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10 Tips For Presenters

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Often confronted with technical oriented people needed to present things at customer events, I use this to make them aware of some obvious pitfalls, mistakes and do's and don't when presenting.

Often confronted with technical oriented people needed to present things at customer events, I use this to make them aware of some obvious pitfalls, mistakes and do's and don't when presenting.

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  • If you can’t explain something in a simple manner, maybe you don’t understand it well enough yourself…?
  • This one is a no brainer, but somehow Powerpoint makes people think they can get away with it.

    People read at 250 words per minute, you talk at 150 words per minute.

    Plus giving them stuff to read prevents them from listening to you.

    If you don’t know your speech without cues, it shows you don’t really understand your message, a huge blow to any credibility you have with the audience.

    And, it makes the audience think, “why am I here, they could have just emailed me the slides and saved me the trouble of coming here…”
  • Speeches should be entertaining and informative. We all know the dancing monkey but that’s not needed when giving a serious presentation.

    But unlike an e-mail or article, people expect some appeal to their emotions.

    Simply reciting dry facts without any passion or humor will make people less likely to pay attention.
  • Speeches should be entertaining and informative. We all know the dancing monkey but that’s not needed when giving a serious presentation.

    But unlike an e-mail or article, people expect some appeal to their emotions.

    Simply reciting dry facts without any passion or humor will make people less likely to pay attention.
  • It’s not a race.

    Nervous and inexperienced speakers tend to talk way to fast.

    Consciously slow your speech down and add pauses for emphasis.

    This will also help your breathing and in turn allow you to appear relaxed.

    Feeling the urge to use presentation killers like ‘um,’ ‘ah,’ or ‘you know’?

    Replace those with a pause taking a short breath in. The pause may seem a bit awkward, but the audience will barely notice it.
  • Match eye contact with everyone in the room.

    Turn your head, don’t always speak to the same person or the same imaginary point.

    Walk around, gesticulate.

    Be alive, not a drone, engage your audience.
  • Before there were abstract concepts, before there were numbers, there were stories. It’s a fundamental tool for describing ourselves, and the world around us.

    Not always easy with technical presentation.

    If your presentation is going to be a longer one, explain your points through short stories, quips and anecdotes.

    Great speakers know how to use a story to create an emotional connection between ideas for the audience.
  • Be there on time to make sure you are not stressed.

    Give yourself the time to prepare and test anything that needs to be tested. Plan for contingencies.

    Practice your presentation and time yourself, so that you fill the timeslot. Don’t end way to early, NEVER run late as this throws the entire schedule of the event.
  • Don’t assume you’ll be able to wing it.

    Winging it makes that you only say what you think of at the moment, preparation means that you’ll say what needs to be said in an efficient and simple manner.

    Winging it makes for presentations that run way too long…

    Practice your presentation, and your presentation techniques. It doesn’t hurt to know your jokes in advance, but don’t practice gestures that looks too fake.

    Involve family friends and colleagues if you want to hold a dry run.
  • Apologies are only useful if you’ve done something wrong.

    Don’t use them to excuse incompetence or humble yourself in front of an audience.

    Don’t apologize for your nervousness or a lack of preparation time. Most audience members can’t detect your anxiety, so don’t draw attention to it.

    A good way not to be sorry, is be on time, prepare and practice and take it slow.

    If you do manage to mess something up, then you can be sorry.
  • When writing a speech, see it from the audiences perspective.

    What might they not understand?

    What might seem boring?

    Use WIIFM (What’s In It For Me) to guide you.
  • With a little practice you can inject your passion for a subject into your presentations.

    Enthusiasm is contagious.

    And being in the spotlight is addictive…
  • Transcript

    • 1. 1O TIPS Thomas Verschueren ■ Read My Wordpress Blog ■ Follow Me On Twitter ■ See My Linkedin Profile ■ Check Out My Presentations On Slideshare FOR PRESENTERS
    • 2. AS SIMPLE AS POSSIBLE … BUT NO SIMPLER EVERYTHING SHOULD BE MADE
    • 3. BULLET TIME IS GREAT… IN THE MOVIES
    • 4. TRANSFORM THESE KINDS OF SLIDES…  It is imperative for any change process that all involved stakeholders have a clear vision on what is trying to be achieved.  Receptiveness and willingness are key elements  Also stakeholders need to have sufficient time to meet regularly to discuss, plan and share ideas. Both in a formal and informal manner for optimal effect.
    • 5. TIME INTO SOMETHING MORE VISUAL LIKE THIS… CLARITY RECEPTIVENESS
    • 6. AND USE THE SPEAKER NOTES FOR THE BLABLA
    • 7. AND COMMUNICATION IS… THE TRANSFER OF EMOTION
    • 8. SLOW DOWN TAKE IT SLOW… IT’S NOT A RACE
    • 9. EYE CONTACT LOOK THEM IN THE EYES
    • 10. ALWAYS TELL THEM A STORY TELL ME, SHOW ME ENGAGE ME
    • 11. START ON TIME, END ON TIME START ON TIME END ON TIME
    • 12. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT PRACTICE WILL MAKE PERFECT…
    • 13. DON’T BE SORRY DON’T BE, NO, REALLY…
    • 14. IT’S FOR THEM, NOT FOR YOU YOU PROBABLY THINK THIS EVENT IS ABOUT YOU…? YOU’RE SO VAIN
    • 15. HAVE FUN BUT ABOVE ALL… HAVE FUN WHILE DOING IT
    • 16. 1. KEEP IT SIMPLE 2. TALK, DON’T READ 3. BE ENTERTAINING 4. SLOW & STEADY 5. EYE CONTACT 6. ALWAYS TELL THEM A STORY 7. START ON TIME, END ON TIME 8. PRACTICE MAKES PERFECT 9. DON’T APOLOGIZE 10. IT’S FOR THE AUDIENCE, NOT FOR YOU 11. HAVE FUN
    • 17. Thank You Thomas Verschueren ■ Read My Wordpress Blog ■ Follow Me On Twitter ■ See My Linkedin Profile ■ Check Out My Presentations On Slideshare

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