The Business of Creativity

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Michael Chapman, SVP Group Planning Director at The Martin Agency, gave this presentation at "Ambidexterity," the VCU Brandcenter's executive education program for account planning on July 16th, 2013 at the VCU Brandcenter in Richmond.

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The Business of Creativity

  1. 1. The Business Of Creativity Wednesday, July 31, 13
  2. 2. What makes a good planner? Wednesday, July 31, 13
  3. 3. VS. Business Analysis Efficient Comprehensive Creativity Imaginative Impactful Single-minded Conflicting imperatives. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  4. 4. Business Analysis Efficient Comprehensive Creativity Imaginative Impactful Single-minded + Conflicting imperatives. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  5. 5. Stupid people think complex things are clever. David Trott Wednesday, July 31, 13
  6. 6. 1. The CMO isn’t looking for more ads Wednesday, July 31, 13
  7. 7. 70% 72% 73%77% frustrated that brand metrics aren’t linking back to revenue and sales say marketing teams don’t understand ROI Source: 2011 Global Marketing Effectiveness Program, Fournaise Group ROI focused CEOs question marketing’s effectiveness say they are bombarded with marketing data that hardly relates to P & L say marketing can’t explain how much incremental revenue additional marketing investment will generate Wednesday, July 31, 13
  8. 8. ! A Perfect Storm Channel Proliferation Audience Fragmentation Ad Avoidance Importance of Word-of- Mouth Blinding Clutter Intense Accountability ADVERTISERS Pressure on ROI Waining AD Influence Wednesday, July 31, 13
  9. 9. "WITH MORE COUNTRIES, MORE CUSTOMER SEGMENTATION, MORE MEDIA, AND MORE DISTRIBUTION CHANNELS, COMPANIES AND THEIR CMO'S ARE WAGING A BATTLE WITH COMPLEXITY" McKinsey Quarterly IBM CMO Study 2012 The Overarching Problem: Complexity Wednesday, July 31, 13
  10. 10. Source: Global Chief Marketing Officer Study, IBM, 2011 Percent of CMOs reporting unpreparedness CMOs are overwhelmed by enormity of the effort. Data Explosion Social Media Growth of channel and device choices Shifting consumer demographics Financial constraints Decreasing brand loyalty Growth market opportunities ROI accountability Customer collaboration and influence Privacy considerations Global outsourcing Regulatory considerations Corporate transparency 0% 25% 50% 75% 100% 47% 50% 54% 55% 56% 56% 56% 57% 59% 63% 65% 68% 71% Wednesday, July 31, 13
  11. 11. They are looking for outside help. IBM CMO Study 2012 Wednesday, July 31, 13
  12. 12. “Alarmingly, clients have a vastly low lowered expectation of agencies. Only 41 % have a positive view of the quality of agency people” Avi Dan, Forbes Wednesday, July 31, 13
  13. 13. “We Make Brands Famous” “Innovative Solutions” “Brand Truths into Business Transformations” “Populist Creativity” (creating enduring, popular ideas that solves a business problem) “The Work, The Work, The Work” “Art Serving Capitalism” “Big Ideas” (make brands famous) “ (We) exist to serve clients, build brands, and grow businesses.”  most of us are just talking in the same old ways... Wednesday, July 31, 13
  14. 14. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  15. 15. 2. Creative demands new planning capabilities Wednesday, July 31, 13
  16. 16. What’s your favorite creative out there? Wednesday, July 31, 13
  17. 17. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  18. 18. Revolutionizing the role of advertising Storytelling Storybuilding From: To: Beginning, middle & end Linear Monologue Closed Beginning...and no end Organic Dialogue Open Wednesday, July 31, 13
  19. 19. A new approach Storybuilding means a never-ending story Business Potential Story Architecture Identify the best opportunity for dramatic growth Create a participatory, living brand experience Wednesday, July 31, 13
  20. 20. Brand Where/ How Saying DoingExperience Engagement An evolution of planning. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  21. 21. Storybuilding Brand Building Business Building But it is just a means to an end. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  22. 22. Ambidexterity? 1. The CMO isn’t looking for more ads 2. Creative demands new planning capabilities Wednesday, July 31, 13
  23. 23. Yesterday" Tomorrow" Marketing/Business Solutions Market Analysis C-Suite Inside Out Tangible brand Experiences Advertising Ideas Brand Research CMO Outside In Intangible brand promises Ambidexterity Wednesday, July 31, 13
  24. 24. Requires upfront spending and a longer term commitment Requires Proof of Concept and/or projectable results Breaks down silos and effects more people in the organization Is dependent on clear and measurable KPIs Tangible brand ExperiencesIntangible brand promises Ambidexterity Wednesday, July 31, 13
  25. 25. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  26. 26. #$ The Intangible Brand Promise Wednesday, July 31, 13
  27. 27. #% Wednesday, July 31, 13
  28. 28. #& What’s the tangible brand experience? Wednesday, July 31, 13
  29. 29. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  30. 30. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  31. 31. !' The Intangible Brand Promise Wednesday, July 31, 13
