Facebook 4 Parents and Educators in my School Community

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A presentation I created to educate our school community about social networking and Facebook. Many of the videos used are not my own; each have proper citation and a direct link to the original source listed.

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Facebook 4 Parents and Educators in my School Community

  1. 1. What is Social Media? Social Networking?Wednesday, May 25, 2011You will find hyperlinks to all videos here, in the presenter’s notes.For a copy of this presentation download at: http://lsurl.me/R6
  2. 2. What is Social Media? Social Networking?Wednesday, May 25, 2011You will find hyperlinks to all videos here, in the presenter’s notes.For a copy of this presentation download at: http://lsurl.me/R6
  3. 3. What is Social Media? Social Networking?Wednesday, May 25, 2011You will find hyperlinks to all videos here, in the presenter’s notes.For a copy of this presentation download at: http://lsurl.me/R6
  4. 4. Facebook for Parents and EducatorsWednesday, May 25, 2011
  5. 5. Facebook for Parents and Educators First things first: You need to know the difference between the LAWs protecting your children online, and the Facebook Terms of Service. They are two different things.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  6. 6. Facebook for Parents and EducatorsWednesday, May 25, 2011
  7. 7. CIPPA: Children’s Internet Protection Act http://transition.fcc.gov/cgb/consumerfacts/cipa.html Click here for moreWednesday, May 25, 2011
  8. 8. HOW TO PROTECT KIDS’ PRIVACY ONLINE ■ Federal Trade Commission ■ A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS http:// W hether offer. Butshopping,comes to their personal information, who’s in charge? The of all that the web has to playing, when it studying or just surfing, today’s kids are taking advantage Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, requires commercial website opera- www.coppa.o tors to get parental consent before collecting any personal information from kids under 13. COPPA allows teachers to act on behalf of a parent during school activities online, but does not require them to do so. That is, the law does not require teachers to make decisions about the collection of their students’ personal rg/coppa.htm information. Check to see whether your school district has a policy about disclosing student information. Children’s Online Here’s a look at the basic provisions of the law and what they mean for you and your students. Privacy and Protection Website Operators Teachers Act MUST get a parent’s consent. May act in place of a parent in deciding whether In many cases, a site must obtain parental consent to give consent. before collecting, using or disclosing personal Consent from a parent authorizes the website to information about a child. Consent is not required collect personal information from your student. when a site is collecting an email address to: Subject to your school district’s policies, you may ◆ respond to a one-time request from a child. act on behalf of the parent in giving consent, but ◆ provide notice to the parent. COPPA does not require you to do so. If you or the parent do not consent to the collection, use or ◆ ensure the safety of the child or the site. disclosure of the student’s personal information, the ◆ send a newsletter or other information on a student’s participation in an online activity may be regular basis as long as the site notifies a limited to areas of the site where personal informa- parent and gives them a chance to say no to tion is not necessary. the arrangement. You can give consent and still say no to having your student’s information passed along to a third party. A parent or teacher’s consent isn’t necessary if the website is collecting a child’s email address simply to respond to a one-time request for information. Must get new consent when information- May decide whether to approve information collection practices change in a “material” way. collection from students based on new uses for Website operators need to notify parents and get the information. consent again if they plan to change the kinds of Website operators will let you know about the need information they collect, change how they use the for new consent by sending you a new notice and information, or offer the information to new and request. They will do this when they are changing different third parties. For example, new consent the terms-of-use of the information in a “material” would be required if the website decides to: or significant way. ◆ send information from children to marketers of diet pills instead of only marketers of stuffed animals, as covered in the original consent. ◆ give a child access to a chat room if the origi- nal consent covered only sending a newsletter.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  9. 9. HOW TO PROTECT KIDS’ PRIVACY ONLINE ■ Federal Trade Commission ■ A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS http:// W hether offer. Butshopping,comes to their personal information, who’s in charge? The of all that the web has to playing, when it studying or just surfing, today’s kids are taking advantage Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, requires commercial website opera- www.coppa.o tors to get parental consent before collecting any personal information from kids under 13. COPPA allows teachers to act on behalf of a parent during school activities online, but does not require them to do so. That is, the law does not require teachers to make decisions about the collection of their students’ personal rg/coppa.htm information. Check to see whether your school district has a policy about disclosing student information. Children’s Online Here’s a look at the basic provisions of the law and what they mean for you and your students. Privacy and Protection Website Operators Teachers Act MUST get a parent’s consent. May act in place of a parent in deciding whether In many cases, a site must obtain parental consent to give consent. before collecting, using or disclosing personal Consent from a parent authorizes the website to information about a child. Consent is not required collect personal information from your student. when a site is collecting an email address to: Subject to your school district’s policies, you may ◆ respond to a one-time request from a child. act on behalf of the parent in giving consent, but ◆ provide notice to the parent. COPPA does not require you to do so. If you or the parent do not consent to the collection, use or ◆ ensure the safety of the child or the site. disclosure of the student’s personal information, the ◆ send a newsletter or other information on a student’s participation in an online activity may be regular basis as long as the site notifies a limited to areas of the site where personal informa- parent and gives them a chance to say no to tion is not necessary. the arrangement. You can give consent and still say no to having your student’s information passed along to a third party. A parent or teacher’s consent isn’t necessary if the website is collecting a child’s email address simply to respond to a one-time request for information. Must get new consent when information- May decide whether to approve information Facebook Terms of Service: collection practices change in a “material” way. collection from students based on new uses for Website operators need to notify parents and get the information. consent again if they plan to change the kinds of Website operators will let you know about the need information they collect, change how they use the for new consent by sending you a new notice and You must be 13 years old to information, or offer the information to new and request. They will do this when they are changing different third parties. For example, new consent the terms-of-use of the information in a “material” would be required if the website decides to: or significant way. ◆ send information from children to marketers of have a Facebook Account. diet pills instead of only marketers of stuffed animals, as covered in the original consent. ◆ give a child access to a chat room if the origi- nal consent covered only sending a newsletter.