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Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
Selling Agile
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Selling Agile

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This presentation looks at questions surrounding how to best sell agile in your organization. Presented by Michele Sliger.

This presentation looks at questions surrounding how to best sell agile in your organization. Presented by Michele Sliger.

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  • 1. Selling Agile Michele Sliger michele@sligerconsulting.com
  • 2. Michele Sliger Sliger Consulting, Inc. www.sligerconsulting.com  Over 20 years of software development experience, with the last 8 in Agile  Certified Scrum Trainer  BS-MIS, MBA, PMP  Co-author along with Stacia Broderick of: Preview chapters from The Software Project Manager’s Bridge to Agility at: www.informit.com/title/0321502752 www.amazon.com 2© 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc.
  • 3. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 3 What We’ll Cover •  What do we mean by “selling agile”? •  To pitch or not to pitch •  Selling agile to management •  Selling agile to the business •  Selling agile to the team •  Selling by not selling: alternative techniques •  Time for your questions – let’s play Stump the Presenter!
  • 4. Let’s Define “Selling” •  First answering “why agile?” •  Learning what people are interested in •  Exploring alternatives to a current problem or issue •  Ultimately answering the question “what’s in it for me?” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 4
  • 5. VersionOne’s 2008 Survey Agile development is delivering meaningful and measurable business results. Respondents reporting specific improvements greater than 10% include: * Increased Productivity – 89% of respondents * Reduced Software Defects – 84% of respondents * Accelerated Time-to-Market – 83% of respondents * Reduced Cost – 65% of respondents © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 5
  • 6. Amazing Results! © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 6 Industry Average  Folle2 (using XP)  ∆  Project Cost  3.5 million  2.2 million  ‐1.3 million  Schedule  12.6 months  7.8 months  ‐4.8 months  Cumula?ve Defects  2890  1450  ‐50%  Staffing  35  35 (co‐located)  n/a  Industry Average  BMC (using Scrum)  ∆  Project Cost  5.5 million  5.2 million  ‐.3 million  Schedule  15 months  6.3 months  ‐8.7 months  Defects During QA  713  635  ‐11%  Staffing  40  93 (distributed)  +52  BMC: a larger than average team with faster than average builds and average bug rates. Studies show an increase in bugs when using offshore development: there is a 280% increase from Industry Average to Offshore Average in a standard waterfall environment. Therefore BMC’s success and average bug count while using offshore teams is quite remarkable. Source: Michael Mah for the Cutter Consortium and QMS Case Study: The Impact of Agile on Productivity at Five Companies (webinar) 11 – Mgmt support 33 – Developers 37 – QA 2 – Integration 3 – I18N 2 – Build team 5 – Other 18 – Engineers 6 – Testers 1 – Writer 2 – Program Leads 1 – Customer Proxy 7 – added later in the project
  • 7. Let’s Define “Selling” •  First answering “why agile?” •  Learning what people are interested in •  Exploring alternatives to a current problem or issue •  Ultimately answering the question “what’s in it for me?” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 7
  • 8. “Selling”? “Are we selling or building trust?” – Hubert Smits “I really don't "sell" anything, and don't even think that I can do so very well. What I can do, on my best days, is to listen to what someone wants, what they are having trouble with, and suggest a specific thing to do to make that part of their life better.” – Ron Jeffries © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 8
  • 9. Let’s Define “Selling” •  First answering “why agile?” •  Learning what people are interested in •  Exploring alternatives to a current problem or issue •  Ultimately answering the question “what’s in it for me?” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 9
  • 10. Do we really want to make a sales pitch? © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 10
  • 11. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 11 Hurdling Resistance •  From Management: –  Avoid it - fly under the radar –  Advocate using their language –  Share success stories •  From the Business: –  Get them involved early! –  Satisfaction guaranteed or your money back –  Got proxy? –  Start with the technical practices •  From the team: –  Get the right people on the bus (Jim Collins “Good to Great”) AND the wrong people off the bus –  Empower them and give them a guide
  • 12. Selling to Management
  • 13. “Things are fine, why do we need to change?” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 13 •  Maybe everything really is fine •  What’s the real problem? •  Can you help?
