Challenge, risk and opportunity –
(collaborative courses and)
international accreditation
Stephen Williams, International
...
Collaborative Courses (1)
At Warwick these fall into 5 broad categories:
• Franchised courses
• Validated courses
• Distan...
Collaborative Courses (2)
• All collaborative courses approved by Collaborative,
Flexible and Distributed Learning Sub-Com...
Collaborative Strategy: drivers
• To continue to grow PGR numbers
• To make every student an international student,
workin...
Collaborative Strategy: drivers
• To expand cooperation in teaching to develop
joint Master’s and Doctoral programmes, clo...
Collaborative Policy
“As a leading international institution with a
strong reputation, Warwick encourages
certain types of...
What has to be considered
• Finance
– Business case, demand
• Teaching quality
• Legal (duration, exit)
• Immigration
• In...
Warwick’s approval processes
• Departmental approval
• In-principle (Strategic) Approval
• Financial planning/approval
• A...
Erasmus Mundus
Courses developed out of existing research
collaborations:
• Joint Master’s in International Performance
Re...
Double Degree with the
University of Konstanz
• Built on a strong history of Erasmus student
exchange at UG level
• 2-year...
Capacity building
Ethiopia Project (Warwick Law School/Ethiopian
Ministry of Education):
• Aim 1: To create and establish ...
Opportunities
Collaborative courses:
• can develop strategic partnerships (research;
business/industry; capacity-building)...
Challenges
• Navigating the diversity of TNE provision
• Gathering intelligence (e.g. regulatory frameworks)
• Marrying di...
Risks (1)
The route you take will depend on your appetite for
risk and on your drivers for doing it:
• Do the perceived be...
Risks (2)
University of Wales pulls in its tentacles
Times Higher Education, 4 October 2011
“The University of Wales has p...
Truisms?
• A collaborative course by Warwick + University
X is bound to attract students
• A collaborative course is a gre...
Weighing up whether to do this
• We have a duty of care to our students
• We’re in this for the long-term – 10 year life
c...
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Stephen Williams - Challenge, risk and opportunity - international accreditation

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  • The QAA has defined collaborative provision as denoting “educational provision leading to an award, or to specific credit towards an award, of an awarding institution delivered and/or supported and/or assessed through an arrangement with a partner organisation.”In the case of Warwick, the normal types of collaborative arrangement into which departments have entered which require approval through the Collaborative, Flexible and Distributed-Learning Sub-Committee normally fall into one of the following five broad categories:franchised courses, where the University has designed a course and agrees that a partner college or other organisation can deliver it on our behalf.validated courses, where the University agrees that a course designed and delivered by a partner college or other organisation meets the standards required for the award of a Warwick qualification.distance delivery courses, where Warwick staff travel to a partner organisation, often overseas, to deliver modules or a course leading to a Warwick award.joint, dual/double or multiple award courses, where a course is delivered by the University and a partner university, college or other organisation with degree awarding powers, and the final award bears the name of Warwick and one or more other Higher Education institutions.other collaborative courses, where a course may be designed and delivered by the University and a partner university, college or other organisation, which do not conform exactly to any of the models defined above.
