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Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation
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Frik Landman - The Role of Management Development in Value Formation

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  • This wealth map shows which territories have the greatest wealth when Gross Domestic Product (GDP) is compared using currency exchangerates. This indicates international purchasing power - what someone’s money would be worth if they wanted to spend it in another territory
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    • 1. The role of management development in value formationYour partner in world-classbusiness learningAugust 2012 Barrett Values Centre International Conference
    • 2. Management Development Value FormationSetting the Scene for a Africa conversation 2
    • 3. So, here we are 2.3 M Years later Homo Sapiens arises from 1st Modern Man leaves Africa Homo Habilis H.Heidelbergensis in Africa (last ofHomo migrations) 2.3-1.44 MYA Homo Rudolfensis ca 55 KYABig Bang 400 KYAOur Universebegins13.7BYA 2012AD ca300KYA 500KYA Homo Neanderthalensis from H.Heidelbergensis in Africa H. Sapiens Sapiens (Modern Man) evolves ability to speak 3
    • 4. TITLE: eg. Marketing Subtitle/Description: Eg. Online Marketing Faculty Name: eg. Godfrey Parkin Date: 2012/10/231 March 2012 ‹#›
    • 5. Healing Our World
    • 6. 10/23/2012 6
    • 7. Tertiary Education Tertiary education is university education and post secondary vocational training 7
    • 8. Science Research1 March 2012 8
    • 9. Mercantile and Business Exports1 March 2012 9
    • 10. Wealth 10
    • 11. POVERTY • Poverty is not just a financial state. • Being poor affects life in many ways. • Non-financial elements of poverty, such as • life expectancy, • adult literacy, • water quality, • and children that are underweight. • This implies that the poor in richer territories are materially better off. The highest human poverty index scores are in Central Africa, the lowest are in Japan1 March 2012 11
    • 12. So, the Task at Hand is Clear: It is vitally important to Africa’s resources need build capacity, especiallyto be turned into results new era managers, in for its people order to achieve results. We need sustainable economic growth and social development in Africa
    • 13. New Era Managers with Different Ethos• A different ethos. • Informs our aims e.g.: • Sound governance• Caring for the whole. • poverty reduction, child and practice :• A mind-set that will engage maternal mortality, the • ensuring wide participation, others to build, in a environmental sustainability • insisting on transparency, society, a set of distinctive of development, the • responsive to the needs of empowerment of women or • ways of living together, others and the environment, combating the HIV/AIDS • perform art and pandemic, creation and • abiding by the Rule of Law, literature together, sharing of wealth, etc. • developing a culture of • An African identity that will go accountability, • value systems and a long way (it is not presented • seeking significant • beliefs that care for as a panacea) to attract consensus, managing others and the business, FDI, and effectiveness and efficiency environment contributing to economic and and staying true to the social innovation. strategic vision.These new era Such an An ethosleaders …….. ethos…. driven… 13
    • 14. SD Question for Schools of Management in Africa People with the Facilitate, Teach, Lea Best practices and ‘right’ d, Influence, Support methods skills, knowledge and , Inform, Convince approach How should Who Manage Whom to do What When? People and their The work to be Timing in Change, Worldview and their done, tasks, objectiv Life Cycles Stages, Thinking Systems es, outcomes, decisio and Internal and within a particular ns External Conditions Culture 14
    • 15. Graves:“Briefly, what I am proposingis that the psychology of the 8. TURQUOISE GlobalView 30YA ”We experience”mature human being is anunfolding, emergent, oscillati 7. YELLOW 50YAng, spiraling process marked FlexFlow ”I learn” 150YAby progressive subordination 6. GREENof older, lower-behavior 5. ORANGE StriveDrive 300YA HumanBond ”We become” ”I improve” 5KYAsystems to newer, higher- 10KYA 4. BLUEorder systems as man’s 3. RED Power God 50KYA TruthForce ”We are saved” ”I control”existential problems change.” 1. BEIGE 100KYA 2. PURPLE Survival Sense KinSpirits ”I survive” ”We are safe” 15
    • 16. Theoretical framework on human development Spiral Dynamics® is a bio-psycho-socio-spiritual framework for understanding the cores of human thinking. Based on the original work of Dr. Clare W. Graves in emergent deep value systems, Spiral Dynamics® : • helps identify the principles of how people change, organize, emerge in consciousness, make choices, create strategies and communicate. • It unveils the hidden codes that shape human nature, • liberate global diversity, • and drive or slow social and organizational transformation and elaboration 16
    • 17. So it helps us… By exploring and • HOW people think about things (as describing the core opposed to “what” they think)intelligences and deep values that flow • WHY people make decisions in different beneath what we waysbelieve and do, offering • WHY people respond to different a profoundly motivators incisive, dynamic • WHY and HOW values arise and spreadperspective on complex matters such as: • The nature of CHANGE 17
    • 18. Spiral Dynamic Model 8. TURQUOISE GlobalView ”We experience” 7. YELLOW FlexFlow ”I learn” 6. GREEN 5. ORANGE HumanBond StriveDrive ”We become” ”I improve” 4. BLUE 3. RED TruthForce Power God ”We are saved” ”I control” 1. BEIGE 2. PURPLE Survival Sense KinSpirits ”I survive” ”We are safe” 18