  32. 32. NCL Wednesday, July 31, 13
  33. 33. !! What’s the tangible brand experience? Wednesday, July 31, 13
  34. 34. Not Produced Wednesday, July 31, 13
  35. 35. Freestyle Chart Not Produced Wednesday, July 31, 13
  36. 36. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  37. 37. !% What’s the tangible brand experience? Wednesday, July 31, 13
  38. 38. The Mission $186 MM Wednesday, July 31, 13
  39. 39. Current Expertise Added Capability Brand Transformation Creative Thinking Deep Brand and Analytics Capabilities Business Transformation Financial Prowess Deep Business and Financial Analysis Capabilities The Partnership Wednesday, July 31, 13
  40. 40. The Intangible Brand Promise Wednesday, July 31, 13
  41. 41. March 2011 Wednesday, July 31, 13
  42. 42. March 2011 Wednesday, July 31, 13
  43. 43. STEEL AND STEAM DID NOT BUILD THE INDUSTRIAL AGE. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. SILICON AND CIRCUITS DID NOT LINK THE INFORMATION AGE. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. EVERY INNOVATION. EVERY ACHIEVEMENT. EVERY BREAKTHROUGH IS ONLY POSSIBLE BECAUSE IT’S HUMANLY POSSIBLE. Ideas are manufactured only by the imagination and the determination of people. And only the businesses that recognize this are the ones who will succeed. Our mission is to help organizations across the globe achieve more than they ever thought possible. From workforce assessment, recruiting and training, to career management and talent based outsourcing, our Innovative Workforce Solutions let businesses reach their fullest potential by reawakening them to the very real power of people. We are ManpowerGroup™. manpowergroup.com STEEL AND STEAM DID NOT BUILD THE INDUSTRIAL AGE. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. ROCKETS AND ALGORITHMS DID NOT LAUNCH THE SPACE AGE. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. SILICON AND CIRCUITS DID NOT LINK THE INFORMATION AGE. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. EVERY INNOVATION. EVERY ACHIEVEMENT. EVERY BREAKTHROUGH IS ONLY POSSIBLE BECAUSE IT’S HUMANLY POSSIBLE.Ideas are manufactured only by the imagination and the determination of people. And only the businesses that recognize this are the ones who will succeed. Our mission is to help organizations across the globe achieve more than they ever thought possible. From workforce assessment, recruiting and training, to career management and talent based outsourcing, our Innovative Workforce Solutions let businesses reach their fullest potential by reawakening them to the very real power of people. We are ManpowerGroup. manpowergroup.com Experis™ / Manpower® / Right Management® The Wall Street Journal: Four consecutive right-hand page spectacular ran in U.S. and global issues. Humanly Possible March 2011 Wednesday, July 31, 13
  44. 44. you. Trust comes from deliver- ing every day on what you prom- ise—as a manager, an employee and a company. It involves con- stant teamwork, communication and collaboration. Research shows that the most-trusted companies have lower employee turnover, higher revenue, profitability and share- holder returns. It only makes sense. What employee, customer or investor would choose to do business with a low-trust part- ner when a high-trust option is right around the corner? If trust is crucial to restarting our economy, perhaps it is time we started helping leaders un- derstand what trust is, how to build it and how to sustain it. Trust is usually given to those who demonstrate trustworthi- ness. What follows are five prin- ciples leaders can adopt to dem- onstrate trustworthiness and embed it in their companies. High-trust leaders try to accom- plish their goals by serving the interests of all stakeholders, not by serving some while giving short shrift to, or manipulating, others. Leaders must clarify and align stakeholder interests, and prove they will promote those interests in a fair manner. 2. Demonstrate concern for others People trust those who care about the welfare of others and distrust those who seem con- cerned only about themselves. To earn trust, leaders must dem- onstrate to others that they will do the right thing for them even if it puts themselves at risk. One chief executive chose to tell a vice president of marketing that he was being laid off just when competent. Data suggest this is the primary reason so few peo- ple trust the U.S. government to- day. They see the government as wasteful and dysfunctional and therefore not trustworthy. If leaders want to earn trust, they must prove they can reliably de- liver on their commitments. This is sometimes the down- fall of visionary leaders. I am re- minded of the leader of a con- sulting firm who was enamored of his brilliant vision but failed to realize that vision without ex- ecution often looks like delusion. People liked him, but they didn’t trust him because he didn’t exe- cute on his lofty ideas. High- trust leaders make sure that there is a reasonable probability and capability to deliver before they make promises. 