  • The University’s Vision 2015 Strategy sets out ambitious aims to make Warwick an international beacon, whilst strengthening our sense of community and increasing our engagement with stakeholders in the local community and nationwide. These aims will be realised in different ways as we continue to develop collaborative research and teaching with leading Universities in Europe and around the world, with a particular emphasis on our current and prospective core partners, and expand cooperation in teaching to develop joint masters and Doctoral programmes.In support of these aims, the University therefore encourages certain types of collaborative partnerships in teaching which meet specific criteria and which contribute to our Vision 2015 Strategy goals against one or more of the following objectives:To continue to grow PGR numbersTo make every student an international student, working with our core partner Universities to ensure that all students wishing to take up a period of study overseas have the opportunity to do soTo improve international diversity regardless of backgroundTo develop collaborative teaching internationally with leading institutions in Europe and around the worldTo expand cooperation in teaching to develop joint Masters and Doctoral programmes, closely integrating the activities of some of our international partnersTo grow Warwick’s visibility and positive impacts across sub-Saharan AfricaTo ensure local communities benefit from the University’s facilities and presence in the regionTo invest in our core operation through commercial income growth and efficiency
  • The University’s Vision 2015 Strategy sets out ambitious aims to make Warwick an international beacon, whilst strengthening our sense of community and increasing our engagement with stakeholders in the local community and nationwide. These aims will be realised in different ways as we continue to develop collaborative research and teaching with leading Universities in Europe and around the world, with a particular emphasis on our current and prospective core partners, and expand cooperation in teaching to develop joint masters and Doctoral programmes.In support of these aims, the University therefore encourages certain types of collaborative partnerships in teaching which meet specific criteria and which contribute to our Vision 2015 Strategy goals against one or more of the following objectives (see slides)
  • (a) Academic matters There should be a clear rationale for any proposed collaboration, and good prospects of it being successful. Partner institutions will normally be of a similar status to the University of Warwick, but collaborations may be considered with predominantly teaching institutions where there is a strong case for doing so, for example strength in particular academic disciplines or a desire to build capacity.It is not considered of fundamental importance whether collaborative proposals originate within a particular academic department, perhaps as part of an existing research link, or whether they are developed as part of an institutional level partnership. In all cases, however, appropriate academic expertise should be available within the University to support the collaboration and a lead academic department should be able to recommend the proposal as an enhancement to its academic development.Consideration may also be given as to whether the collaboration might lead students on to further University courses, or whether it strengthens the University’s policy on continuing and post-experience education.(b) Classification and location of partner organisationsThe University makes the distinction between three types of partner organisations and the sites at which they deliver collaborative courses:(i) The partner is geographically proximate to the University.(ii) The partner is geographically less convenient, although UK-based, but to the University’s advantage. Each such case will be considered on its merit in the light of the special circumstances put forward in favour of the link.(iii) The partner is an overseas organisation of good standing.Warwick acknowledges that appropriate partnerships in categories (i) and (ii) can support its objectives of developing links with the local and regional community and promoting life-long learning. In addition, certain overseas partnerships in category (iii), established on a sound financial basis which allows sufficient resources for regular contact to permit the monitoring of academic standards, may assist the University in meeting its objectives as an international University where the partnerships will and contribute to enhancing the University’s reputation in key overseas locations.
  • http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/quality/categories/courseapproval/
  • Joint Masters in International Performance Research (2007). Amsterdam, Tampere, University of the Arts BelgradeJoint doctorate in Globalisation, EU & Multilateralism (2009). Free University of Brussels (ULB), LUISS, Rome, Geneva, Waseda, Fudan + associated partners Boston, ITAM, and UNU-CRIS.Also, MEDEG (Economic Development and Growth) – Carlos III Madrid, LundAlso, Complex Systems Science – EcolePolytechnique, Chalmers, GothenburgIssues:Application deadlines - “due next week”“European” PhDFees
  • Warwick PhD Programme As part of the Ethiopia Capacity Building Project entered into between Warwick Law School and the Higher Education Strategy Centre of the Ethiopian Ministry of Education. Eighteen students from Ethiopia are currently registered with the University of Warwick for the degree of PhD.Under the PhD programme the students, many of whom are university lecturers or members of the judiciary, remain resident in Ethiopia but visit Warwick annually for a four or five week residency during which time they work intensively with their supervisors.The research being undertaken by the students will contribute significantly to the available literature on law in Ethiopia particularly from a Law in Development perspective. Full details of the various research projects being undertaken by the students can be found on the Student Profile and e-portfolio pages.