    • 19. VMEMEBeck and Cowan have enhanced the theory by drawing from the promising science of memetics, the study of “memes.”Coined by English biologist Richard Dawkins in The Selfish Gene (Oxford 1976). A concept similar to “genes,” the biologicalcode carriers of DNA that would show the same replicating influence culturally. The result was the term “meme” from theGreek word “mimeme,” imitation.Memes are • cultural units of information, “viruses of the mind,” • cultural “DNA” that self-replicate by means of thought-contagion. • Using the human mind as a host, memes attach themselves to individuals, organizations, entire cultures, and societies. • A world view, A valuing system, A belief structure • An organizing principle • A way of thinking or a mode of adjustment • A core intelligence that forms systems and directs human behaviorBeck and Cowan added the term “vMEMEs,” for value-memes representing Value Systems:A framework for the development of a worldview, a set of priorities, a paradigm, a mind-set, an organizing mentalframework for deep-level thinking at the threshold of no negotiation. 19
    • 20. Reality and our WorldviewOur reality : informed by the constructs we have created.Values, beliefs and experiences are such constructs or hypotheses: • values are constructs that we hold as important; • beliefs are constructs that we hold to be true; • and experiences are constructs about reality.These hypotheses impact on how we interpret the outer world of nature, things and people, and also on our level ofawareness, which in turn depends on our value priorities.An evolution of world views: • Our world view has a deep impact on almost every aspect of our lives (Biological, Psychological, Social, Spiritual) • When a world view shifts, it can be very challenging • Old certainties fade or even become obsolete, certain activities lose their meaning and relationships are challenged. • Without insight it may feel as if life is falling apart or coming to an end.Challenge • How can Management development help managers be more effective at operating within their current world view,? How can 1 March 2012 20 we simultaneously facilitate a process to help managers make the transition from one world view to another?
    • 21. WorldviewA worldview is the set offundamental beliefs, values andorganising principles operatingmostly as unquestioned andunexamined assumptions about thenature of reality. 21
    • 22. Summaryv MEMES COLOR THEME FOCUS THINKING VALUE SYSTEMS--BOTTOM LIFESTYLE LINESLevel 8 Turquoise Whole View We Holistic Harmony and Holism Lives for WisdomLevel 7 Yellow FlexFlow Me Systemic Natural Processes of Order & Lives for Change MutualityLevel 6 Green Human Bond We Humanistic Equality and Human Social Bond Lives for HarmonyLevel 5 Orange StriveDrive Me Materialistic Success and Material Gain Lives for GainLevel 4 Blue TruthForce We Absolutistic Authority, Stability, "One-Right- Lives for Way" LaterLevel 3 Red PowerGods Me Egocentric Power, Glory, Exploitation, No Lives for Boundaries NowLevel 2 Purple Kin Spirits We Animistic Myths, Ancestors, Traditions, Lives for Our People Group 1 March 2012 22Level 1 Beige Survival Me Automatic Staying Alive, Reactive, Basic Lives for
    • 23. So, back to SD’s Question How should Who Teach Whom to do What When? In a the rapidly changing 21st century world one of the fundamental purposes of management development ought to be to render managers fit to deal with unpredictable changes and challenges 24
    • 24. Possible place to start shaping a new ethos: ValuesWhy?• Values represent what is important to us.• Values signify the ideals we hold that give importance and meaning to our lives• Values underpin our beliefs, our choices, our engagements, our entire life• There are challenges e.g. values are not insular. They exist and have meaning within a network of sets of values. Is the value of ‘Truth’ always applicable?• We cannot avoid or exclude the conversation around values and the formation of values if we want to make progress. It would not be fitting for Homo Sapiens! If we understand this we are in a better position to understand and create new, other realities 25
    • 25. Values and skills To be able to express our values in our lives, we need to develop the skills to behave according to our values. 26
    • 26. Workshop 1 2 27
    • 27. Group DiscussionsIf we view a school for management development as a human institutionembracing humanistic and societal values, and that management is acreative art and not a deterministic science, let’s consider:1. The role of business in the 21st century: a. What should business be for? b. Is there a value shift needed in business and if so from what to what? c. The role of schools of management in this formation of values? So, How (Best practices and methods) should Who (People with the ‘right’ skills, knowledge and approach) Teach (Facilitate, Teach, Lead, Influence, Support, Inform, Convince) Whom (People and their Worldview and their Thinking Systems within a particular Culture) to do What (The work to be done, tasks, objectives, outcomes, decisions) When (Life Cycles Stages, and Internal and External Conditions) ?1 March 2012 28
    • 28. Group DiscussionsTex Gunning, President of Unilever Bestfoods Asia:The paradigm that divides the world into the social sector, the private sector, and the governmental sector is notworking. It creates artificial barriers. We are each a constituent of the problem, so we have to combine ourforces, our efforts, and our competencies.Richard Barret writes: In Building a Values‐Driven Organisation, I showed how cultural capital has become the newfrontier of competitive advantage and performance, and that the culture of an organisation is a reflection of thevalues (levels of consciousness) of the leaders. When these two facts are juxtaposed, it becomes obvious that thevalues of the leaders are paramount in determining the success of a company.The values of the leaders determine the culture of the company, and the culture of the company determines itscompetitive advantage. I also showed in Building a Values‐ Driven Organisation how vision‐guided, values‐drivenorganisations that operate from full spectrum consciousness are the most successful organisations on the planet.So, How (Best practices and methods) should Who (People with the ‘right’ skills, knowledge and approach) Teach(Facilitate, Teach, Lead, Influence, Support, Inform, Convince) Whom (People and their Worldview and theirThinking Systems within a particular Culture) to do What (The work to bedone, tasks, objectives, outcomes, decisions) When (Life Cycles Stages, and Internal and External Conditions) ? 29
