Resilience of crested wheatgrass stands: implications for rangeland seedings and structural diversity by Tom Monaco, ARS Forage and Range Research Lab
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Resilience of crested wheatgrass stands: implications for rangeland seedings and structural diversity by Tom Monaco, ARS Forage and Range Research Lab

on

  • 170 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
170
Views on SlideShare
170
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Resilience of crested wheatgrass stands: implications for rangeland seedings and structural diversity by Tom Monaco, ARS Forage and Range Research Lab Resilience of crested wheatgrass stands: implications for rangeland seedings and structural diversity by Tom Monaco, ARS Forage and Range Research Lab Presentation Transcript

    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY PLANTS FOR THE WEST THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Utah State University, Logan, Utah Resilience  of  crested   wheatgrass  stands  :   implica5ons  for   rangeland  seedings  and   structural  diversity   Thomas  Monaco,  Ecologist  
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Presentation Outline PLANTS FOR THE WEST 1. Background: What novel changes have occurred to upland and semiarid shrub ecosystems in the Great Basin? 2. Case Study: Characteristics of shrublands historically seeded with crested wheatgrass. 3. Five-Year Field Experiment: Can crested wheatgrass stands be modified to favor greater diversity? Disturbance and reintroduction of species
    • Photo courtesy of Utah State Historical Society Novel changes to Great Basin shrublands
    • 1953 Novel changes to Great Basin ecosystems: 2011 Photos courtesy of Salt Lake BLM and Google Earth Photos courtesy of Justin Williams
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Early days of remediation: more novel changes imposed PLANTS FOR THE WEST Photo courtesy of Utah State Historical Society Hull and Stewart (1948) Replacing cheatgrass by reseeding with perennial grass on southern Idaho ranges J. Amer. Soc. Agron. 40:694-703.
    • Seeding extensive abandoned dry farms in Southern Idaho Shrub removal, later followed by seeding, associated with the Halogeton Act 1952-1953 Railing sagebrush – broadcast seeding 1940s Entire valley successfully seeded with crested wheatgrass in 1940s Photos courtesy of Utah State Historical Society
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Ecological processes PLANTS FOR THE WEST Seed limitation vs. competitive exclusion (Gunnell, Monaco et al. 2010) Competition Grazing/herbivory (Leonard, Monaco et al. 2008; Rayburn and Monaco 2011) Stand establishment (Monaco et al. 2012)
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY How site history impacts impacts succession PLANTS FOR THE WEST (Morris, Monaco et al. in press)
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY How site history impacts impacts succession PLANTS FOR THE WEST (Morris, Monaco et al. in press)
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Ecological site–based analysis PLANTS FOR THE WEST •  38 sagebrush sites •  3 MLRA (Major land Resource Areas) –  Snake River Plains (11) –  Owyhee High Plateau (25) –  Great Salt Lake Area (28) •  11 25 15 different Ecological sites 28
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Ecological site–based analysis PLANTS FOR THE WEST •  Community  composi-on  by  percent  cover   MLRA  11                MLRA  25            MLRA  28  
    • Vegetation characteristics
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Crested wheatgrass resilience PLANTS FOR THE WEST …suppression treatments were not effective and therefore did not improve restoration of native species in crested wheatgrass stands. Native species establishment may require subsequent management to favor persistence of native species and retard crested wheatgrass. (Fansler and Mangold 2011). … crested wheatgrass recovered to similar cover percentages as untreated plots 2–3 yr after wheatgrassreduction treatments. Effective wheatgrass control may require secondary treatments to reduce the seed bank and open stands to dominance by seeded native species (Hulet et al. 2010).
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Research Design/methods PLANTS FOR THE WEST Two sites in southern Idaho - duplicated in 2009 and 2010 Pre-treatment: 1 or 2 year - Mowing to prevent seed dispersal - Herbicide (glyphosate) to kill plants Seeding: grasses, forbs, shrubs
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Research Design/methods PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Seeding (Fall 2009 and 2010) PLANTS FOR THE WEST Seeded species Bluebunch wheatgrass Squirreltail Yarrow Globemallow Sagebrush Rabbitbrush Shadscale
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Results PLANTS FOR THE WEST
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Conclusions PLANTS FOR THE WEST 1. Reducing seed dispersal was critical to reduce crested wheatgrass recovery 2. Herbicide applications improved seedling emergence and establishment 3. Due to mortality of seeded species over time, it may be necessary to seed again
    • THE FORAGE AND RANGE RESEARCH LABORATORY Thanks to collaborators PLANTS FOR THE WEST Black Pine Ranches (Lane Schumann) Justin Williams, Sarahi Felix, Merilynn Hirsch Kevin Gunnell, Christo Morris, Jamin Johanson