Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Campus and Community; Impacts & Benefits Brief

137

Published on

a brochure brief summarizing key elements of the Community Impacts & Benefits realized through Wentworth Institute of Technology's Community & Learning Partnerships Initiatives. This piece was …

a brochure brief summarizing key elements of the Community Impacts & Benefits realized through Wentworth Institute of Technology's Community & Learning Partnerships Initiatives. This piece was produced as a companion to the Institute's Community Benefits Plan, a component of the Institutional Master Plan filed with and approved by the City of Boston for 2010-2020.

Published in: Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
137
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Wentworth and the Community
  • 2. Mission Hill as viewed from atop Bea y Hall on Wentworth’s CampusFor more than 100 years, Wentworth Institute of This report offers additional details on howTechnology has been proud to call the Mission Wentworth engages this vision for campus andHill and Fenway neighborhoods in the city of community partnerships, ranging from our manyBoston its home. Just as Boston has grown and service-learning partnerships to our commitmentschanged over that time, Wentworth has evolved to Mission Hill, Fenway, and the City of Boston.from a trade school into a higher education insti-tution granting both undergraduate and graduate Sincerely,degrees in the disciplines of engineering, technol- Zorica Pantić, EE, Ph.D.ogy, design, and management. PresidentThe Institute remains steadfast in its commitmentto serving its community by providing a practicalmeans to a high-quality technical education. Aswe build for the next hundred years, Wentworthwill continue to be a student-focused institutionof academic excellence offering high-quality un-dergraduate, graduate, and lifelong learning pro-grams that are both accessible and affordable; itwill provide community service through urbanengagement and service learning; and foster eco-nomic growth by providing the workforce withhighly skilled professionals.
  • 3. CONTENTS Academic Excellence, Affordability & Access Community Service & Learning Mee ng Public Responsibili es through Part- nerships Economic Impacts & Community Benefits
  • 4. Academic Excellence, Affordability & Access Wentworth is committed to providing a high-quality, career-focused education that blends classroom, lab and real-world experience through cooperative education. Further, the Institute is committed to providing such an education in a manner that is both accessible and affordable to residents of Boston, the Commonwealth, and beyond.Scholarships for the Boston Public SchoolsCommunity PartnershipsAs an integral part of the commit- Over the past several years, Went-ment to Boston and its residents, worth has started to align its Bos-Wentworth annually provides 14 ton Public School Partnershipsfull year scholarships to graduates with three key schools/programsof Boston Public High Schools. that include the John D. O’ Bry- ant School of Mathematics andFour scholarships are specifically Science, the Engineering Schooldesignated for residents of the Mis- and the Tech Boston Program. Itsion Hill and Fenway neighbor- is with these key partners thathoods with one additional full Wentworth hopes to lay the foun-scholarship to a community resi- dation for and invest in a range ofdent attending Wentworth’s even- programming and coordination thating programs, and one scholarship over time will yield a richer experi-designated each year for employ- ence for students of those schoolsees of the City of Boston who wish and programs as well as a largerto pursue an associate’s degree. and more successful pipeline of Boston Public Schools (BPS) grad- uates to attend and graduate from Wentworth. In 2010 Wentworth awarded more than $425,000 in community scholarships
  • 5. College Awareness A Different Approach toby Design Workforce DevelopmentThe Boston chapter of the Archi- Project STRIVE is a school-to-tecture, Construction, and Engi- work transition program for BPSneering (ACE) program is run students with a variety of specialcollaboratively through Gilbane needs, including physical, cogni-and Turner Construction compa- tive, and emotional disabilities.nies with support from staff and Currently more than 50 studentsstudents at Wentworth. work at Wentworth on a daily basis at the Institute’s RecyclingThe program seeks out high Training Center, where they areschool students interested in ACE hired by Wentworth as an em-fields and pairs them one-on-one ployee and supervised bywith industry mentors. The stu- STRIVE “job coaches.” Studentsdents and mentors meet bi- learn valuable work and socialweekly for three hour sessions. skills and also gain the satisfac-Students work in teams on hands- tion of holding a paying job foron projects presented at the con- the first time. In 20 years, moreclusion of each academic year. the 1,500 students have been em- ployed by the program.
