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Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
Potentially Dangerous apps!
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Potentially Dangerous apps!

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Helping parents keep up with the latest "apps" that children are downloading. Gives parents the information they need to decide if their child can use the app responsibly, or if it needs to be …

Helping parents keep up with the latest "apps" that children are downloading. Gives parents the information they need to decide if their child can use the app responsibly, or if it needs to be deleted from their devices.

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  • 1. Potentially Dangerous Apps! Keeping up with the latest popular sites!
  • 2. KiK •A free texting app available for iPhones, Android, Windows, and Blackberry phones. •This app can also be downloaded onto an iPod or iPad. •Users can talk to multiple people, upload pictures and files. •Dangers: Teens are using this app to send and receive nude pictures. If your child’s KiK profile is public (available for anyone to see), random strangers can contact your child and send them inappropriate text and pictures as well. This site can also be used to bully fellow students.
  • 3. SnapChat •Mobile messaging app that destroys photo’s and text messages within 10 seconds of them being opened. •Often referred to as the “safe sexting app”. •User sets the amount of time the recipient can view their photo (range of 1-10 seconds) before it self-destructs. •Dangers: Youth think the pictures they are sending are gone for good. But people can still grab screenshots of your photo. You will be alerted the recipient has made a copy, but you can’t retrieve your photo.
  • 4. Yik Yak •Yik Yak is an anonymous social media site. •it allows people to anonymously create and view posts within a 1.5 mile radius depending on how many other users are nearby •All users have the ability to contribute to the stream by writing, responding, and up voting or down voting yaks. •It is intended for adults 18 and older Dangers: Students under 18 are using the site. And because it is anonymous, it has become a place students can cyber-bully and harass.
  • 5. Instagram •An online photo-sharing and social networking service that enables its users to take pictures and videos and share them on a variety of social networking services, such as Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Flickr. •Dangers: Users can post a malicious photo of a target for all to see. It is possible to caption an insulting picture with a target’s username or post cruel comments under a photo. Users can add hurtful hashtags under a photo such as #ugly #tryweightwatchers #loser #unloveable
  • 6. ask.fm •Is a controversial Q & A service. •Users create a profile page and other users post questions to them anonymously or with their name. •Questions that have been recently answered are visible on the user’s profile. •Dangers: It is unmoderated, has no parental controls, and is an overseas based company (Latvia). Terms of service state that all disputes will be settled under Latvian Law. This site has become a place for cruel and sexually explicit questions. Several US suicides have been linked to bullying from this site.
  • 7. MeetMe •Social networking site that connects people to chat and meet. •When you log on, it lists people who are online. It uses GPS to show who’s nearby and how far away they are. •Dangers: Shows your child’s location to potential predators. Many of the profile pictures are provocative. Younger children can easily fake their age and talk to older site members.
  • 8. •Vine allows you to share six Vine second looping videos. •Meant to give people a snapshot into your day, or a place to post funny videos. •Dangers: Pornographic or inappropriate videos are being shared and are easily accessible.
  • 9. In the News…. Read Article About Florida Girl's Suicide Linked to Social Networking Site “I posted a picture of myself on Instagram and people started commenting these awful things like “Eww ur so ugly” “Why don’t you go kill urslef everyone would be happier that way” And I KNOW these people…they go to my school. I cried for a good 2 hours. I’m never going on Instagram again. I wish I could disappear so I don’t I have to go to school.” ~ 12 year-old girl from Colorado Read Amanda Todd's Story
  • 10. What Can Parents Do?  Check Your Child’s Devices Frequently  Stay Up To Date  Continue to check back to Slideshare for future presentations.  Parental Controls  Learn how to use the Parental Control on your child’s phone.  Click Here for iPhone Parental Control Instructions  Click Here for Droid Parental Control Instructions  Helpful Websites  Your Sphere: Helping Families Live Healthy Digital Lives  Cyberbullying
  • 11. Megan Crouch, VFC Director Amy Holbrook, VFC Prevention Education Coordinator Pat Clark, VFC Prevention Education Specialist Ohio Department of Health Ohio Domestic Violence Network Ohio Alliance to End Sexual Violence Find us at: www.arcshelter.org www.facebook.com/ViolenceFreeCoalition “This publication/material was supported by the 5VF1CE001114-3 from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessary represent the official views of the Center for Disease Control and Prevention”

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