    • 29. Group DiscussionsRichard Barret quoting Michael Jacobs, a professor at the University of North CarolinasKenan‐Flagler Business School from Wall Street Journal, in an article entitled How BusinessSchools Have Failed Business:There are three profound failures of sound business practices at the root of theeconomic crisis, and none of them have been adequately addressed by ourbusiness schools... Could we have avoided most of the economic problems we nowface if we had a generation of business leaders who were trained in designingcompensation systems that promote long‐term value? And who were educated inthe proper make‐up and responsibilities of boards? And who were enlightened asto how shareholders can use their proxies to affect accountability? I think we couldhave.So, How (Best practices and methods) should Who (People with the ‘right’ skills, knowledge andapproach) Teach (Facilitate, Teach, Lead, Influence, Support, Inform, Convince) Whom (Peopleand their Worldview and their Thinking Systems within a particular Culture) to do What (Thework to be done, tasks, objectives, outcomes, decisions) When (Life Cycles Stages, and Internaland External Conditions) ? 30
    • 30. Group DiscussionsFrom 50+20 Agenda: Management Education for the WorldThe junction in the roadHuman beings are transient creatures. We inhabit this planet for an all-too-brief period and rarely appreciate the larger picture, the long-term view. In the not-so-distantpast, our ancestors wandered the Earth in small bands across a bountiful, seemingly endless landscape. The concept of a limited world was largely ignored.Now things are different. Spectacular technological advances and complex economic systems have allowed us to flourish. Seven billion of us are collectively pressing againstmultiple ecological frontiers. Societal and economic turmoil further threaten to destabilize our world. Given our limited resources and our bad habits of expansion and overconsumption, we cannot expect consistent human progress in the future – at least not for all of us.The time has come to initiate a fundamental change in the way we think and live.Much of our present-day society currently follows the twin tenets of expansion and consumption. Both these behaviours are largely fed by an economic growth model thatimplicitly assumes we inhabit an infinite system. However, as we now know, the system is not infinite but rather a close-knit set of interdependencies; make a mess of onepiece and chances are good we ruin the rest. The current economic model based on unrestricted growth and consumption is obsolete.We stand at a junction in a road:• We can either continue playing the developed world’s economic game of musical chairs, hoping that when the music stops we are not the ones left without a seat. This is a dangerous path, leading to a disrupted world.• The alternative is to attempt something fundamentally different, namely to develop the well-being of all of us – and indeed of all living things – while respecting the limits of the planet.Developing such a new world requires us to find new indicators to measure our progress. In our current paradigm, we often confuse the end with the means. Forexample, governments measure their nation’s well-being with their gross domestic product (GDP), while businesses focus on net profits as the key measure of success. Mostof us measure our own happiness in the context of material wealth only, while losing sight of what is truly important. Instead, we must first determine our common goalsand objectives – only then can we derive appropriate measures, the benchmarks that serve as valid indications of our progress towards a world worth living in.One vital element that will help us achieve these common goals is to ensure that we have leaders equipped to resolve the complex global issues that lie ahead. Thisrequires, among other things, a fundamental transformation of management education. Currently, management education draws its core logic from the “take, make and throw-away” philosophy of the twentieth century.So, How (Best practices and methods) should Who (People with the ‘right’ skills, knowledge and approach) Teach(Facilitate, Teach, Lead, Influence, Support, Inform, Convince) Whom (People and their Worldview and their Thinking Systemswithin a particular Culture) to do What (The work to be done, tasks, objectives, outcomes, decisions) When (Life CyclesStages, and Internal and External Conditions) ? 31
    • 31. In the Hands of Managers with Different Value Set 32
    • 32. A Continent where in PracticeThere is NO violence against women only deep respectMalnourishment transformed into the peaceful laughter of childrenJobless youth are productive youth contributing to the economic growthCommunities living Ubuntu, modelling humanness to a world slightly gone madPolitical leaders ethically debating the ways to care for the continent, smoothing the way for business to actwith sustained initiative, everyone diligently focusing on the sustainable growth of The Tree of Life, Africa.Transformation as journey into the future, demands management/leadership with a particular ethos and this isa responsibility shared by all members of society. 33

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