Sarah Howls, HEFCE presentation on Higher Education and beyond: Widening participation beyond the student lifecycle

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Sarah Howls, HEFCE presentation on Higher Education and beyond: Widening participation beyond the student lifecycle

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Sarah Howls, HEFCE presentation on Higher Education and beyond: Widening participation beyond the student lifecycle

  1. 1. Welcome slide
  2. 2. Higher education and beyond Sarah Howls Woburn House 25th February 2014
  3. 3. Responding to strategic challenge Widening participation has to be about successful participation and successful participation means addressing student difference
  4. 4. What the data tells us Key reports: • • • • • Non-continuation rates at English HEIs (2013/07) Higher education and Beyond (2013/15) HE indicators for FECs (2013/18) Postgraduate education in England and NI (2013/14) Student Ethnicity (2010/13)
  5. 5. Staying in Which students are at most risk of withdrawing early?
  6. 6. Proportion of entrants who were no longer in HE after one year, from 2005-06 to 2010-11
  7. 7. Proportion of entrants who are no longer in HE after one year, by age on entry
  8. 8. Difference between the proportion of entrants who are no longer in HE after one year, and benchmark proportion, by sex
  9. 9. Difference between the proportion of entrants who are no longer in HE after one year, and benchmark proportion, by ethnic origin
  10. 10. Difference between the proportion of entrants who are no longer in HE after one year, and benchmark proportion, by disability status
  11. 11. Difference between the proportion of young entrants who are no longer in HE after one year, and benchmark proportion, by POLAR3 classification
  12. 12. Getting on Looking at attainment and progression
  13. 13. Qualification and progression outcomes across POLAR quintiles Percentage point difference of the outcome from the sector-adjusted average for each of the four outcomes, split by POLAR3 quintile
  14. 14. Qualification and progression outcomes for men and women Percentage point difference of the outcome from the sector-adjusted average for each of the four outcomes, split by sex
  15. 15. Qualification and progression outcomes for disabled students Percentage point difference of the outcome from the sector-adjusted average for the four outcomes, by disability status
  16. 16. Qualification and progression outcomes for ethnic minority groups Percentage point difference of the outcome from the sector-adjusted average for all four outcomes, split by ethnicity
  17. 17. Part-time matters Part-time study issues are complex and multi-faceted
  18. 18. Qualification outcomes 1 Outcomes of part-time first degree entrants in 1996-97 after 11 academic years Cohort UK HEIs (non-OU) Open University Total Still active on degree First degree awarded course Number of % of Number of % of entrants entrants entrants entrants No longer active Number of % of entrants entrants 6,490 39% 350 2% 9,745 59% 10,025 16,515 22% 26% 1,745 2,100 4% 3% 34,420 44,165 75% 70%
  19. 19. Intensity matters HEFCE and BIS research found completion rates differ between institutions and intensity of study HEFCE analysis (2009/18) found: • 44% of students studying at 30% intensity complete with 7 yrs • 18% of students studying below 30% intensity complete in 7 yrs • 63% of full-time students achieve 1st or upper second • 43% of part-time students achieve 1st or upper second
  20. 20. College-based HE Is the picture different?
  21. 21. Some key statistics for HE in FECs • Higher proportion of HE students than expected from LPNs (21 percent against sector adjusted average of 16.7 percent) • Non-continuation rate of 14 percent but this is against a sector adjusted average of 13.0 percent for registered and 13.3 percent of taught students in FECs • In 2010-11 proportion of degree qualifiers into work was 83.6 percent (compared to 90 percent in HEIs)
  22. 22. What should be done? At the heart of successful retention and success is a strong sense of belonging in HE for all students. Most effectively nurtured through mainstream activities that all students participate in. Academic programmes and high-quality student-centred learning and teaching must be a primary focus for effective student retention and success. Specific interventions cannot be recommended over and above each other. Rather the institution, department, programme and module should all nurture a culture of belonging through the way they function and relate to people. Source: Higher Education Academy: Building student engagement and belonging
  23. 23. How is it achieved? The HE Academy reports suggests Student belonging is achieved through: • Supportive peer relations • Meaningful interaction between staff and students • Developing knowledge, confidence and identity as successful HE learners • An HE experience relevant to students’ interests and future goals
  24. 24. And this should be guided by….. Principles for interventions • Mainstream • Proactive and developmental • Relevant • Well timed and appropriate media • Collaborative • Monitored
  25. 25. Key challenges and opportunities • Adopting student lifecycle approach = strategic approach • Understanding and responding to different needs of different groups • Engaging staff across institution • Senior management/governance as drivers • National strategy • Student engagement • Inclusive and responsive • Continuous improvement
  26. 26. Thank you for listening s.howls@hefce.ac.uk
  27. 27. How to find out more e-mail hefce@hefce.ac.uk Twitter http://twitter.com/hefce web-site www.hefce.ac.uk admin-hefce e-mail distribution list HEFCE update, our monthly e-newsletter

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