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The Graduate Market in 2014 - Stephen Isherwood, Association of Graduate Recruiters
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The Graduate Market in 2014 - Stephen Isherwood, Association of Graduate Recruiters

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he Graduate Market in 2014 - Stephen Isherwood, Association of Graduate Recruiters

he Graduate Market in 2014 - Stephen Isherwood, Association of Graduate Recruiters

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    The Graduate Market in 2014 - Stephen Isherwood, Association of Graduate Recruiters The Graduate Market in 2014 - Stephen Isherwood, Association of Graduate Recruiters Presentation Transcript

    • ‘A Second Year of Growth’ The Graduate Market in 2014 Stephen Isherwood Chief Executive Association of Graduate Recruiters
    • Graduate vacancy changes 10.5% 4.3% -8.2% 1.7% 8.9% -8.9% 0.6% 12.7% 5.1% 5.1% 15.5% -3.4% -6.5% 14.6% 14.7% 2014 (predicted) 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000
    • Vacancies unfilled – in a recession! 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Percentage of graduate recruiters with unfilled vacancies Source: AGR Winter Surveys %
    • So why the shortfall? • Myths of the market – no vacancies • Perceptions of industries- particularly engineering • Short-term business changes • Skills shortages: electrical engineers, technology • Lack of “work ready skills”
    • UK graduate hiring • Degree discipline doesn’t always matter • UCAS tariff and degree grade part of the mix • UK recruitment practices more complex than elsewhere • University targeting an allocation of resources • Graduate hiring teams a cost centre
    • What does good look like? 1. An ability to work collaboratively with teams of people 2. Excellent communication skills: both speaking and listening 3. A high degree of drive and resilience 4. Ability to analyse make sense of complex situations 5. An ability to embrace multiple perspectives and challenge thinking 6. A capacity to develop new skills and behaviours according to role requirements 7. A high degree of self-awareness 8. An ability to negotiate and influence 9. An ability to form professional networks 10. Awareness of issues affecting sector applied to
    • What does good look like? • Practically intelligent problem solver • Can get things done with and through others • Passion to do the job • Resilient and flexible
    • A global mind-set How to get it: • Cross-cultural experience • Learn a new language • Travel/work/study abroad • Solve problems flexibly • Read the Economist What it isn’t: • Can’t work with different cultures • Has no interest in what is happening in other countries • Inflexible approach to work
    • Early targeting 77.3% 53.4% 30.7% 6.8% Internships Sandwich or industrial placements Work placements Other types of placements
    • Talent spotting • Shift in emphasis to talent spotting • Candidate processing outsourced • Campus brand building (ROI) • Early identification – Internships – One-year placements – First year spring weeks • Degree partnerships
    • Future trends • More competition • Increase in school-leaver opportunities • Talent spotting • Systemisation of HEAR
    • Competition returns Base population 735,000 Base GDP 2012 - £1,541,000m Source: Office for National Statistics 680 690 700 710 720 730 740 750 760 770 780 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 16-yr olds ('000s) 1400 1500 1600 1700 1800 1900 2000 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 GDP Projection (£bn)