  • 14. “Our situation is just too complicated for agile!” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 14 •  FDA? - check •  DOD? - check •  SOX? - check •  Banking? - check •  CMM? - check •  Google “companies using scrum” •  Ask/search online forums
  • 15. “Agile doesn’t allow for long-term planning—how are we supposed to determine budgets?” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 15 Daily Plan Iteration Plan Product Roadmap ReleasePlan Product Vision *Annually by the Product Owner *Twice yearly by the Product Owner *Quarterly by the Product Owner and Teams Bi-weekly by the Teams Daily by the Team Members *These timeframes are guidelines, not rules Mike Cohn’s “Planning Onion”
  • 16. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 16 And there are more onions… Portfolio Planning Corporate Strategic Objectives
  • 17. Budgets are built top-down •  By time: – Number of iterations times the loaded salaries of the team members, plus other expenses •  By feature set: – Estimate the backlog using points – Determine dollar amount per point using average team velocity and loaded salaries © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 17
  • 18. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 18 “Where’s my WBS?” Release Plan Iteration Plan
  • 19. “Where’s my Gantt chart?” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 19 Graphic © Mountain Goat Software, All rights reserved
  • 20. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 20 Burndown Charts Iteration/Time Estimated Scope
  • 21. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 21 Alternatives to Gantt
  • 22. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 22 Dashboard widgets
  • 23. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 23 A Virtual Task Board
  • 24. “We need to matrix our resources to get maximum efficiency” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 24 Source: Gerald Weinberg Quality Software Management Volume 1: Systems Thinking Graphic courtesy of Agile Evolution, Inc.
  • 25. “Our people can’t be trusted to self-organize” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 25 •  This is a bigger issue than simply choosing a new way to develop software •  Flee!
  • 26. Selling to the Business
  • 27. “We don’t have time to work with the teams every single day” •  Remember: they’re time-sliced too •  If you don’t have the time, then who does? •  What is the cost of NOT working with the team? •  Explore alternatives like “office hours” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 27
  • 28. “I can’t wait an entire iteration for that feature!” or “I can’t wait an entire iteration before I get to change my mind!” •  Why not? •  You don’t have to •  Is the iteration too long? © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 28
  • 29. “I have to talk to the engineers? I don’t know how to talk to engineers!” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 29 •  Help with introductions •  Eat and drink together
  • 30. “But we want a fixed price contract” Try asking these questions: •  Do you often find that your requirements change mid-stream, even after everything has been captured and analyzed? •  Would you like to be able to change your mind every two weeks about the features you’ve requested? •  Would you be willing to spend some time with us to help us better understand what your vision is for the implementation of these new features? •  How often have you seen working software in the past, and how often would you like to see working software on this project? Would you like us to show you what we’ve accomplished by demo’ing the product to you every two weeks? © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 30
  • 31. “But we want a fixed price contract” •  How should we mitigate against time constraints? Or against potentially building the wrong thing? –Do you have a prioritized list of work that could help us with this? •  People typically role on and off projects, which can cause delays as information needs to be transferred and absorbed (and can sometimes be lost). How would you like us to handle this? •  Would you like the right to close or cancel the project at any time with only 30 days’ notice? And if all that doesn’t work, then try: •  Let’s spend $5k and build a backlog of work that we can estimate, and confirm if we can do it based on a fixed price © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 31
  • 32. “But we want a fixed price contract” © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 32 •  Check out Jeff Sutherland’s “Money for Nothing and Change for Free” http://agile2008toronto.pbwiki.com/Agile2008+Sessions –  Start with a fixed price and include TM for changes –  Insert a “Change for Free” option: working with the team every iteration allows the customer to make changes for “free” –  Insert a “Money for Nothing” option: Customer may terminate contract early if value has been satisfied for 20% of remaining unbilled contract value
  • 33. Selling to the Team
  • 34. “There are too many meetings!” •  In your current process, how do you know what to work on? –  And how is that working out for you and your customers? •  How much time would you normally spend on planning a quarterly release? –  4 hours x 6 two-week sprints = 24 hours •  How much time would you normally spend on your weekly status meetings? –  4 days x 15 minutes = 60 minutes •  What are these other meetings you’re going to and what do you get out of them? © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 34
  • 35. “If we don’t do any detailed planning, our architecture will fail!” •  Do prepare a high-level architectural vision/plan –  Don’t load it up with detail –  Don’t try to implement it all at once •  Build an architecture runway –  This is part of the cake slice; just build out 1-2 iterations ahead •  60% of software features are rarely or never used –  Don’t build something to support a 60%-er © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 35
  • 36. “We aren’t co-located so we can’t be agile” •  It will be more work to ensure that communications are working properly, but it can be done •  “the most efficient and effective means of communication is via face-to-face”… true enough, so we’ll be a bit less efficient, and sometimes less effective •  You’ll need tools, lots and lots of tools •  You’ll need more documentation •  You’ll need to be watchful of how easy it is to slip back into old waterfall-type habits © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 36
  • 37. The Unspoken Reasons •  I’m afraid of change •  I’m afraid I will have nothing to do •  I’m afraid I will lose my job •  I’m afraid people will see how little I actually do •  I’m afraid I won’t be able to keep up •  I’m afraid I won’t be able to learn the new software •  I’m afraid this will mean hard work •  I’m afraid I’ll be fired if the decisions we make don’t work out •  I’m afraid I won’t get raises or promotions anymore •  I’m afraid of conflict and trying to reach consensus •  Nuts! there go my 3-hour lunches •  Nuts! that means I can’t mosey in at 10:30 anymore •  Nuts! that means I’ll have to really think now •  Nuts! that means I’ll actually have to talk to people now •  It’s just so much easier and safer when someone else tells me exactly what to do •  It’s just so much easier and safer when I can tell them exactly what I want them to do © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 37
  • 38. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 38 “How do we work with non-agile parts of the organization?” Iteration 1 Release Iteration 3Iteration 2 Iteration 4 Backlog • Project Approval • Feature 1 • Feature 2 • Arch. Approval • Feature 3… • Project Approval • Feature 1 • Feature 2 • Arch. Approval • Feature 3 • Feature 4 • Feature 5 • Feature 6 • Feature 7 Project Approval Process To Customer Using “Barely Sufficient” Guidelines Provisional Approval
  • 39. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 39 “How do we work with non-agile parts of the organization?”
