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2011 Ontology Summit Communique: Making the Case for Ontology <br />Talk by: Michael Uschold<br />Content by: Ontolog Comm...
Background<br />This talk is a companion to the Joint Communiqueof the Ontology Summit 2011, the sixth annual series of ev...
Brief History of “O”<br />A solution looking for a problem.<br />‘O’ community searched and searched(80s & 90s)<br />Build...
For a dozen years, still searching   for commercial impact.<br />Main output:<br />Long lists of potential benefits<br />L...
Then Everything Changed (circa 2000)<br />Explosion of commercial interest and  deployments began as a trickle around  200...
Recent Trends<br />Semantic Technology Conf. grows through recession<br />Semantic Technology Companies / Consultancies<br...
Today<br />Large numbers of deployed ontologies (100? 1000s?)<br />Dramatic increase in recent years<br />Technology is ma...
Target Audience <br />First: Ontology Technology Evangelists(you know who you are).<br />Second:  Semantic Technology Evan...
Four Guidelines<br />Know who to target<br />Establish Relevance<br />Generate Excitement,Instill Confidence<br />Communic...
  Has problems that    ontology can solve
  Value, not technology
  Relate to audience situation
Show how and why ontology                 adds value
Relevant success stories
  Cite market trends & activity
  Be realistic.
 Concrete, not abstract
 1 liners and Elevator Speeches
 Tailor to audience</li></li></ul><li>Building a Foundation for Making the Case<br />HERE and NOW:<br />Examples of Ontolo...
Applications and Case Studies<br />Where and How are ontologies already being applied and delivering value?<br />Just abou...
Applications and Case Studies<br />More Examples:<br />Improved monitoring and maintenance in manufacturing  <br />Manage ...
Ontology Usage Framework <br />GOALS<br />To better understand and classify ontology uses<br />A common way to compare and...
Ontology Usage Framework <br />
Where is the value?<br />Five broad categories:<br />IT Efficiency <br />Operational Efficiency <br />Business Agility<br ...
Agility / Flexibility
Interoperability / Integration
Customer Satisfaction</li></ul>How to tell the story of value?<br />(hint: first GET the story!)<br />
Story of Value    (1/4)<br />Manufacturing Quality Assurance<br />Defective Widgets:<br />1 in a 1000 widgets coming of th...
Story of Value  (2/4)<br />Manufacturing Quality Assurance<br />SOLUTION: <br />Build ontologies for various aspects of bu...
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Making the Case for Ontology

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This talk is a companion to the Joint Communique (http://ontolog.cim3.net/cgi-bin/wiki.pl?OntologySummit2011_Communique) of the Ontology Summit 2011, the sixth annual series of events in which the international ontology community explores a given topic over a series of online meetings culminating in a face-to-face symposium held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

The goal of the 2011 Ontology Summit is to assist in making the case for the use of ontology by providing concrete application examples, success/value metrics and advocacy strategies. This communique provides tips, guidelines, and strategies for making the case for ontology to a variety of potential beneficiaries and future stakeholders.

