of quality? 2. NSS: what the results tell us 3. PTES: what the results tell us 4. Student Focus Group 5. Discussion 6. Action
    112. 112. “Statistically risible exercise in neoliberal populism” An outsourced non-academic exercise, the outcomes of which reflect annual student response rate on “satisfaction” and institutional incentives and inducements to respond. Academics from University of Brighton, letter to THES 30.09.2010
    113. 113. “Part of the reason that we have put some effort into different forms of assessment and feedback (discussed at length in course management meetings) was to address specific weaknesses which had been picked up in the NSS. Among other things, we are much more rigorous than we were in the past about calibrating marks for essay assignments, and giving clear guidelines on what (say) 60% or 70% might mean. We’ve also looked at ways of giving generic feedback to a group, on a piece of coursework, sometimes even before we are ready to release the final marks and individual feedback” BMAF Key Contact September 2010
    114. 114. • “Our institution has made changes - especially to encourage high completion rates of NSS (through forms that look a bit like bribery). I suspect that on the whole this encourages the non-complainers - so scores increase - which is I guess why we do so!” • “Clearly the NSS results create an agenda - as they are used in performance reporting, as key management metrics and in public debate. We react to "poor scores" - though our degrees all get good / better than average scores so the only thing we have had to react to is "feedback" - which is nationwide I believe one of the worst scores.” BMAF Key Contacts September 2010
    115. 115. “Whether or not "reactions" are rational / economic or in any sense to the real benefit of students' education is a mute point. Feedback is a point in issue here as though scores are low (relatively) we KNOW that many students don't use the feedback we give. For example if they get a grade on-line they often never pick up the detailed comments sheets. So what does the University suggest - that we provide audio recorded feedback to all students - is this sensible / economic etc? Doubtful as that will probably ignored to - but it might help our scores!” “It seems students were very upset by not getting a "grade" - and that was all they really wanted to look at - not to LEARN from feedback!” • BMAF Key Contacts September 2010
    116. 116. What best predict a good-quality university education are measures of “educational process” including: class size, teaching staff, the effort students make, and the quality and quantity of feedback Prof Graham Gibbs “Dimensions of Quality” HEA September 2010
    117. 117. • Data on university funding, research performance, reputation and student entry grades – often used by newspaper league tables – are poor indicators of quality but do serve to enhance reptation. • Information about graduate earnings and employment tell applicants little about the quality of education they can expect. • NSS collects students’ views on feedback - but broader judgements about whether teaching is “good” are “open to all kinds of subjective variation in the interpretation of what “good” means. Prof Graham Gibbs “Dimensions of Quality”, HEA September 2010
    118. 118. • There is a potential gap between reputation and the quality of the academic experience • Many students will choose “reputation” …personal networks, social recognition, employment premium • Others choose where they are confident they will be taught conscientiously, imaginatively and effectively • We shouldn’t chase the fool’s gold of rankings based on the latter. .. but continue to enhance the quality of teaching across all institutions Prof Sir David Watson, reported in THES
    119. 119. Analysis of 2009 NSS dataAnalysis of 2009 NSS data Business and Administrative Studies
    120. 120. Mean results for the main categories
    121. 121. Mean overall satisfaction of UK students
    122. 122. Teaching experience of UK students
    123. 123. Assessment and Feedback Experience of UK students
    124. 124. Academic Support Experience of UK students
    125. 125. The main areas of concern for UK students: Teaching, Assessment and Feedback Academic Support
    126. 126. Results of International Students responses to Business Degrees
    127. 127. Categorisation of International Students
    128. 128. Breakdown of results by International students Teaching
    129. 129. Breakdown of results by International students Assessment and Feedback
    130. 130. Breakdown of results by International students Academic Support
    131. 131. Breakdown of results by International students Organisation and Management
    132. 132. Breakdown of results by International students Learning Resources
    133. 133. Breakdown of results by International students Personal Development
    134. 134. International Students: Analysis by category
    135. 135. International Student Experience Teaching
    136. 136. International Student Experience Assessment and Feedback
    137. 137. International Student Experience Academic Support
    138. 138. International Student Experience Organisation and Management
    139. 139. International Student Experience Learning Resources
    140. 140. International Student Experience Personal Development
    141. 141. International Student Experience Overall Satisfaction
