Science<br />Viashana Smith<br />2-25-10<br />Periodic Table <br />
Introduction To The Periodic Table<br />People have known about elements like carbon and gold since ancient time. The elem...
Periodic Table of Elements <br />Elements in the periodic table are arranged in periods (rows) and groups (columns). Atomi...
Periods<br />Rows of elements are called periods. The period number of an element signifies the highest unexcited energy l...
METALS<br />Some Metals<br />What Are The Metals<br />You see metals every day. Aluminum foil is a metal. Gold and silver ...
Groups<br />Columns of elements help define element groups. Elements within a group share several common properties. Group...
-Group 1: Alkali Metals<br />The alkali metals are located in Group IA (first column) of the periodic table. Sodium and po...
PERIODIC TABLE WITH TRANSISTIONS and alkali metals<br />The transition metals make up the middle block of the periodic tab...
Nonmetals & Metalloids <br />Elements that don't have the properties of metals are called nonmetals. Some elements have so...
What are Properties of Nonmetals?<br />The nonmetals are poor conductors of heat and electricity. Solid nonmetals are brit...
What are the Properties of the Metalloids?<br />Elements that have some properties of metals and some properties of nonmet...
PICTURE OF metalloids and nonmetals<br />The first 36 main group elements are well known materials that can be classified ...
Hydrogen <br />Hydrogen has a single positive charge, like the alkali metals, but at room temperature, it is a gas that do...
Hydrogen {meet the atoms}<br />Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the Galaxy. It is ten times as abundant than heliu...
Atom Facts<br />An atom is made of 200 or more than 200 subatomic particles because it is told that in an atom there is so...
3 types of atoms<br />NEUTRONS-The neutron is a particle found in almost every atomic nucleus (the tiny spec of matter at ...
F I N A L  P R O J E C T 2
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F I N A L P R O J E C T 2

  1. 1. Science<br />Viashana Smith<br />2-25-10<br />Periodic Table <br />
  2. 2. Introduction To The Periodic Table<br />People have known about elements like carbon and gold since ancient time. The elements couldn't be changed using any chemical method. Each element has a unique number of protons. If you examine samples of iron and silver, you can't tell how many protons the atoms have. However, you can tell the elements apart because they have different properties. You might notice there are more similarities between iron and silver than between iron and oxygen.<br />
  3. 3. Periodic Table of Elements <br />Elements in the periodic table are arranged in periods (rows) and groups (columns). Atomic number increases as you move across a row or period. <br />
  4. 4. Periods<br />Rows of elements are called periods. The period number of an element signifies the highest unexcited energy level for an electron in that element. The number of elements in a period increases as you move down the periodic table because there are more sublevels per level as the energy level of the atom increases <br />
  5. 5. METALS<br />Some Metals<br />What Are The Metals<br />You see metals every day. Aluminum foil is a metal. Gold and silver are metals. If someone asks you whether an element is a metal, metalloid, or non-metal and you don't know the answer, guess that it's a metal. <br />Most elements are metals. There are so many metals, they are divided into groups: alkali metals, alkaline earth metals, and transition metals. The transition metals can be divided into smaller groups, such as the lanthanides and actinides. <br />
  6. 6. Groups<br />Columns of elements help define element groups. Elements within a group share several common properties. Groups are elements have the same outer electron arrangement. The outer electrons are called valence electrons. Because they have the same number of valence electrons, elements in a group share similar chemical properties. The Roman numerals listed above each group are the usual number of valence electrons. For example, a group VA element will have 5 valence electrons. <br />
  7. 7. -Group 1: Alkali Metals<br />The alkali metals are located in Group IA (first column) of the periodic table. Sodium and potassium are examples of these elements. Alkali metals form salts and many other compounds. These elements are less dense than other metals, form ions with a +1 charge, and have the largest atom sizes of elements in their periods. The alkali metals are highly reactive. <br />-Group 2: Alkaline Earth Metals<br />The alkaline earths are located in Group IIA (second column) of the periodic table. Calcium and magnesium are examples of alkaline earths. These metals form many compounds. They have ions with a +2 charge. Their atoms are smaller than those of the alkali metals. <br />-Groups 3-12: Transition Metals<br />The transition elements are located in groups IB to VIIIB. Iron and gold are examples of transition metals. These elements are very hard, with high melting points and boiling points. The transition metals are good electrical conductors and are very malleable. They form positively charged ions. <br />
  8. 8. PERIODIC TABLE WITH TRANSISTIONS and alkali metals<br />The transition metals make up the middle block of the periodic table. Like the other elements that are grouped together (alkali metals, noble gases), these metals have very similar properties. Professor Stahl and his research group work with many of the transition metals.<br />
  9. 9. Nonmetals & Metalloids <br />Elements that don't have the properties of metals are called nonmetals. Some elements have some, but not all of the properties of the metals. These elements are called metalloids. <br />
  10. 10. What are Properties of Nonmetals?<br />The nonmetals are poor conductors of heat and electricity. Solid nonmetals are brittle and lack metallic luster. Most nonmetals gain electrons easily. The nonmetals are located on the upper right side of the periodic table, separated from metals by a line that cuts diagonally through the periodic table. The nonmetals can be divided into classes of elements that have similar properties. The halogens and the noble gases are two groups of nonmetals. <br />
  11. 11. What are the Properties of the Metalloids?<br />Elements that have some properties of metals and some properties of nonmetals are called metalloids. Silicon and germanium are examples of metalloids. The boiling points, melting points, and densities of the metalloids vary. The metalloids make good semiconductors. The metalloids are located along the diagonal line between the metals and nonmetals in the periodic table. <br />
  12. 12. PICTURE OF metalloids and nonmetals<br />The first 36 main group elements are well known materials that can be classified as: metals, metalloids and non-metals: <br />
  13. 13. Hydrogen <br />Hydrogen has a single positive charge, like the alkali metals, but at room temperature, it is a gas that doesn't act like a metal. Therefore, hydrogen usually is labeled as a nonmetal. <br />
  14. 14. Hydrogen {meet the atoms}<br />Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the Galaxy. It is ten times as abundant than helium, which is the second most widely occurring element. On Earth it only makes up about 0.14 percent of the solid crust but is very very abundant in water molecules; oceans, ice packs, rivers, lakes, and water vapor inn the atmosphere. The amount of hydrogen in the Earth's atmosphere remains low because it is so light that it continually escapes into space<br />
  15. 15. Atom Facts<br />An atom is made of 200 or more than 200 subatomic particles because it is told that in an atom there is so much space and electrons take only 1/1000th volume of it so there left very much space. That space may have more subatomic particles in it and according to the calculations there may come more than 200 subatomic particles.<br />
  16. 16. 3 types of atoms<br />NEUTRONS-The neutron is a particle found in almost every atomic nucleus (the tiny spec of matter at the heart of an atom). Only the hydrogen nucleus has no neutron. All other atoms have one or more.<br />PROTRONS-The proton is a subatomic particle with an electric charge of +1 elementary charge. It is found in the nucleus of each atom, along with neutrons, but is also stable by itself and has a second identity as the hydrogen ion, H+. <br />ELECTRONS-The electron is a subatomic particle that carries a negative electric charge. It has no known components or substructure, and therefore is believed to be an elementary particle.<br />

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