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How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update
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How to Prepare Your Data Center for 2014: Cooling and Airflow Update

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As 2014 is upon is, it's time to reexamine your cooling and airflow management strategy. This presentation takes a high level look at what metrics you should be monitoring, and what specific steps you …

As 2014 is upon is, it's time to reexamine your cooling and airflow management strategy. This presentation takes a high level look at what metrics you should be monitoring, and what specific steps you can take to increase the efficiency of your data center in 2014.

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  • 1. With 2014 just around the corner, its time to think of how you can improve your facility.
  • 2. With 2013 drawing to a close, you’ve got some things to think about for 2014...     Demands continue as high as ever for increased data center efficiency, capacity, and reliability. The threat of downtime continues to be real as data centers become more densely packed. However, releasing stranded cooling capacity (i.e. reducing bypass airflow) makes it easier to increase computer room density and reduce carbon emissions, safely and efficiently. Comprehensive systems like DCIM and full Containment will continue to be heavily discussed, but first you should consider simple, practical steps that can make a huge difference in your efficiency. We found that the average data center can reduce hotspots and better manage intake temperatures through practical, affordable solutions like correctly installed blanking panels. There is more ‘fundamental’ work to be done like this than you may think. Effectively managing your airflow not only makes your equipment run better, but it also reduces energy usage, which saves money and reduces your carbon footprint. We have found that the average data center could save at least $32,000 annually by taking some of these simple, easy-to-implement steps.
  • 3. Let’s discuss the basics.
  • 4. What is bypass airflow?    When your data center has cable openings, it obviously requires you to run more fans to provide vital conditioned air to your heat load. This state of cooling inefficiency is a prime example of bypass airflow, which is any conditioned air supplied by a cooling unit that does not pass through (bypasses) IT equipment before returning to a cooling unit. Cable openings in a raised floor and excessive volumes of cold air delivered to a cold aisle are two principal sources of bypass airflow. Learn more in our Bypass Airflow White Paper >>
  • 5. The average data center has a cooling capacity nearly 4 times the IT load!    Based on a recent research study conducted by Upsite Technologies of 45 data centers worldwide, we found that the average data center uses almost 3 times more cooling than needed to safely support the IT load. Poor airflow management accounts for nearly half of conditioned air in data centers escaping through unsealed cable openings and misplaced perforated tiles. These common openings result in bypass airflow.
  • 6. According to PUE…     As Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE) analysis reveals, the cooling infrastructure is the largest consumer of power in a data center. Airflow management (AFM) remains the easiest and lowest-cost way to improve cooling infrastructure efficiency and capacity. However, even if your site makes strides to improve AFM and you must keep up your efforts and closely manage them over time. Some infrastructure components will require performance validation that is often not part of a standard maintenance agreement.
  • 7. Let’s discuss the metrics.
  • 8. 6 Key AFM metrics to include in your monthly report: AFM Metrics Cooling Capacity Factor (CCF) Rack Space Utilization Perforated Tile and Grate Placement Blanking Panel Utilization IT Equipment Intake Temperatures Raised Floor Open Area Percentage
  • 9. Metric 1: Cooling Capacity Factor (CCF) What is it?  A metric Upsite developed to determine the cooling effectiveness of a data center. Measures the cooling output relative to the IT load, providing an accurate picture of cooling infrastructure efficiency. What does it mean?  Calculating the CCF is the quickest and easiest way to determine cooling infrastructure utilization and potential gains to be realized by AFM improvements. The CCF is calculated by:  Convert the total rated (stated) cooling capacity to kW, divide by 110% of the IT critical load (kW)  Total rated cooling capacity (210 tons x 3.52) = 739 kW  110% of the IT critical load = 259 kW  CCF = 2.8 (739/259)  Running cooling capacity is 280% of the load
  • 10. Metric 1: Cooling Capacity Factor (CCF) CCF Rating Interpretation 1.0 to 1.1 There is little to no redundant cooling or room for reducing OpEx. 1.1 to 1.2 The number of running cooling units is very closely coupled to the heat load in the room. 1.2 to 1.5 There is moderate opportunity for savings from turning off cooling units. This can often only be done once AFM improvements have been effectively implemented. 1.5 to 3.0 Most common. These rooms have substantial opportunity to reduce operating cost, improve the IT environment, and increase the IT load that can be effectively cooled. Rooms in this range often have significant stranded cooling capacity that can be freed up by improving AFM. > 3.0 Have great potential for improvement since the total rated cooling capacity of running units is at least three times 110% of the IT load.
  • 11. Metric 1: Cooling Capacity Factor (CCF) Calculate your CCF using the free online Cooling Capacity Factor Calculator http://upsite.com/cooling-calculator
