WHAT IS SOCIAL INNOVATION?
And why should universities be interested?
Sylvia Wyatt
January 2014
Summary.....
What is social innovation?

The social innovation journey
Why should universities be interested?
• evidence g...
Definition of a social innovation
Social innovation is a new idea (product, service or model) that
simultaneously meet soc...
What is social innovation?
A journey, often taking many years
Umbrella term- comprises many
small innovations or social
en...
Social innovation categories
Environmental
innovation
•Homes
•Buildings
•Communities
•Green spaces

Cultural innovation
•R...
Social innovation mechanisms
Incremental
Radical
Transformative
Disruptive
Reverse

Some innovations have
unintended conse...
Social innovation journey

Learning from NESTA, In and Out of Sync
Slide 7

The Young Foundation 2012
Each innovation has a unique journey

Slide 8

The Young Foundation 2012
Example: Language Line
• Language Line started as a charity in 1990 by Michael Young
• It provided free telephone interpre...
Language line

Outcomes/key points

• International and
commercial success
• 250% ROI
• Problems orientated
Challenges
199...
The social innovation journey

Slide 11
The social innovation journey
• Spiral = framework
for systematic
thinking.
• It is not an exact
science, nor are
stages a...
Stage 1: Defining the real problem
•Clear diagnosis of a ‘wicked’
problem
•Inter and intra organisational
collaboration
•O...
Stage 2: Developing the proposal
Ideas need shaping
Demonstrate relative benefit
Risk taking
Identify incentives to partic...
Stage 3: Testing, Visible Proof
Trial-ability
Grades of evidence
Types of evidence
ROI (financial)
SROI (social)
EROI (env...
Stage 4: Sustaining
Choosing the right variant
‘Effective demand’ &‘effective
supply’
Social purpose v financial interests...
Stage 5: Adoption and spread
Simple, modular and high
quality ideas grow more quickly
Spread differs between private
and p...
Adoption and spread models

LOW

control over what, who and where

Uncontrolled
diffusion

Directed diffusion Takeover or
...
Stage 6: Systemic innovation
Made up of smaller innovations
Hostility of the older order
Changing mindsets and attitudes –...
Stage 6: Systemic change

Individual small scale innovations

Social
innovation

Changes to attitudes and mindsets

Change...
Example: Increasing care outside hospital
Maximise care at
home with
support for carers

Reduce avoidable
unscheduled
even...
48 High Impact Changes – granularity is important
Enhance
Rehabilitation
informal carer
and
capacity
enablement

Community...
Engagement with stakeholders
Public and patients

Carers
Enhance
Rehabilitation
informal carer
and
capacity
enablement

So...
Assessing Impact
Enhance
Rhabilitation
informal carer
and
capacity
reablement
Existing
housing,
equipment &
adaptations

E...
‘Best’ innovations 20/48
Enhance
Rehabilitation
informal carer
and
capacity
reablement

Community
urgent
response
systems
...
Social Innovation and Universities
•Generating evidence
•Capacity development
•Impact and growth

Slide 26
The literature – gaps and coverage
Mostly describes individual project development pathways
Adoption and spread is least w...
Generating evidence
•What works and why....
•How to measure impact – ROI, SROI, EROI
•Emphasis on qualitative approaches t...
Building capacity

Slide 29
Who is involved?

Evidence
creators

Innovators

Implementers
Rapid capacity building
Few formal courses
New skills for social innovation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

Problem definition ( ethnolog...
Impact and growth

Slide 32
Impact and growth
Whitty and growth sectors for innovation
Looking in:
• REF
• Measuring Social, Environmental and Economi...
Choosing effective innovations
.