  • Example of different legislative backgrounds: WMG and Beijing City University
  • Stephen Williams - Challenge, risk and opportunity - international accreditation

    1. 1. Challenge, risk and opportunity – (collaborative courses and) international accreditation Stephen Williams, International Office, University of Warwick
    2. 2. Collaborative Courses (1) At Warwick these fall into 5 broad categories: • Franchised courses • Validated courses • Distance delivery courses • Joint, dual/double, or multiple awards • Other collaborative courses
    3. 3. Collaborative Courses (2) • All collaborative courses approved by Collaborative, Flexible and Distributed Learning Sub-Committee and listed in Collaborative Course Register • All courses approved fit with University Collaborative Strategy and within the parameters of the Collaborative Policy • Warwick does not operate a general accreditation or validation service: “Speculative applications for validating or accrediting all of a college's courses will normally be declined”
    4. 4. Collaborative Strategy: drivers • To continue to grow PGR numbers • To make every student an international student, working with core partners to ensure all students wishing to study overseas have the opportunity to do so • To improve international diversity regardless of background • To develop collaborative teaching internationally with leading institutions in Europe and around the world
    5. 5. Collaborative Strategy: drivers • To expand cooperation in teaching to develop joint Master’s and Doctoral programmes, closely integrating the activities of some of our international partners • To grow Warwick’s visibility and positive impacts across sub-Saharan Africa • To invest in our core operation through commercial income growth and efficiency
    6. 6. Collaborative Policy “As a leading international institution with a strong reputation, Warwick encourages certain types of collaborative partnership where there is a demonstrable alignment to the collaborative strategy” and where specific criteria are met in terms of: • Academic matters • Classification and location of partner organisations
    7. 7. What has to be considered • Finance – Business case, demand • Teaching quality • Legal (duration, exit) • Immigration • Intellectual Property • Local regulatory environment in country • How is Warwick’s name being used?
    8. 8. Warwick’s approval processes • Departmental approval • In-principle (Strategic) Approval • Financial planning/approval • Academic approval – Risk assessment – Due diligence • Preparation of contract
    9. 9. Erasmus Mundus Courses developed out of existing research collaborations: • Joint Master’s in International Performance Research • Joint doctorate in Globalisation, Europe & Multilateralism • Joint Master’s in Complex Systems Science • Joint Master’s in Economic Development and Growth
    10. 10. Double Degree with the University of Konstanz • Built on a strong history of Erasmus student exchange at UG level • 2-year Master’s: year at Warwick replaces one year at Konstanz • Students benefit from studying from two different yet compatible perspectives in two of the top Political Science departments in Europe • Studying in two countries develops personal skills/experience and employability
    11. 11. Capacity building Ethiopia Project (Warwick Law School/Ethiopian Ministry of Education): • Aim 1: To create and establish within Northern Ethiopia a culture and a centre of excellence in legal research and postgraduate studies in law. • Aim 2: To develop the capacity of Northern Ethiopian law schools to conduct independent LL.M and PhD programmes after the project has come to an end.
    12. 12. Opportunities Collaborative courses: • can develop strategic partnerships (research; business/industry; capacity-building) • are attractive to students (although not always) • offer different/multiple perspectives • allow Warwick to position itself with strong international partners • raise profile and open up potential new markets • generate income growth and efficiency
    13. 13. Challenges • Navigating the diversity of TNE provision • Gathering intelligence (e.g. regulatory frameworks) • Marrying different legislative backgrounds • Whose robust quality assurance processes hold sway in a partnership of “equals”? • TNE partnerships understood on both sides (e.g. assessment and learning) • Conformity of degree structures (e.g. European PhD)
    14. 14. Risks (1) The route you take will depend on your appetite for risk and on your drivers for doing it: • Do the perceived benefits outweigh the (reputational/financial) risks? • Can local partners help mitigate the risk of contravening local legislation? • Robust process in place for setting up programmes? • Can you ensure you are rigorously managing your programmes and partners at a distance?
    15. 15. Risks (2) University of Wales pulls in its tentacles Times Higher Education, 4 October 2011 “The University of Wales has pulled degree accreditation from all courses except those designed and fully controlled by the institution. The decision, announced yesterday, comes after it was exposed as having suspect links to foreign colleges, including an institution run by a Malaysian pop star with bogus degrees. The move follows criticism from the Welsh education secretary who said the institution had let down Wales following the foreign accreditation scandal.”
    16. 16. Truisms? • A collaborative course by Warwick + University X is bound to attract students • A collaborative course is a great way of developing a relationship with another university • Our partner university will sort out everything in their country • We should always aim high - what about a 3- way degree?
    17. 17. Weighing up whether to do this • We have a duty of care to our students • We’re in this for the long-term – 10 year life cycle • Managing academic staff’s expectations: we should aim for the achievable • Is a collaborative programme the best way of collaborating? • National level agency agreements (e.g. QAA & TEQSA)?

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