  • 6. Community Service and Service Overall, the Center connects theLearning initiatives at Went- various forms of engagement,worth are coordinated by the ranging from a day of volunteer-Center for Community and ing to a semester of classroom-Learning Partnerships. Each based service learning, to pro-year nearly 2,000 students and duce substantive and sustaineddozens of faculty members pro- partnerships.vide more than 100,000 hours of Community Service & service through projects, pro-grams, and activities coordinat-ed by the Center. Learning Between 2005 and 2010,Wentworth’s stu dent an d fac-ulty contributions throughcommunity-based wo rk an dservice had an estimated$14,250,000 in economicvalue as calculated by thenumber of hours s ervedmultiplied b y th e value o fan hour of service in M assa-chusetts as establish ed b yIndependent Sector.
  • 7. Foundations of Service &Learning @ Wentworth Since the start of this programIn 2001, before the establishment more than 150 students have beenof the Center for Community and trained and have passed an inten-Learning Partnerships at Went- sive taxation exam to prepare bothworth, Professor Jonathan Guever- federal and state tax forms.ra from the Humanities, Social The student (and now alumni) vol-Sciences, & Management depart- unteers have prepared taxes free ofment proposed the idea of organiz- charge for more than 1,000 low-ing student volunteers to prepare income residents of Mission Hill,taxes for community residents for Fenway, and Boston helping real-free. ize more than one and half millionAfter a period of discussions and dollars in tax returns and earnedplanning, in 2002 a small group of income credits.student volunteers led by ProfessorGueverra came together in partner-ship with ABCD Parker Hill-Fenway and the IRS to form theVolunteer Income Tax AssistanceProgram (commonly known as VI-TA).Since 2002, Wentworth student, faculty, and alumni volunteers havehelped more than 1,000 low‐income individuals and families realize taxreturns exceeding $1,500,000 in value.
  • 8. Campus & Community Policing Open Space and Neighborhood MaintenanceWentworth police officers monitor the Institute’s cam- Wentworth allows neighbors and visitors access topus property, the adjacent residential neighborhoods, campus and the use of open space areas, recreationaland the public streets 24 hours a day, seven days a facilities, athletic fields, and the campus library andweek. The Wentworth Police Department (WPD) em- dining facilities. In the course of maintaining campusploys a staff of 11 certified Massachusetts Special properties, Wentworth makes a concerted effort toState Police Officers who are also sworn deputy sher- clean city sidewalks, curbsides, and catch basins adja-iffs of Suffolk County and are certified Emergency cent to campus properties.Medical Technicians. In 2009, the Institute’s publicsafety operations expenditures amounted to The Institute also participates in various neighborhood$1,481,136. beautification projects and maintains two public parks. Wentworth made a capital contribution of $75,000 to-WPD coordinates initiatives to promote off-campus wards the improvement of Evans Way Park in 2002student safety and to improve student/neighbor rela- and the Institute also maintains this public park and thetionships; addresses student behavior problems in the Mass College of Art Park incurring an annual cost ofneighborhood; and refers students for disciplinary ac- approximately $40,000.tion to the Institute’s Office of Community Standards;and participates in Mission Hill Crime Committeemeetings, Problem Properties Task Force meetings,and weekend/late-night “Ride-Alongs” with the Bos-ton Police Department.Meeting Public Responsibilities Through Partnerships
  • 9. Collaborating to Re-build a CommunityIn 2006 Mission Hill Neighborhood Housing Services Parcel, to support the redevelopment of the Roxbury(MHNHS) launched a community visioning and plan- Crossing. With the Gurney Street Parcel, MHNHSning process concerning a vacant city-owned parcel at plans to construct approximately 40 units of afforda-Roxbury crossing known as Parcel 25. Through this ble senior housing. As of November 2009, the Gurneyeffort MHNHS’s successfully bid to redevelop the Street property had an assessed value of $147,300 andparcel in spring of 2009, and the process is now wind- an appraised value of approximately $200,000.ing its way from planning to implementation.Wentworth has been a collaborator throughout thisprocess and has committed to contributing four par-cels of land, collectively known as the Gurney Street