•Strategic fit
•Health benefits
•Cost effectiveness
•Implementation

Slide 34
Impact v Risk
Identifying risk is essential in identifying if and why investors will be drawn to
an innovation. Low risk h...
Social Impact Bonds - Accessing finance
A financial mechanism that encourages investors to fund preventative
programmes to...
Ingredients for successful social innovations
1. Good people and good ideas
2. Strategic fit – go with the grain
3. Measur...
Questions?
Sylvia Wyatt
07786510222
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0 Introduction to Social Innovation – What is it? What is the landscape? Why is it
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Sylvia Wyatt, Principal Advisor, The Young Foundation

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Sylvia Wyatt - What is social innovation? And why should universities be interested?

  1. 1. WHAT IS SOCIAL INNOVATION? And why should universities be interested? Sylvia Wyatt January 2014
  2. 2. Summary..... What is social innovation? The social innovation journey Why should universities be interested? • evidence generation • capacity development • Impact and growth 2
  3. 3. Definition of a social innovation Social innovation is a new idea (product, service or model) that simultaneously meet social needs and create new social relationships or collaborations. In other words, social innovations enhancer both societal capital and society’s capacity to act. Source: Young Foundation and Nesta 3
  4. 4. What is social innovation? A journey, often taking many years Umbrella term- comprises many small innovations or social enterprises Very broad and without boundaries Future focused and risky Addresses ‘wicked’ societal problems Evidence of impact scarce Crosses sector boundaries – best ideas at interfaces High failure rate of small innovations 4
  5. 5. Social innovation categories Environmental innovation •Homes •Buildings •Communities •Green spaces Cultural innovation •Relationships •Ways of working •Social rules & norms Technological innovation •Digital/IT •Drugs •Devices
  6. 6. Social innovation mechanisms Incremental Radical Transformative Disruptive Reverse Some innovations have unintended consequences! 6
  7. 7. Social innovation journey Learning from NESTA, In and Out of Sync Slide 7 The Young Foundation 2012
  8. 8. Each innovation has a unique journey Slide 8 The Young Foundation 2012
  9. 9. Example: Language Line • Language Line started as a charity in 1990 by Michael Young • It provided free telephone interpreting services to organisations working with vulnerable people. • It proved very successful and became a for-profit operation. • Secured funds to expand and recruit professional managers. • Bought 2x by venture capitalists (latest £24 million deal). • Failed to expand into Germany( many German public organisations believed that immigrants should learn German). • Scaled through organisational growth and eventual merger Slide 9
  10. 10. Language line Outcomes/key points • International and commercial success • 250% ROI • Problems orientated Challenges 1990/1 1992 1995 1996 1998 1999 2001 • Rapid expansion + diversification • Recruit and retain staff • Failure in Germany Slide 10
  11. 11. The social innovation journey Slide 11
  12. 12. The social innovation journey • Spiral = framework for systematic thinking. • It is not an exact science, nor are stages always discrete. • Why is the usual success rate under10%? Slide 12
  13. 13. Stage 1: Defining the real problem •Clear diagnosis of a ‘wicked’ problem •Inter and intra organisational collaboration •Open accessible data •Ethnographic research •Co-design •Media spotlighting Examples: global warming, obesity, child 13 poverty
  14. 14. Stage 2: Developing the proposal Ideas need shaping Demonstrate relative benefit Risk taking Identify incentives to participate Sources of ideas -Positive deviance -Borrowing from alternative worlds -At the boundaries of sectors or organisations -Creative reflection -Bundling existing ideas together Example: Long Term Care Revolution 14 sandpit
  15. 15. Stage 3: Testing, Visible Proof Trial-ability Grades of evidence Types of evidence ROI (financial) SROI (social) EROI (environmental) Ideas need testing iteratively Methods of testing -Public Feedback -Plan Do Study Act PDSA cycles -Oiloting -Rapid prototyping -Trials and RCTs 15
  16. 16. Stage 4: Sustaining Choosing the right variant ‘Effective demand’ &‘effective supply’ Social purpose v financial interests Building coalitions, networks.... Becoming a (social) enterprise; • Organisational form • Accountability • Business model Financial capital – funders need to share innovation goals Build social capital – key but difficult 16