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  • Animation, Represent issues with icons, e.g. reliabilty is thumbs up, agility is a runner, self-describing data is number or word with graph on sleeve…Issues pop up then are connected by causal paths with links meaning ‘facilitates’ or ‘inhibits’ E.g. Invisible semantics inhibits understandabtility which inhibits ease of maintenance which inhibits flexibilty and agility. Self-describing data facilitates understandabilty. Easier to reuse facilitates fast evolution and agility. Automated reasoning facilitates consistency and reliability.Root of most problems are:Invisible Semantics Data SilosInformation and Complexity OverloadThese all have ripple effects on:Maintenance costs, Reuse, understandabiltiy, speed of evolution, agility, costs, reliability, consistency, Interoperability / Integration ‘We add three things that collectively address most of these problems1. self describing data – adding meaning 2. Easier data connections – Linked Data (overcome silos)3. Automated reasoning – to address complexity, reliability and add new capabilities
  • Animation, Represent issues with icons, e.g. reliabilty is thumbs up, agility is a runner, self-describing data is number or word with graph on sleeve…Issues pop up then are connected by causal paths with links meaning ‘facilitates’ or ‘inhibits’ E.g. Invisible semantics inhibits understandabtility which inhibits ease of maintenance which inhibits flexibilty and agility. Self-describing data facilitates understandabilty. Easier to reuse facilitates fast evolution and agility. Automated reasoning facilitates consistency and reliability.Root of most problems are:Invisible Semantics Data SilosInformation and Complexity OverloadThese all have ripple effects on:Maintenance costs, Reuse, understandabiltiy, speed of evolution, agility, costs, reliability, consistency, Interoperability / Integration ‘We add three things that collectively address most of these problems1. self describing data – adding meaning 2. Easier data connections – Linked Data (overcome silos)3. Automated reasoning – to address complexity, reliability and add new capabilities
  • Animation, Represent issues with icons, e.g. reliabilty is thumbs up, agility is a runner, self-describing data is number or word with graph on sleeve…Issues pop up then are connected by causal paths with links meaning ‘facilitates’ or ‘inhibits’ E.g. Invisible semantics inhibits understandabtility which inhibits ease of maintenance which inhibits flexibilty and agility. Self-describing data facilitates understandabilty. Easier to reuse facilitates fast evolution and agility. Automated reasoning facilitates consistency and reliability.Root of most problems are:Invisible Semantics Data SilosInformation and Complexity OverloadThese all have ripple effects on:Maintenance costs, Reuse, understandabiltiy, speed of evolution, agility, costs, reliability, consistency, Interoperability / Integration ‘We add three things that collectively address most of these problems1. self describing data – adding meaning 2. Easier data connections – Linked Data (overcome silos)3. Automated reasoning – to address complexity, reliability and add new capabilities
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  • Transcript of "Making the Case for Ontology"

    1. 1. 2011 Ontology Summit Communique: Making the Case for Ontology <br />Talk by: Michael Uschold<br />Content by: Ontolog Community <br />.<br />Tuesday 19 April 2011<br />Gaithersburg, MD<br />1<br />
    2. 2. Background<br />This talk is a companion to the Joint Communiqueof the Ontology Summit 2011, the sixth annual series of events in which the international ontology community explores a given topic over a series of online meetings culminating in a face-to-face symposium held at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).<br />Goal: The goal of the 2011 Ontology Summit is to assist in making the case for the use of ontology by providing concrete application examples, success/value metrics and advocacy strategies. This communique provides tips, guidelines, and strategies for making the case for ontology to a variety of potential beneficiaries and future stakeholders.<br />2<br />
    3. 3. Brief History of “O”<br />A solution looking for a problem.<br />‘O’ community searched and searched(80s & 90s)<br />Build more and more ontologies and more and more tools<br />3<br />
    4. 4. For a dozen years, still searching for commercial impact.<br />Main output:<br />Long lists of potential benefits<br />Lots of research prototypes<br />4<br />History of “O”<br />Can you spell ‘glacial’?<br />
    5. 5. Then Everything Changed (circa 2000)<br />Explosion of commercial interest and deployments began as a trickle around 2000.<br />Mid-late 2000s more and more reported deployments and benefits. <br />Surprise: reported benefits same as predicted!<br />5<br />
    6. 6. Recent Trends<br />Semantic Technology Conf. grows through recession<br />Semantic Technology Companies / Consultancies<br />2005: a few dozen<br />2010: several hundred<br />Bigger companies buying smaller ones<br />Patent Applications: <br />90s: a handful per year<br />Pre-recession: triple digits<br />Semantic Web Meetups: <br />100% annual growth for 3 yrs<br />6<br />
    7. 7. Today<br />Large numbers of deployed ontologies (100? 1000s?)<br />Dramatic increase in recent years<br />Technology is mature and ready for prime time <br />Still niche… Still too many blank stares.<br />Making the Case for Ontology is necessary for ontology to become mainstream.<br />7<br />
    8. 8. Target Audience <br />First: Ontology Technology Evangelists(you know who you are).<br />Second: Semantic Technology Evangelists<br />Third: Anyone interested in learning about practical value of Ontology and/or Semantic Technology <br />8<br />
    9. 9. Four Guidelines<br />Know who to target<br />Establish Relevance<br />Generate Excitement,Instill Confidence<br />Communicate Clearlyand Listen<br />9<br /><ul><li>Early adopters
    10. 10. Has problems that ontology can solve
    11. 11. Value, not technology
    12. 12. Relate to audience situation
    13. 13. Show how and why ontology adds value
    14. 14. Relevant success stories
    15. 15. Cite market trends & activity
    16. 16. Be realistic.