  • 10. Leveraging In addition to the approximately $1.5 million Wentworth expends on community benefits each year, the Institute also contributesPartnerships through annually to the City of Boston’s Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) program. In fiscal year 2009-2010, the Institute paidPayments in Lieu of $36,468 in PILOT contributions in addition to $117,095 in other taxes and fees to the City of Boston.Taxes As a part of Wentworth’s participation in the PILOT program to date, the Institute has implemented three community service pro- jects funded in part by a negotiated allocation of 25% of the Insti- tute’s annual PILOT commitments. These projects include sup- porting the Mission Hill Wireless Network project, installation of “Big Belly” trash receptacles in Mission Hill, and placement of a College Advising Corps member at the John D. O’Brant School.PILOT Project Highlight:Mission Hill Wireless Net-workIn collaboration with BostonMain Streets, Wentworth estab-lished the first node of a plannedneighborhood WiFi network toprovide free wireless Internetaccess to residents in the nearbyAlice Taylor and Mission Mainhousing developments. The pro-ject has extended beyond theoriginal three-year commitmentand now has been incorporatedinto broader efforts led by OpenAir Boston to bring additionalservice to nearby businesses andnonprofits in Mission Hill andthe Fenway. Wentworth contin-ues to support the program byproviding the internet connec-tion, roof rights for staging ofequipment, electricity, and stor-age.
  • 11. Sustaining Meaningful Partnerships Wentworth is committed to com- An example of Wentworth’s com- munity-campus partnerships that mitment to community is the Insti- are sustained over the long term; tute’s partnership with Main layer resources, projects and pro- Streets. This collaboration has last- grams, and are rooted in a mutual ed for more than a decade, stem- understanding of assets and ming from faculty members and needs. These partnerships create students who have volunteered on both a more effective learning en- boards and committees of more vironment and a more effective than one district. vehicle for constructive communi- ty impact. To date, nearly 500 students have worked to carry out three dozen service learning projects including conducting market research, fa- çade redesign, streetscape survey- ing, and website development.“Wentworth has become a true partner of the City of Boston. Their civic in‐volvement shows their dedica on to improving our great city.” ~ Mayor Thomas. M. Menino
  • 12. Economic Employment As of January 31, 2009, Went- Wentworth’s payroll and benefits for Fiscal Year 2009 totaled ap- proximately $39,781,000.Impacts & worth employed a total of 743 full -time and part-time faculty and Local Purchasing staff members, approximatelyCommunity 32% (240) of whom are Boston Wentworth is committed to posi- residents. Wentworth also funds tively contributing to the economy 195 positions through private con- of the City of Boston and theBene its tractors who provide operational state. In fiscal year 2009, the Insti- services in the areas of cleaning, tute made operating and capital food service, health services, copy purchases (not including major and mail center, receiving and se- construction) in excess of curity. Approximately 59% (114) $22,000,000, of which of the individuals employed by $15,572,000 was from vendors these service contractors are Bos- within Massachusetts. Further- ton residents. more, $5,318,000 of those pur- chases was from vendors within In total, Wentworth employs a the City of Boston. total of 938 personnel, of which 38 % are Boston residents. Each year, Wentworth conducts more than $15 million in business with Massachuse s- based vendors.
  • 13. Wentworth’s Community Benefits Plan Center for Community and Learning Partnerships and we will build upon these foundations with sustainedIn filing for its ten-year Institutional Master Plan with support, new resources, and a renewed commitment tothe City of Boston in 2010, the Institute proposed a partnerships that will leverage community benefits in-Community Benefits Plan focused on two primary ob- vestments to achieve a greater impact.jectives: Specifically, the Institute will channel resources into1. Enhance educational opportunities for the young four key initiative areas: people of the City of Boston 1. Service Learning and Civic Engagement2. Contribute to and support neighborhoods 2. Workforce Development,These objectives will be achieved through partnershipswith our neighbors community-based organizations, and 3. College Access and Success, andthe City of Boston. Our long-standing practice of part-nerships was enhanced with the establishment of the 4. Community-Campus RelationsWentworth Community Benefits Plan HighlightsWentworth Investment Annual Cumulative (2010-2020)Service Learning and Civic $413,000 $4,130,000Engagement Operations &FacilitiesBPS & Neighborhood Schol- $425,000 $4,250,000arshipsProject STRIVE and BPS/ $461,600 $4,616,000School-to-Career ProjectOperations & FacilitiesCommunity Policing $150,000 $1,500,000Cash and in-kind community $100,000 $1,000,000supportTotal $1,549,000 $15,490,000
  • 14. Key ContactsOffice of the President: (617) 989-4476Community Relations: (617) 989-4478 WENTWORTHCenter for Community and Learning Partnerships: INSTITUTE OF (617) 989-4992 TECHNOLOGYWentworth Public Safety: (617) 989-4400Office of Community Standards: (617) 989-4486 550 HUNTINGTON AVEHuman Resources: (617) 989-4190Admissions: (617) 989-4000 BOSTON, MA 02115General Information/Directory: (617) 989-4590 WWW.WIT.EDU

×