  17. 17. Stage 5: Adoption and spread Simple, modular and high quality ideas grow more quickly Spread differs between private and public systems Copying can be difficult Need to measure change/impact Possible metrics •Social and financial impact (for funders) •Internal management (for social enterprise) •Understanding long term change 17
  18. 18. Adoption and spread models LOW control over what, who and where Uncontrolled diffusion Directed diffusion Takeover or system by ‘parent’ emulation by organisation more • Promotion through powerful formal networks organisation HIGH Organisation al growth • Licensing • Federation • Franchising Social purpose Commercial purpose Slide 18 7 The Young Foundation 2012 The Young Foundation 2010 Slide Based on ‘In and Out of Sync’ 2003
  19. 19. Stage 6: Systemic innovation Made up of smaller innovations Hostility of the older order Changing mindsets and attitudes – campaigns, policy influencing Changing infrastructure Changing legislation and regulation Often speeded up by a crisis (?economic) Need to create a new context to ensure that constituent innovations thrive •transforming household waste handling •Telephone communications 19
  20. 20. Stage 6: Systemic change Individual small scale innovations Social innovation Changes to attitudes and mindsets Changes in public, voluntary & private sectors crisis New technologies and supply chains New ways of delivering services with new skills Care outside hospital Changes in legislation and regulation 20
  21. 21. Example: Increasing care outside hospital Maximise care at home with support for carers Reduce avoidable unscheduled events Better integrated health & social care. Improve capacity & flow Better use non medical practitioners Improve remote and rural services Improve EOL care Enhance unpaid carer capacity a Enhance unpaid carer capacity Enhance unpaid carer capacity Use tele-medicine & tele-health t Enhance unpaid carer capacity and support Enhance unpaid carer capacity a Enhance unpaid carer More investment into improvement in existing housing, More investment into improvement in existing housing, More investment into improvement in existing housing, Develop more near patient testing Use tele-care to provide 24/7 risk management, Use tele-care to provide 24/7 risk management, More investment into existing housing, More extra care (new) houses More extra care (new) houses More extra care (new) houses Improve referral management by Use tele-medicine & tele-health to support care delivery Use tele-medicine & tele- More extra care (new) houses Redesign home care services Use tele-care to provide 24/7 risk management, Redesign home care Understand and reduce variation in health and social care Multi-disciplinary extended community teams Anticipatory care and crisis prevention. Redesign home care services Use tele-care to provide 24/7 risk management, Use tele-medicine & tele-health to support care delivery Use tele-care to provide 24/7 risk management, Redesign care pathways to optimise capacity Single 24/7 point of contact for local information and access to community services Multi-disciplinary extended community teams Use tele-care to provide 24/7 risk management, Use tele-medicine & tele-health to support care delivery Anticipatory care and crisis prevention. Use tele-medicine & tele-health to support care delivery Reduce pre-operative beddays Overnight response for people in need Robust community emergency and urgent response systems Use tele-medicine & tele-health Self directed support Case manager or key worker to coordinate personalised care Self directed support Improve quality of health & social care Expand intermediate level services to provide alternatives to admission to acute hospitals Develop more near patient testing Self directed support More domiciliary assessment and rehabilitation Single 24/7 point of contact for local information Anticipatory care and crisis prevention. Change referral permissions so that people can self refer Robust community emergency and urgent response systems Better community transport More domiciliary assessment and rehabi Anticipatory care and crisis prevention. Overnight response for people in need Case manager or key worker Screening, consultation & treatment by NMAP Develop more near patient testing Voluntary sector organisations contributions Anticipatory care and crisis prevention. Case manager or key worker to coordinate personalised care Expand intermediate level services to provide alternatives to admission Multi-disciplinary extended community teams including carers and users. Equitable funding for each CHP Integrated equipment library and adaptations service Mentoring, peer support/ expert patients to encourage self-care Case manager or key worker Single 24/7 point of contact for local information Robust community emergency and urgent response systems Single 24/7 point of contact for local information Better medicines management by pharmacists Co location of services and teams across agencies