    142. 142. Postgraduate Taught Experience SurveyPostgraduate Taught Experience Survey 2010 saw the second full administration of PTES with responses from a total of 32,638 students from 76 UK higher education institutions (HEIs) (compared with 14,421 students from 30 HEIs in 2009). The demographic profile of 2010 respondents is broadly similar to that of 2009 respondents and of the taught postgraduate population overall, evidenced by HESA statistics http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/resources/detail/ourwork/postgraduate/ptes_2010_final_report
    143. 143. The questions were structured in ten main sections: Section A. Motivations Section B. Quality of teaching and learning Section C. Assessment and feedback Section D. Dissertation Section E. Organisation and management Section F. Learning resources Section G. Skills and personal development Section H. Career and professional development Section I. Overall satisfaction Section J. Further comments
    144. 144. On the whole, taught postgraduate students were very positive about their experiences: For example, 85% [84%] agreed that their overall experience had met or exceeded their expectations. This is a similar proportion to final-year undergraduates and postgraduate research students, evidenced by the 2009 NSS and PRES results respectively. Taught postgraduates said that their experiences met or exceeded their expectations most strongly in terms of skills and personal development (90% [89%] agreed), career and professional development (88% [86%]), learning resources (87% [86%]) and quality of learning and teaching (83% [82%]), and least strongly in terms of organisation and management of the programme (76% [76%]) and assessment and feedback (75% [74%]).
    145. 145. The top two motivational factors for taking a taught postgraduate programme were considered to be to improve employment prospects and to progress in their current career path. The most common reasons for studying on a taught postgraduate programme at their particular institution were the location and the reputation of the institution (each 39%),closely followed by the institution’s reputation in the chosen subject area. Location of institution has risen by 3% and from second ranking in 2009 to joint first.
    146. 146. Taught postgraduate students rated the quality of their teaching and learning and staff very highly, being most positive (more than 80% agreement) about the intellectual stimulation gained on the course; about staff enthusiasm about what they were teaching, and about Staff being good at explaining things. But…a number of teaching and learning items were rated lower in results for 2010 than in the previous year.
    147. 147. Students’ views on teaching and learning, and staff 2009, 2010Students’ views on teaching and learning, and staff 2009, 2010 • The course is intellectually stimulating 84% 83% • Staff are enthusiastic about what they are teaching 83% 83% • Staff are good at explaining things 83% 80% • The teaching and learning methods are effective for this type of • Programme 81% 79% • Staff made the subject interesting 77% 76% • I am happy with the teaching support I received from staff on my • Course 71% 71% • There is sufficient contact time (face to face and/or virtual/online) between staff and students to support effective learning 67% 68%
    148. 148. Students’ views on assessment and feedback, 2009, 2010Students’ views on assessment and feedback, 2009, 2010 • Assessment arrangements and marking have been fair 74% 72% • The criteria used in marking have been made clear in advance 74% 71% • I have received detailed comments (written or oral) on my work 68% 66% • Feedback on my work has helped me clarify things I did not understand 58% 58% • Feedback on my work has been prompt 57% 57% • I received feedback in time to allow me to improve my next assignment 57% 56%
    149. 149. The three most common disciplines of respondents were business and administrative studies (23.3%), education (11.3%) and social studies (10.3%). These hardly vary from the 2009 results. The rest were widely distributed between many other disciplines
    150. 150. Profile of respondents, by discipline, 2008, 2009, 2010Profile of respondents, by discipline, 2008, 2009, 2010 Overall, the 2010 PTES sample of respondents is broadly representative of the postgraduateOverall, the 2010 PTES sample of respondents is broadly representative of the postgraduate taught student population across the UK and so findings paint a picturetaught student population across the UK and so findings paint a picture that broadly reflects the views of taught postgraduate students across the UK.that broadly reflects the views of taught postgraduate students across the UK. • Business and administrative studies 28.2% 23.2% 23.3% • Social studies 9.2% 10.7% 10.3% • Education 8.9% 12.0% 11.3% • Subjects allied to medicine 8.2% 6.0% 7.7% • Engineering and technology 8.0% 7.7% 6.9% • Computer science 5.4% 3.0% 3.0% • Biological sciences 4.9% 6.8% 7.3% • Creative arts and design 4.7% 4.0% 4.7% • Law 4.1% 5.4% 4.4% • Architecture, building and planning 3.5% 2.7% 2.1% • Languages 3.1% 4.2% 3.4% • Historical and philosophical studies 3.0% 3.8% 3.3% • Mass communications and documentation 2.6% 2.4% 3.3% • Medicine and dentistry 2.3% 3.0% 3.2% • Physical sciences 2.2% 2.0% 2.6% • Mathematical sciences 0.8% 1.0% 0.8% • Agriculture and related subjects 0.6% 0.3% 0.3% • Combined 0.2% 1.6% 1.8% • Veterinary science 0.1% 0.2% 0.3%
    151. 151. Just under two-thirds (63%, compared with 59% in 2009) of the students were self-funded, less than a fifth (16%, compared with 20% for 2009) were funded by their employer, and one in twelve (8%) in both 2009 and 2010) were funded by their institution, for example through a bursary or scholarship.