4. Be consistent and honest High-trust leaders tend to feature consistency and integrity in their behavior. High-trust managers always try to honor their word and, if they fail to do so, they apologize and make sure it does not become a habit. When Warren Buffet was embar- rassed by revelations that his right-hand man, David Sokol, had an undisclosed conflict of interest ($10 million in stock he held personally) in a major deal, he did not hide behind lawyers or say “no comment.” He admit- ted the mistake and put mea- sures in place to ensure that it would not happen again. Most people know that perfection can only be an aspiration. Trust comes from always striving al- ways to honor ones word. 5. Communicate frequently, clearly and openly Because trust is largely about relationships, communication is critical. Communication is also the vehicle through which the other four elements of trustwor- thiness are delivered. The ability to align interests, demonstrate benevolence, accurately commu- nicate one’s capabilities and practice what you preach all re- quire effective communication skills. Spirals of distrust often begin with miscommunication, leading to perceived betrayal, causing further impoverishment of com- munication, and ending in a state of chronic distrust. Clear and transparent communication encourages the same from oth- ers and leads to confidence in a relationship. i i i Restoring trust will require more than ethics training. It will require leaders and organiza- tions that earn trust by striving to manifest trustworthiness in word and deed. Dr. Hurley is a professor at Fordham University and author of the book “The Decision to Trust: How Leaders Can Create High Trust Companies.” He can be reached at reports@wsj.com.. the stage for even their most skilled people to fail. It’s crucial for leaders to screen out bad apples before they’re hired—and if they do slip through the cracks, bosses must make every effort to reform or (if necessary) oust them. Spreading the Vibes It’s easy to understand why bosses would rather focus on at- tracting and developing super- stars. A mountain of research shows that stars and geniuses can deliver astounding results. And, obviously, it’s more fun and inspiring to focus on top-per- forming, energetic employees. But studies of everything from romantic relationships to work- place encounters show that neg- ative interactions can pack a much bigger wallop than positive ones. The reason is simple: “Bad is stronger than good,” as psy- chologist Roy Baumeister and his colleagues put it. The negative thoughts, feelings and perform- ance they trigger in others are far larger and longer lasting than the positive responses generated by more constructive colleagues. Consider research on bad ap- ples and team effectiveness by Will Felps, Terence R. Mitchell and Eliza Byington. They exam- ined the impact of team mem- bers who were deadbeats (“with- holders of effort”), downers (who “express pessimism, anxi- ety, insecurity and irritation”) and jerks (who violate “interper- sonal norms of respect”). An ex- periment by Mr. Felps found that having just one slacker or jerk in a group can bring down perform- ance by 30% to 40%. How can organizations squash those negative influences? The easiest way, obviously, is to avoid hiring bad apples in the first place—and that means tak- ing a different approach to as- sessing candidates for jobs. The usual means of screening are often weak when it comes to determining if a job candidate is a bad apple. Candidates may have gone to the best schools or may come across as charming and brilliant in interviews—thus disguising their laziness, incom- petence or nastiness. That’s why one of the best ways to screen employees is to see how they actually do the job under realistic conditions. Ak- shay Kothari and Ankit Gupta fa- vor that approach. When they’re hiring new people for their Palo Alto, Calif., company, Pulse, which makes a news-reading app for mobile devices, they consider evaluations from peers and supe- riors and do multiple rounds of interviews. But they say the most effective thing is to bring candi- dates in for a day or two and give them a short job to accom- plish. (The candidates are paid for their time.) Not only do they learn a lot about the candidates’ technical skills, Messrs. Kothari and Gupta say, but they also learn about their personality. How do they deal with setbacks? Do they know when to ask for help and to give others help? Is the candi- date the kind of person they want to work with? The partners say there have been several can- didates who looked great on pa- more colorful word than “jerk”). The company starts sending the message during the hiring process, says CEO Paul Purcell. “During the interview, I look them in the eye and tell them, ‘If I discover that you are a jerk, I am going to fire you,’ ” he says. “Most candidates aren’t fazed by this, but every now and then, one turns pale, and we never see them again—they find some rea- son to back out of the search.” When the company makes a hiring error and brings aboard an employee who persistently demeans colleagues or puts per- sonal needs ahead of others, Baird acts quickly to deal with or expel the bad apple. Mr. Purcell’s crusty approach won’t work in every company culture. For an idea of how to handle the task with a more sub- tle hand, look at renowned chef Alice Waters, who has headed the restaurant Chez Panisse in Berkeley, Calif., for 40 years now. Biographer Thomas