Multi-disciplinary extended community teams Overnight response for people in need Integrated equipment library Overnight response for people in need Redesign care pathways Improve referral management Overnight response Develop more near patient testing Joint targeting of resources towards those people who are at risk Expand intermediate level services Improve quality and standardisation of routine health & social care through use of protocols Redesign care pathways to optimise capacity Expand intermediate level services Integrated equipment library and adaptations service Voluntary sector organisations contributions Robust community emergency and urgent response systems Non medical prescribing within protocols for common conditions Electronic prescribing and postal dispensing Develop more near patient testing Self-held personal care plans/records Continuity of information. Better community transport Change referral permissions Mobile services Integrated equipment User participation in care planning Better medicines management by pharmacists Integrated equipment library and adaptations service Screening, consultation & treatment by non medical practitioners Obligate networks between remote and rural areas and larger centres User participation in care planning Joint targeting of resources towards those people who are at risk Understand and reduce variation in health and social care Self-held personal care plans/records Better access to psycho-social support Equitable funding for each CHP Voluntary sector organisations Voluntary sector organisations contributions Screening, consultation & treatment by non medical practitioners User participation in care planning Integrated services across health and social care with single point of access Continuity of information. Mentoring, peer support/ expert patients to encourage self-care Community based one stop shops/ ‘fast’ clinics Joint targeting of Community based one stop shops/ ‘fast’ clinics Increase clinical and social networks Better medicines management by pharmacists Mobile services to support community hospitals Voluntary sector organisations contributions Equitable funding for each CHP community including acute hospital costs Redesign care pathways to optimise capacity Redesign care pathways to optimise capacity Plan EOL care with family and carers with particular focus on last 48 hrs Continuity of information across organisational boundaries. Non medical prescribing within protocols Non medical prescribing within protocols for common conditions Develop community hospitals/local care centres/hubs Increase clinical and social network effectiveness Better access to psycho-social support Electronic prescribing and postal dispensing Equitable funding for each CHP Mentoring, peer support/ expert patients to encourage self-care Extend gold standard EOL care to everyone Plan EOL care with family and carers with particular focus on last 48 hrs Align health and social care terms and conditions of service Plan EOL care with family and carers Develop multi-skilled generic workers working across organisations Co location of services and teams across agencies Equitable funding for each CHP Equitable funding for each CHP Better management of age transitions Better medicines management by pharmacists Understand and reduce variation in health and social care Redesign care pathways to optimise capacity Improve quality of routine health & social care Non medical prescribing within protocols Better access to psycho-social support with single point of access Community based one stop shops/ ‘fast’ clinics Mobile services Plan EOL care with family and carers Develop community hospitals/local care centres/hubs Pool budgets between health and social care Develop multi-skilled generic
  22. 22. 48 High Impact Changes – granularity is important Enhance Rehabilitation informal carer and capacity enablement Community urgent response systems Voluntary Better sector pharmaceutic organisations al care Self referral Obligate networks Existing housing, equipment & adaptations Anticipatory care and crisis prevention Near patient testing Electronic records and shared information Referral management Extending non-med professional roles Better EOL and palliative care for all Extra care houses Case manager Personalised care Community transport Clinical & Social Networks Understand and reduce variation Psycho-social support Plan EOL care with family and carers Redesign home care Extended community teams Integrated equipment & adaptation service Single point Mentoring & Redesign care of access to Local care peer support pathways care centres / hubs pathways Telecare 24/7 risk management Single 24/7 point of contact Self-held personal care plans Reduce perioperative One stop shop beddays Integrated budgets participation in care planning Quality and Innovative standardisatio prescribing & n of routine access to care medication Generic workers Overnight Tele-medicine response for & tele-health people in need Self directed support Intermediate level alternatives Sylvia Wyatt User SPACE lead for SBC Resources aligned to care pathways Co location Better management of transitions Non medical prescribing Mobile services Aligned financial incentives