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  10. 10. HOW TO PROTECT KIDS’ PRIVACY ONLINE ■ Federal Trade Commission ■ A GUIDE FOR TEACHERS http:// W hether offer. Butshopping,comes to their personal information, who’s in charge? The of all that the web has to playing, when it studying or just surfing, today’s kids are taking advantage Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act, enforced by the Federal Trade Commission, requires commercial website opera- www.coppa.o tors to get parental consent before collecting any personal information from kids under 13. COPPA allows teachers to act on behalf of a parent during school activities online, but does not require them to do so. That is, the law does not require teachers to make decisions about the collection of their students’ personal rg/coppa.htm information. Check to see whether your school district has a policy about disclosing student information. Children’s Online Here’s a look at the basic provisions of the law and what they mean for you and your students. Privacy and Protection Website Operators Teachers Act MUST get a parent’s consent. May act in place of a parent in deciding whether In many cases, a site must obtain parental consent to give consent. before collecting, using or disclosing personal Consent from a parent authorizes the website to information about a child. Consent is not required collect personal information from your student. when a site is collecting an email address to: Subject to your school district’s policies, you may ◆ respond to a one-time request from a child. act on behalf of the parent in giving consent, but ◆ provide notice to the parent. COPPA does not require you to do so. If you or the parent do not consent to the collection, use or ◆ ensure the safety of the child or the site. disclosure of the student’s personal information, the ◆ send a newsletter or other information on a student’s participation in an online activity may be regular basis as long as the site notifies a limited to areas of the site where personal informa- parent and gives them a chance to say no to tion is not necessary. the arrangement. You can give consent and still say no to having your student’s information passed along to a third party. A parent or teacher’s consent isn’t necessary if the website is collecting a child’s email address simply to respond to a one-time request for information. Must get new consent when information- May decide whether to approve information collection practices change in a “material” way. collection from students based on new uses for Website operators need to notify parents and get the information. consent again if they plan to change the kinds of Website operators will let you know about the need information they collect, change how they use the for new consent by sending you a new notice and information, or offer the information to new and request. They will do this when they are changing different third parties. For example, new consent the terms-of-use of the information in a “material” would be required if the website decides to: or significant way. ◆ send information from children to marketers of diet pills instead of only marketers of stuffed animals, as covered in the original consent. ◆ give a child access to a chat room if the origi- nal consent covered only sending a newsletter.Wednesday, May 25, 2011
  11. 11. Your Digital Footprint started a long time agoWednesday, May 25, 2011Digital Dossier video here: http://youtu.be/79IYZVYIVLA
  12. 12. Your Digital Footprint started a long time agoWednesday, May 25, 2011Digital Dossier video here: http://youtu.be/79IYZVYIVLA
  13. 13. Your Digital Footprint started a long time agoWednesday, May 25, 2011Digital Dossier video here: http://youtu.be/79IYZVYIVLA
  14. 14. Facebook is not evil; it is not inherently good or bad. It is simply a tool whose content is entirely dependent on the users. Full article here: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/03/being-safe-online-is-being-safe-in-life.htmlWednesday, May 25, 2011An excellent article in Time Magazine about your privacy and Data Mining can be found here:http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2058114,00.html
  15. 15. Facebook is not evil; it is not inherently good or bad. It is simply a tool whose content is entirely dependent on the users. Full article here: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/03/being-safe-online-is-being-safe-in-life.htmlWednesday, May 25, 2011An excellent article in Time Magazine about your privacy and Data Mining can be found here:http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2058114,00.html
  16. 16. Facebook is not evil; it is not inherently good or bad. It is simply a tool whose content is entirely dependent on the users. Full article here: http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/03/being-safe-online-is-being-safe-in-life.htmlWednesday, May 25, 2011An excellent article in Time Magazine about your privacy and Data Mining can be found here:http://www.time.com/time/business/article/0,8599,2058114,00.html
  17. 17. How could this possibly be educational?Wednesday, May 25, 20111) http://jeffthomastech.com/blog/?p=95402) http://theinnovativeeducator.blogspot.com/2011/03/worlds-simplest-social-media-
  18. 18. A Parents’ Guide to Facebook is available to you as a free download to your own computer.Wednesday, May 25, 2011For excellent teacher resources, including the “Facebook for Teachers” pamphlet click here:http://jeffthomastech.com/blog/?p=6887
  19. 19. We teach children how to cross the street; we don’t ban cars.Wednesday, May 25, 2011Keynote Speaker Kevin Honeycutt at: http://www.ihigh.com/kevin/video_895336.html
  20. 20. What Does the Research Say? • http://www.danah.org/ and http:// www.zephoria.org/thoughts/bestof.html • http://www.thatsnotcool.com/ • http://www.edutopia.org/social-media-case- education-edchat-steve-johnson • http://thinkingmachine.pbworks.com/w/page/ 22187719/Think-Social-Media-Guidelines • http://www.delicious.com/vvtechleader/ research_basedWednesday, May 25, 2011
  21. 21. Alternatives and safe “playgrounds” for children under 13 • http://togetherville.com/ • https://www.schoology.com/home.php • http://pbskids.org/itsmylife/ • www.clubpenguin • http://www.webkinz.com/Wednesday, May 25, 2011

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