    17. 17. Concrete, not abstract
    18. 18. 1 liners and Elevator Speeches
    19. 19. Tailor to audience</li></li></ul><li>Building a Foundation for Making the Case<br />HERE and NOW:<br />Examples of Ontology Applications<br />Ontology Usage Framework<br />Value Models, Value Metrics and the Value Proposition<br />FUTURE: <br />Grand Challenges<br />OVER-ARCHING<br />Strategies for “Making the Case”<br />10<br />
    20. 20. Applications and Case Studies<br />Where and How are ontologies already being applied and delivering value?<br />Just about everywhere you look<br />Variety of mechanisms<br />For example:<br />Secure and dynamic infrastructure for combining wide variety of information on large scale.<br />Add intelligence to the user interface.<br />Semantic document processing in law, medicine, defense<br />Ontology-driven software engineering for dramatic improvements in speed of development and reliability. <br />11<br />
    21. 21. Applications and Case Studies<br />More Examples:<br />Improved monitoring and maintenance in manufacturing <br />Manage networks providing diagnostics, logistics, planning, scheduling & cyber-security<br />Build systems that know, learn, adapt and reason as people do – e.g. e-learning, tutors, advisors<br />Assess risk and compliance in policy-driven processes such as fraud, case management & emergency response<br />12<br />A Startling Variety!<br />
    22. 22. Ontology Usage Framework <br />GOALS<br />To better understand and classify ontology uses<br />A common way to compare and contrast (metadata)<br />Basis for a future searchable online catalog<br />Variety of Dimensions…<br />13<br />
    23. 23. Ontology Usage Framework <br />
    24. 24. Where is the value?<br />Five broad categories:<br />IT Efficiency <br />Operational Efficiency <br />Business Agility<br />Business Efficiency <br />Customer Satisfaction<br />15<br />Other value propositions:<br /><ul><li>Human understanding
    25. 25. Agility / Flexibility
    26. 26. Interoperability / Integration
    27. 27. Customer Satisfaction</li></ul>How to tell the story of value?<br />(hint: first GET the story!)<br />
    28. 28. Story of Value (1/4)<br />Manufacturing Quality Assurance<br />Defective Widgets:<br />1 in a 1000 widgets coming of the line are defective<br />All have same defect<br />Challenge: <br />Enormously complex manufacturing process<br />Countless possible pathways<br />Very time consuming to track down, may not succeed<br />16<br />
    29. 29. Story of Value (2/4)<br />Manufacturing Quality Assurance<br />SOLUTION: <br />Build ontologies for various aspects of business<br />Each machine, components and attributes <br />Manufacturing process pathways<br />Products <br />Capture data during manufacturing process;based on the ontologies<br />Query the system:<br />What is common among all defective widgets?<br />Answer: 99% of defective widgets came off one particular line<br />17<br />
    30. 30. Story of Value (3/4)<br />Manufacturing Quality Assurance<br />OUTCOME: <br />System uses data & knowledge to draw conclusionse.g. identify machines as source of problem<br />Go look at machines, notice defective part, replace it.<br />Generate a report as well<br />Used to take a week, now takes 10 minutes.<br />Customer: “We love ontologies.” Continued investment.<br />18<br />
    31. 31. 19<br />Story of Value (4/4)<br />Manufacturing Quality Assurance<br />Why Did It Work? <br />Flexibility: Traditional DB applications brittle, not able to support changing environment.<br />Interoperability / Integration: Ontologies are basis for linking across data silos.<br />Inference: In complex environment, reduce information overload.<br />Geekese for “Connectivity”<br />Geekese for “Drawing conclusions”<br />Get and tell this story.<br />
    32. 32. 20<br />Strategies for Different Audiences<br />