  • 12. Metric 2: Perforated Tile & Grate Placement Perforated tiles and grates should only be located in front of equipment that requires conditioned air for cooling. The percentage of properly located perforated tiles and grates should be 100%. Place perforated tiles and grates to make all IT equipment intake air temperatures as low and even as possible. Replace all perforated tiles and grates located in dedicated hot aisles and open spaces with solid tiles. Helpful Tip: Start with an infrared temperature survey (instructions on next slide)
  • 13. Metric 2: Perforated Tile & Grate Placement How to conduct an infrared temperature survey Step 1: First, use an infrared thermometer to measure the intake air temperatures. If they are all cool and the ceiling is cool, then there is more conditioned air being delivered to the aisle than needed. Step 2: Start removing perforated tiles and measure the intake air temperatures again. Step 3: Repeat Step 2 until you find that the intake air temperatures start to increase. Then, add tiles back until you resolve the problem. This process establishes the optimum airflow needed for that aisle.
  • 14. Metric 3: IT Equipment Intake Temperatures The primary purpose of a computer room is to provide a stable and appropriate intake air temperature for IT equipment. As such, computer rooms are in either of two categories, those with and those without intake air temperature problems.
  • 15. Metric 4: Raised Floor Open Area Percentage Raised floor bypass open area is made up of unsealed cable openings and penetrations, and perforated tiles placed in hot aisles or open areas. The percentage of raised floor bypass open area is calculated by dividing the total bypass open area by the total open area in the raised floor. The percentage of bypass open area should be less than 10%. Image courtesy of Tateinc.com
  • 16. Metric 5: Blanking Panel Utilization Install blanking panels that seal effectively, with no gaps between panels, in all open spaces within cabinets. Spaces between cabinets and under cabinets need to be sealed to retain conditioned air at the IT equipment face and to prevent hot exhaust air from flowing into the cold aisle. The percentage of open U spaces filled with blanking panels should be 100%. Close all open space of the vertical plane of IT equipment intakes. Install blanking panels, seal under cabinets, and seal between mounting rails and sides of cabinets.
  • 17. Metric 6: Rack Space Utilization The utilization of rack space is important to understanding how well the valuable space of a computer room is being utilized. Cooling capacity and planning are closely related to rack space utilization.
  • 18. In addition to the 6 metrics to monitor regularly, another key aspect of your overall AFM improvement strategy is to regularly validate your IT cooling equipment performance. Here’s what to look for:  Calibration of Cooling Unit Return-Air Temperature and Relative Humidity Sensors  Presence of Latent Cooling  Return Air Temperature vs. Standard Rated Conditions
  • 19. Return Air Temperature vs. Standard Rated Conditions Manufacturers rate their cooling units on standard return-air conditions, typically 75 degrees (F) with a 45 percent relative humidity (RH%). However, since most sites run their cooling units with set points lower than standard conditions, the rated capacity cannot be delivered. This results in the very costly condition of more cooling units running because the cooling unit’s cooling capacity decreases at lower return-air temperatures.
  • 20. Presence of Latent Cooling In some IT configurations, high relative humidity (RH%) can result in condensation forming on cooling unit coils (i.e. latent cooling). Moisture condensing on cooling unit coils actually gives off heat that consumes some of a cooling unit’s cooling capacity, stranding capacity that could otherwise be used to reduce the air temperature of the supply air to IT equipment.
  • 21. Calibration of Cooling Unit Return-Air Temperature and Relative Humidity Sensors To accurately assess cooling unit return-air temperatures and latent cooling conditions, ensure that you regularly calibrate all cooling unit return-air temperature and relative humidity (RH%) sensors.
  • 22. How to get started in improving your AFM in four easy steps: 1. 2. 3. 4. Determine Cooling Utilization Assess Current AFM Initiatives Implement Improvements, In The Right Order Maintain With Organizational Best Practices
  • 23. Start with our free online Cooling Capacity Factor Calculator at http://upsite.com/cooling-calculator
  • 24. Raised Floor The Rack The Row
  • 25. • Implement 4Rs in right order • Adjust cooling infrastructure • Measure intakes • Measure CCF • Repeat to achieve target CCF
  • 26.  Ensure IT and Facilities are coordinated  Document processes for personnel working the room  Implement training protocols  Clearly state company objectives that cooling optimization can support  Schedule regular assessments  Limit access to computer room  Centralize decision-making process for changes  Regular reporting to senior management (e.g. PUE, CCF, utility bill, other related trends to track)  Appoint a ‘cooling czar’ and give them authority
  • 27. A computer room is a dynamic environment, so it’s unrealistic to expect that these key AFM metrics would not drift over time. Therefore, closely tracking each will help assure that your cooling infrastructure will be operating at maximum capacity, maximum reliability, and the lowest operating cost (and best PUE) in 2014.
  • 28. Download our free white paper: Upsite.com/cooling-capacity-factor-white-paper

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