Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Russia 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Russia 1

119

Published on

7 keys of a global mindset

7 keys of a global mindset

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
119
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Hierarchy/Egalitarianism
  • 2. Hierarchy/Egalitarianism Towards Hierarchy:  According to the book, Russia falls in the middle between the two  In business culture, status is related to one’s age and position  Authority positions are common with “high status” individuals, and they render the appropriate respect.  Meetings are usually devised to be between individuals with equal statuses. Towards Egalitarianism:  Nature of collective good often encourages a flexible and democratic work ethos As a result, Russia falls in the middle between a hierarchical and egalitarian society.
  • 3. Group Focus
  • 4. Group Focus According to the book, Russia falls in the middle between group and individual focus.
  • 5. Relationships
  • 6. Relationships In Soviet Russia, the “blat”, an extensive relationship network that allowed one to exchange resources, was necessary to survival In present day Russia, Russians are slightly more relationship-based in their personal lives  They have longer lasting relationships than Americans  Yet Russian relationships are complex in that they maintain a strong sense of self-other overlap but with a lack of information divulgence Business relationships are slightly more transactional  Russians show a preference for professional, managerial, and negotiation skills over relationships  However, Russians are not completely transactional, as they still maintain small business networks in which everyone is not permitted to infiltrate
  • 7. Communication Style
  • 8. Communication Style Russians maintain both a strong, high context direct and indirect communication preference. Words may be lost in translation, leading communication to be confusing Relationships and group size determine how direct Russians are In negotiations, they are very quick to disagree and draw out the discussion Indirect communication reflects character  Direct eye contact is considered a sign of respect  Constant smiling is seen as disingenuous and foolish  A handshake is the preferred greeting. No gloves though!
  • 9. Time Orientation
  • 10. Time Orientation Feeling of uncertainty and of lack of control  Thus, Russians prefer short-term planning to long-term planning, which is only seen as a formality  In addition, Russians generally see it as impossible to set deadlines Soviet time orientation was based on the Future and the Past, while Traditional Russian time orientation is based on the Present and the Past. Juxtaposition in what Russians want in regards to time orientation to what they get in regards to time orientation  94 % of Russians indicated that they would prefer flexible working schedules, yet only 17 % of Russian companies permit them
  • 11. Change Tolerance
  • 12. Change Tolerance According to the book: middle left towards change adverse
  • 13. Motivation/Work-Life Balance
  • 14. Motivation/Work-Life Balance High levels of work-related stress Traditionally see works as a means to an end rather than an end itself Russians work shorter days  Only 0.2% of employees work very long hours whereas the average employee in the OECD works 9% Russians work more hours though  Russians work 1,976 hours, and the average OECD employee works 1,749 hours. Yet, the average amount of hours Russians spend on leisure and personal care a day is 14.76 hours.
  • 15. References Radaev, V. (2003, July). How trust is established in economic relationships. Presentation delivered at Cepr/wdi annual international conference on transition economies, Budapest, Hungary. Retrieved from http://www.cepr.org.uk/meets/wkcn/7/756/papers/radaev.pdf

×