    33. 33. Clarify meaning and reduce complexity.<br />“Ontology is critical for you to know the difference between what you think you know and what you really know.”<br />“Francis Ford Coppola said ‘The secret to making a good movie is getting everyone to make the same movie.’  So it is with enterprises and that's what ontologies [can often] do.”<br />“Ontology … provide[s] a unified account of how human thought and machine data can be united into a Web of meaning.” <br />21<br />Emerging Themes – Sound Bites – Elevator Speeches<br />
    34. 34. Improve Agility and Flexibilty<br />“There are three main things that ontologies are good for: Flexibility, Flexibility and Flexibility.”<br />“The real world is complex and changing, you need a solution that can cope with that complexity and adapt with the changes. That's what ontology does for you”<br />“… [Ontologies] provide a powerful framework to manage, update and evolve the high value components of responsive, agile organizations.” <br />22<br />Emerging Themes – Sound Bites – Elevator Speeches<br />
    35. 35. Improve Interoperability and Integration<br />"Ontology enables semantic interoperability by presenting information consistently across organizations and domains and machines" <br />“Growing complexity and a need for smarter use of resources and solutions that cut across silos, means that it has become ever important to make explicit [our] implicit ontologies thereby easing interoperability and improving operational effectiveness.... ” <br />23<br />Emerging Themes – Sound Bites – Elevator Speeches<br />
    36. 36. A New Paradigm?<br />"Ontology does for machines what the World Wide Web did for people." <br />"Ontology promises to be the driver for the next paradigm shift. If you think personal computing, and the Internet have been disruptive, wait and see what Ontology can bring about." <br />“Everything in IT up till now has been about technology first and business a distant second. But semantic and ontological technology are different ... No other technology has ever really been primarily about the work of business.”<br />24<br />Emerging Themes – Sound Bites – Elevator Speeches<br />
    37. 37. Story of Value: Generic<br />25<br />Can do more!<br />Hinders<br />Agility / Flexibility<br />Facilitates<br />Cheaper<br />Interoperability / Integration <br />Clear Meaning / Agreement<br />Ontological analysis <br />Root of Evil<br />Root of Good<br />Data Silos<br />Ambiguity<br />
    38. 38. Story of Value: Generic<br />26<br />Can do more!<br />Hinders<br />Agility / Flexibility<br />Facilitates<br />Cheaper<br />Interoperability / Integration <br />Maintenance <br />Consistency/Reliabilty<br />Clear Meaning / Agreement<br />Ontological analysis <br />Inference <br />Root of Evil<br />Root of Good<br />Data Silos<br />Info. Overload & Complexity<br />Ambiguity<br />
    39. 39. Story of Value: Generic<br />27<br />Can do more!<br />Hinders<br />Agility / Flexibility<br />Facilitates<br />Cheaper<br />Interoperability / Integration <br />Maintenance <br />Less Complex<br />Consistency/Reliabilty<br />Clear Meaning / Agreement<br />Ontological analysis <br />Inference <br />Root of Evil<br />Root of Good<br />Data Silos<br />Info. Overload & Complexity<br />Ambiguity<br />
    40. 40. Semantic Web - Graph data structures(flexibility)<br />Machine Learning<br />Natural Language processing<br />Similarity technology <br />28<br />Natural Synergy with “Semantic Technology” <br />
    41. 41. Ontology is about clarifying meaning and supporting inference <br />Key value propositions are:<br />Getting to shared understanding<br />Flexibility/agility<br />Interoperability Integration <br />Ontology technology is ready for prime time<br />29<br />The Main Message<br />Go Forth and Ontologize!<br />
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