    152. 152. Just under half (49%, compared with 55% in 2009) were in paid employment at the time of the survey. Of those who were in paid employment, two-thirds (63%, compared with 69% in 2009) worked more than 30 hours in a typical week during term time, and one in eight (12%, compared with 9% in 2009) worked up to ten hours a week.
    153. 153. Summary of multiple regression analysisSummary of multiple regression analysis Scales Beta Significant? Rank 2010 Rank 2009 • Teaching and learning 0.330 Yes (.000) 1 1 • Skills and personal development 0.176 Yes (.000) 2 2 • Career and professional development 0.133 Yes (.000) 3 4 • Organisation and management 0.132 Yes (.000) 4 3 • Assessment and feedback 0.078 Yes (.000) 5 5 • Learning resources -0.061 Yes (.000) 6 7 • Dissertation 0.000 No (.957) 7 6
    154. 154. Student Focus Group, Oxford, October 2010Student Focus Group, Oxford, October 2010 11 students from 6 universities Undergraduates, postgraduates, full time, part time, EU/UK and International 1. Graduates with impact: Do you feel well prepared for developing a successful career? How can universities make sure you are well prepared? 2. Better Teaching: How can we improve the learning experiences and opportunities offered to our students? 3. Flexibility in Learning: What approaches to learning and assessment do you prefer and why?
    155. 155. Graduates with ImpactGraduates with Impact • Work experience • Extra-curricular learning opportunities • Working links with alumni • On-going employer contributions to course • Pro-active careers advice • Working in multi-cultural groups • Student engagement • Independent learning But, PDP not valued
    156. 156. We asked students what they thought the attributes ofWe asked students what they thought the attributes of graduates should be.graduates should be. • Reliability • Honesty • Ethical behaviour • Confidence and self esteem • Tenacity • Respect for others • Humility • Reflective practice • Appetite for learning, and learning skills • Innovation and creativity • Communication and interpersonal skills • Technical skills • Political awareness • Pro-activity • Passion • Humour
    157. 157. Employers say:Employers say: *Personal communication skills; using numbers, words and technology; team-working, customer care….. Also a “positive approach”, being ready to participate, make suggestions and accept new ideas and constructive criticism… **Honesty and trustworthiness, commitment, adaptability and accountability… *Report from UK Commission for Employment which compares 20 published definitions and found no agreement ** Recruitment company Reed surveyed 800 employers
    158. 158. Better teachingBetter teaching • Less group work, unless explicitly to develop team-working skills • Manage disruptive influences • Smaller groups • Less Powerpoint • Legible handwriting • Examples of successful assignments, so students know what is expected • Regular “homework” and class tests • Interactivity in lectures, less didactic • Good staff/student relations • Staff pro-active in encouraging learning • Peer review • “Challenge” meetings, Dragons’ Den, Debates • Variety of teaching methods • Relate theory to practice • Opportunities to engage with employers and the work place • Constructive feedback dialogue • Contemporary issues in business • Rewards for good teaching…
    159. 159. Flexible learningFlexible learning • Social networking sites, texting, mobile phone apps, UTube – not just VLE • On-line lectures and podcasts • Involve students in decisions on assignments and deadlines • Student engagement with curriculum development • Use “real life” contemporary case studies • Simulations and role play • Work-based learning • Extra-curricular learning • Independent learning
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