  • 40. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 40 “How do we work with non-agile parts of the organization?”
  • 41. Beyond the sales pitch…. •  Be an example •  Socialize, don’t evangelize •  Host brown-bag lunches •  Invite others to join you at local chapter meetings •  Get an outside consultant to do the job © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 41
  • 42. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 42 Additional Resources •  www.apln.org •  www.agilealliance.org •  www.scrumalliance.org •  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scrumdevelopment/ •  http://finance.groups.yahoo.com/group/ agileprojectmanagement/
  • 43. © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 43 Additional Resources •  “Stretching Agile to Fit CMMI Level 3,” an experience report by David J. Anderson: http://www.agilemanagement.net/Articles/Papers/StretchingAgiletoFitCMMIL.html •  “5 Levels of Agile Planning: From Enterprise Product Vision to Team Stand-up,” a white paper by Hubert Smits: http://library.theserverside.com/detail/RES/1169212374_955.html Books: •  Lean Thinking by James P. Womack and Daniel T. Jones •  Scaling Software Agility by Dean Leffingwell •  Agile Estimating and Planning and User Stories Applied by Mike Cohn Sites and Search terms: •  InfoQ •  STSC Crosstalk •  Jeff Sutherland •  Israel Gat •  Mary Poppendieck
  • 44. Let’s play Stump the Presenter!
  • 45. Thank you! www.sligerconsulting.com michele@sligerconsulting.com You may claim 1 PDU under “Category 4 – Other Providers” www.pmi.org
  • 46. Agile Adoption Statistics © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 46
  • 47. More Statistics © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 47 CNN cites Agile as #18 in people, products, trends and ideas that are transforming the world of business. CNN, The 50 Who Matter Now money.cnn.com Davidfrico.com
  • 48. Amazing Results! © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 48 Industry Average  Folle2 (using XP)  ∆  Project Cost  3.5 million  2.2 million  ‐1.3 million  Schedule  12.6 months  7.8 months  ‐4.8 months  Cumula?ve Defects  2890  1450  ‐50%  Staffing  35  35 (co‐located)  n/a  Industry Average  BMC (using Scrum)  ∆  Project Cost  5.5 million  5.2 million  ‐.3 million  Schedule  15 months  6.3 months  ‐8.7 months  Defects During QA  713  635  ‐11%  Staffing  40  93 (distributed)  +52  BMC: a larger than average team with faster than average builds and average bug rates. Studies show an increase in bugs when using offshore development: there is a 280% increase from Industry Average to Offshore Average in a standard waterfall environment. Therefore BMC’s success and average bug count while using offshore teams is quite remarkable. Source: Michael Mah for the Cutter Consortium and QMS Case Study: The Impact of Agile on Productivity at Five Companies (webinar) 11 – Mgmt support 33 – Developers 37 – QA 2 – Integration 3 – I18N 2 – Build team 5 – Other 18 – Engineers 6 – Testers 1 – Writer 2 – Program Leads 1 – Customer Proxy 7 – added later in the project
  • 49. VersionOne’s 2008 Survey Agile development is delivering meaningful and measurable business results. Respondents reporting specific improvements greater than 10% include: * Increased Productivity – 89% of respondents * Reduced Software Defects – 84% of respondents * Accelerated Time-to-Market – 83% of respondents * Reduced Cost – 65% of respondents © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 49
  • 50. VersionOne’s 2008 Survey © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 50
  • 51. VersionOne’s 2008 Survey © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 51
  • 52. VersionOne’s 2008 Survey © 2009 Sliger Consulting, Inc. 52

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