McNamee describes how Ms. Waters’s love of people and food has spread to those around her. Along the way, though, many bad apples have been shown the door—but Ms. Waters doesn’t hold it open. The process usually starts when one of her colleagues conveys the message that Ms. Waters isn’t “entirely pleased.” If the hints don’t work, then that colleague— curb the toxic employee’s behav- ior. Another tactic is to physi- cally isolate the bad apple. In one organization, there was a deeply skilled and incredibly nasty engineer whom leaders could not bring themselves to fire. So, they rented a beautiful private office for him several blocks from the building where his colleagues worked. His co- workers were a lot happier—and so was he, since he preferred working alone. But beware: Leaders who be- lieve that destructive superstars are “too important” to fire often underestimate the damage they can do. Stanford researchers Charles O’Reilly and Jeffrey Pfef- fer report a revealing episode at a clothing retailer. The company fired a top-producing salesman who was a bad apple. After he was gone, none of his former col- leagues sold as much as he had. But the store’s total sales shot up by nearly 30%. The lesson, ac- cording to the researchers: “That one individual brought the oth- ers down, and when he was gone, they could do their best.” Mr. Sutton, a professor of manage- ment science and engineering at Stanford University, is the author of “Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best…and Learn from the Worst.” He can be reached at reports@wsj.com. RossMacDonald Sources: Roy F. Baumeister, Florida State University, et al.; Andrew Miner, University of Minnesota, et al.; Teresa Amabile and Steven Kramer, “The Progress Principle” u Employees who tracked their moods after encounters with peers and superiors reported far more positive than negative interactions. But the negative interactions had five times as much impact on their moods as the positive interactions. u In romantic relationships and marriages, if positive interactions don’t outnumber negative interac- tions by at least 5 to 1, odds are that the relationship will fail. u Work teams whose leaders engaged in such behavior as persistent rudeness, arrogance, micromanagement and indecisive- ness made less daily progress, did less creative work and were ultimately less successful than teams with persistently positive leaders. Employees recalled lead- ers’ negative actions more readily, more intensely and in more detail than positive actions. The ‘Bad Is Stronger Than Good’ Effect These studies on boorish behavior and its impact show why companies shouldn’t tolerate it SergeBloch Source: Harris Interactive 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 5 10 15 20 25 30% Trust comes from delivering every day on what you promise— as a manager, as an employee and as a company © 2011 ManpowerGroup. All rights reserved. TEACHING A MAN NOT TO FISH IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE What can fishermen do when they can no longer fish? After a tsunami destroyed the fishing industry in Tamil Nadu, residents needed new careers. ManpowerGroup™ created vocational training centers dedicated to transforming the workforce. Today, many graduates are earning seven times more as graphic designers. Find the hidden talent in people and you’ll find a sea of possibilities. Discover more at manpowergroup.com ManpowerGroup™ Solutions | Experis™ | Manpower ® | Right Management ® Wednesday, July 31, 13
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  46. 46. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  47. 47. GROWTH Experis believes that the world of work needs to be looked at through a new lens, where people are at the core of success. Installation pieces were created as a physical manifestation of that belief and placed in high traf- fic areas at the Milwaukee corporate headquarters. Here an ordinary seat becomes a seedling of business growth. PERFECT MATCH Experis believes that the world of work needs to be looked at through a new lens, where people are at the core of success. Installation pieces were created as a physical manifestation of that belief and placed in high traf- fic areas at the Milwaukee corporate headquarters. Here traditional office lighting becomes an expression of human passion. CRUSHING CUBES Experis believes that the world of work needs to be looked at through a new lens, where people are at the core of success. Installation pieces were created as a physical manifestation of that belief and placed in high traffic areas at the Milwaukee corporate headquarters. Here the traditional office has been crushed and readied for disposal. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  48. 48. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  49. 49. Netherlands Wednesday, July 31, 13
