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Home Care Research

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  • Participants - Children (45-60 years old) who have living parents/family not currently in a retirement community or receiving home care and who will influence any decisions on care. - Older adults (60+ years old) who may soon face similar decisions regarding their own care or the care of their spouses. May 18, 2009 – Harrisburg, PA
  • PLANNING/DM PROCESS Older Most do not have a plan in place, but they at least have an idea of their options for long-term care This can be partially attributed to the planning and/or decisions they have had to make for their own parents, resulting in more familiarity with the various options
  • PLANNING/DM PROCESS Older view on long term care Many would consider living with their children, but do not want to burden them with their care needs They have also considered retirement communities vs. home care Most are generally aware of some of the options for home care, but focused more on the medical aspects than the personal care, housekeeping assistance, etc. options Home care is seen as an option that would require less stress, allow them to maintain their independence and be less expensive than an assisted living or “nursing home” option
  • PLANNING/DM PROCESS Children view of best care options None of the children had a firm plan in place for their parents They are hesitant to discuss long-term care with their parents Most feel obligated to take their parents into their homes because they want to ensure they are being well taken care of, remain or maintain some level of independence, are not “stuck” away in a “home,” etc. This “obligation” or “responsibility” is, however, very stressful to respondents. They want to be able to offer their parents the best care and long-term care situation possible, but they struggle with their own lives, commitments, financial situations, and wishes A significant source of fear and guilt is the issue of “when should I do something?” For some, this is more pressing than “what should I do?” For some children, the influence of siblings and other family members makes starting a conversation, or making any definitive plans, difficult and complicated
  • HC VS RC The older group was aware of, but not knowledgeable about, home care as an option Most thought it was medical service only, one for which a doctor’s prescription is required Most of the older respondents were unable to recall the name of one agency/company that provides such a service Those who were aware of home care knew of it as “VNA” Those respondents who mentioned “VNA” generally knew what the hourly rate would be and other details of the service they would expect Children were much more aware of home care options, medical and non-medical – some were familiar because they knew people who worked in the field Children and the older group shared the same pressing/ immediate questions that they would have when considering home care or a retirement community
  • HC VS RC For home care, these included: Cost What services are provided and when? How long have they been in business? Do they do a background check on their employees? What are the employees’ qualifications? For retirement community living, these included: Cost – entry fee? Size of units (apartments, homes, rooms) How is the food? Who would be providing care? What services/events/activities do they offer? What are the employees’ qualifications? What are the surrounding areas like? Is there an open house for potential residents to visit the facility and talk with people?
  • BENEFITS/DRAWBACKS OF HC Benefits include: Less expensive than a retirement community Less traumatic because they would get to stay in their own homes One-on-one attention Ability to maintain freedom/independence Would receive assistance with tasks that are physically challenging Would allow children to still be involved in care, but not fully responsible
  • BENEFITS/DRAWBACKS OF HC Drawbacks include: Limited time for care whereas someone is there all the time at a nursing home Trust – can you trust the people coming into your home? Qualifications of staff/caregivers Coverage – many believe it would require a “prescription” from a doctor. Although this is not true, it is a common misconception Affordability
  • Important to have a solid understanding of what consumers will expect from retirement living in the future and act on that today

Home Care Research Home Care Research Presentation Transcript

  • How mature consumers’ changing perceptions about home care create opportunities for the industry
  • METHODOLOGY METHODOLOGY
  • PLANNING PLANNING
  • RETIREMENT COMMUNITY VS HOME CARE WHAT IS BEST FOR EVERYONE?
  • BEST CARE OPTION Where is best for mom or dad? WHAT IS BEST FOR EVERYONE?
  • HOME CARE OPTION WHAT IS HOMECARE?
  • CONSIDERATIONS CONSIDERATIONS
  • BENEFITS OF HOME CARE PERCEIVED HOMECARE BENEFITS
  • DRAWBACKS OF HOME CARE PERCEIVED HOMECARE DRAWBACKS
    • Learn more
    • Research Insights
    • Targeting the Mature Market
    • Lead Generation
    • To reach us go to http://varsitybranding.com/index.php/contact-us/ or call Matt at 717-652-1277