Yolande Burgess, London Councils - What collaboration can achieve

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Yolande Burgess, London Councils - What collaboration can achieve

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Yolande Burgess, London Councils - What collaboration can achieve

  1. 1. www.londoncouncils.gov.uk What collaboration can achieve Yolande Burgess, London Councils Young People's Education and Skills
  2. 2. Aim of this workshop To demonstrate how local government and Higher Education can collaboratively: • take an evidence-based approach to addressing priorities • contribute to national as well as local priorities • consider fully the whole student lifecycle
  3. 3. What we did know • The shape of education across the 14-19 age range • The key issues for this age range affecting participation, attainment and progression • A good understanding of the characteristics of disengaged young people and a sound knowledge of local reengagement activity • A lot of intelligence on activity for lower achievers to reach level 3 by the age of 19
  4. 4. What we needed to know more about • Higher Education (HE) intelligence beyond the national statistical releases • The detail behind the HE journey of young London residents - participation, attainment and progression • The skills HE was providing compared to the skills the London labour market was seeking • Information on whether the HE investment was paying off - where our graduates getting good jobs
  5. 5. 5 or more A*-C GCSE (including E&M) 70 60 50 North East East Midlands South West 40 Yorkshire and the Humber East of England 30 North West West Midlands South East 20 London 10 0 2006 2007 Intelligent London 2013 - 2013 GCSE and equivalent results 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013
  6. 6. GCE A level and level 3 results London 730 England (state-funded mainstream) 728.2 720 710 712.8 714.3 706.3 700 695.1 690 682.7 680 670 London Points per student 2010/11 England (state-funded mainstream) 215 2011/12 2012/13 214.5 Points per entry 214 213 213.1 212 211 210.5 209.3 210 209.5 209 208 2010/11 Department for Education A level and other level 3 results in England: academic year 2012 to 2013 2011/12 2012/13
  7. 7. Level 3 at 19 (national) Level 2 and 3 attainment by young people in England, SFR 13/2013, DfE
  8. 8. Level 3 by 19 (mainstream) 65% 60% 55% East Midlands East of England 50% London North East 45% South East South West 40% West Midlands 35% 30% 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Intelligent London 2013 - Department for Education Attainment by Young People in England Measured Using Matched Administrative Data: Attainment by Age 19 in 2012
  9. 9. Qualifications - Level 4+ Intelligent London 2013 - Population Census 2011
  10. 10. Unemployment 16-24 year olds London unemployment rate - all 16-24 year olds UK unemployment rate - all 16-24 year olds London unemployment rate - 16-24 excluding full-time students UK unemployment rate - 16-24 year excluding full-time students 30.0 25.0 20.0 15.0 10.0 Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun Jul-Sep Oct-Dec Jan-Mar Apr-Jun 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2011 2011 2011 2011 2012 2012 2012 2012 2013 2013 Greater London Authority London Labour Market Indicators - youth unemployment September 2013
  11. 11. Skills shortages UKCES Skills Survey 2011 proportion of establishments with a skill-shortage vacancy by region
  12. 12. “Drowning problems in an ocean of information is not the same as solving them” Ray E. Brown
  13. 13. Project background and collaboration • Good local research undertaken by Newham and the University of East London showed a potential way forward • A partnership approach - offering the ‘scale’ of London provided researchers with: – the opportunity to work on city-wide analysis – sufficient scale to deliver robust information from the HESA Student Return and the Destinations of Leavers from HE Survey
  14. 14. Developing the ‘London story’ • Analysis of progression to university of 18-24 year old London residents in 2011/12 – full/part-time, first/undergraduate degree study (UK universities) • Time-series analysis showing trends across five years • Outcomes from HE study - degree classifications and post-degree destinations, including employment and salary range
  15. 15. Disseminating project outcomes • Wide distribution of the regional report and borough reports • Political briefing sent out to 1,861 elected local councillors – Does Higher Education investment pay off for young Londoners? • Launch event December 2013 at UEL attended by 50 plus professionals from local authorities, further and higher education • Action on Access-UUK-OFFA-HEFCE conference today
  16. 16. The research bonus • A comprehensive London-wide and borough-level analysis of the HE journey of young London residents: a regional and local evidence base • A means of engaging London’s political leaders into the HE world • A ‘line of sight’ through education from age 14 to 24: the relationship between different stages of education and pathways to employment • Developing a more refined understanding of the relationship between skills and the London labour market: one in every five young people in the UK are not in education, employment or training; by 2022 this will have cost the economy nearly £28 billion
  17. 17. The Higher Education Journey of young London residents http://members.londoncouncils.gov.uk/London%2520Councils/The HigherEducationjourneyofyoungLondonresidentsFIN.pdf

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