  50. 50. It’s your time to shine. Thousands of job opportunities are out there. Manpower® will help you achieve your potential. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com SAHARSAHAR ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. HAS BEGUN THE AGE OF The next big thing is you. Manpower® won’t just find you a better job, we’ll find you a brighter future. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com ABASI ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. HAS BEGUN THE AGE OF LOOK BEYOND THE CARPENTER. The contingent and permanent staffing solutions from Manpower® help you succeed by matching the right people with the right mix of skills and experience to your business. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. SEE OPPORTUNITY. ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. LOOK BEYOND THE BANK TELLER. No matter what your business needs, Manpower® can provide you with intelligent, passionate, reliable people to help your business grow like never before. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com SEE OPPORTUNITY. ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. LOOK BEYOND THE DESIGN ENGINEER. Manpower® will work closely with you to meet the demands for productivity, innovation and most of all, talent. Uncovering opportunities you may never have seen. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com SEE OPPORTUNITY. Manpower® helps thousands of people find great new jobs every day. It’s your turn. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com ABBYABBY ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. HAS BEGUN THE AGE OF There’s nothing more uplifting than the first day at your dream job. Manpower® can help you experience that feeling for yourself. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com ZHENGHAS BEGUN THE AGE OF FINDING HIDDEN TALENT ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE With thousands of expert recruiting professionals in over 80 countries and territories, we are the global leader in Recruitment Process Outsourcing. We can efficiently pinpoint the best and brightest candidates anywhere you want to go. Get started at manpowergroupsolutions.com Recruitment Process Outsourcing The world of work has changed. Today, it’s not about technology or infrastructure. It’s about people and their passion to do the impossible on a regular basis. Companies that understand this will be the ones to succeed. ManpowerGroup™ Solutions offers integrated, talent-based strategies to help you achieve real change. See what happens when you unleash the very real power of people. Go to manpowergroupsolutions.com UNLOCKING LIMITLESS POTENTIAL IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE Today it’s not technology, infrastructure or even capital that blasts you ahead of your competition. It’s people. Passion and ambition unleashed on old problems create powerful new ideas. Let us find the right people for you. Then stand back. Discover more at manpowergroupsolutions.com UNLOCKING HUMAN POTENTIAL IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE ©2012ManpowerGroup. Allrightsreserved. Borderless Talent Solutions Managed Service Provider Recruitment Process Outsourcing Strategic Workforce Consulting Talent Based Outsourcing Companies run on the power of their people. Enlist our industry-leading Recruitment Process Outsourcing solutions and work with our expert global recruiting professionals to find the best talent. Our innovative recruitment solutions connect you with the capabilities and passion of people to help you achieve more. Find out more at manpowergroupsolutions.com HARNESSING ENDLESS ENERGY IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE Recruitment Process Outsourcing CONNECTING PASSION TO PURPOSE IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE ©2012ManpowerGroup. Allrightsreserved. Strategic Workforce Consulting Today, it’s talent that separates you from your competition. Passion and determination close the gap between what you want to do and what you actually achieve. Our Strategic Workforce Consulting develops impactful and flexible workforce strategies that match your vision, bringing your business to life. See how we can take your company places you never thought possible. Learn more at manpowergroupsolutions.com REVERSING CONTINENTAL DRIFT IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE Oceans, borders and lines on the map are no longer barriers to doing amazing things. That’s because today’s workforce is more mobile than ever. Skill-rich regions regularly feed areas with talent shortages. So no matter where you do business, Borderless Talent Solutions can help you find the most qualified people anywhere in the world and assimilate them quickly and efficiently into your organization. See how at manpowergroupsolutions.com Borderless Talent Solutions ©2012ManpowerGroup. Allrightsreserved. REACHING NEW HEIGHTS IS HUMANLY POSSIBLE How can a growing business develop totally new capabilities overnight? With ManpowerGroup Solutions Talent Based Outsourcing. We’ll recruit and manage support teams to handle tasks like call centers and IT help desks. The result is lower costs, more focus on core business. Find out more at manpowergroupsolutions.com. Talent Based Outsourcing LOOK BEYOND THE TRUCK DRIVER. Manpower® delves deeply into each assignment, getting to know your company and its business objectives. Because, ultimately, your success is our success. See what’s humanly possible at manpower.com ©2011ManpowerGroup.Allrightsreserved. SEE OPPORTUNITY. Wednesday, July 31, 13
  51. 51. Questions? Wednesday, July 31, 13

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