  23. 23. Engagement with stakeholders Public and patients Carers Enhance Rehabilitation informal carer and capacity enablement Social care Extra care houses Self referral Obligate networks Better EOL and palliative care for all Plan EOL care with family and carers Near patient testing Electronic records and shared information Referral management Extending non-med professional roles Case manager Personalised care Community transport Clinical & Social Networks Understand and reduce variation Psycho-social support Extended community teams Integrated equipment & adaptation service Telecare 24/7 risk management Single 24/7 point of contact Self-held personal care plans Reduce perioperative One stop shop beddays User participation in care planning Co location Quality and Innovative standardisatio prescribing & n of routine access to care medication Generic workers Resources aligned to care pathways Better management of transitions Non medical practitioners Integrated budgets Overnight Tele-medicine response for & tele-health people in need Local authorities Anticipatory care and crisis prevention Voluntary Better sector pharmaceutic organisations al care Redesign home care Community providers Existing housing, equipment & adaptations Community urgent response systems Housing Self directed support Intermediate level alternatives Third sector Mentoring & Redesign care peer support pathways Non medical prescribing Single point of access to Local care care centres / hubs pathways Mobile services Community Transport GPs Acute care Aligned financial incentives
  24. 24. Assessing Impact Enhance Rhabilitation informal carer and capacity reablement Existing housing, equipment & adaptations Extra care houses Redesign home care Telecare 24/7 risk management Community urgent response systems Voluntary Better sector pharmaceutic organisations al care Self referral Obligate networks Breadth of impact Community Enhance Rehabilitation Voluntary Better Anticipatory Electronic Extending urgent Obligate Improved EOL informal carer and sector pharmaceutic Self referral care and Near patient records& Referral non-med response networks & palliative capacity reablement organisations al care crisis testing shared systems management professional care prevention information roles Existing Anticipatory Electronic Extending Community Improved EOL Enhance Voluntary non-med Better housing, care and NearRehabilitation patient records & Case urgent Referral Obligate Clinical & and Understand EOL & pallaitiev informal carer sector Plan pharmaceutic Self referral equipment crisis testing shared management professional manager - & Community Psycho-social response networks and with capacity Social reablement reduce organisations family care care for all al Personalised adaptations transport prevention information roles systemssupport Networks variation and carers care Case Existing Anticipatory Electronic Extending Clinical & Understand Plan EOL care Community Improved EOL Enhance Rehabilitation records & Voluntary Better Extra care manager housing,Community and Social patient reduce Psycho-social with family care Near Referral non-med and Extended Integrated Single point urgent & palliative informal carer houses Personalised Mentoring & Redesign careand transport support Local management pharmaceutic Self referral caresector equipment & crisis Networks of access response testing variation shared professional and carers community equipment & in care for all capacity reablement information /organisations al care care peer pathways centres hubs adaptations suppor prevention roles systems teams adaptations care pathway Number of people Evidence that it works Obligate networks Case Existing Anticipatory El;ectronic Extending Extended Integrated Clinical & Understand Plan EOL care Better EOL Redesign point Local care Extra managerMentoring & and housing, care Redesign care Single record and Psycho-social Near patient Referral non-med community care equipment & Reduce Community Single 24/7 Self-held preSocial of access and reduce with family and palliative home care peer transport centres / support hubs houses adaptations operative crisis pathways Personalised & suppor One stop shop Integrated equipment testing shared management professional teams point of personal care Networks variation and carers care for all budgets care beddays adaptations prevention information roles contact plans CaseReduce preSingle point Telecare 24/7 Single 24/7 Self-held Clinical & Understand Plan EOL care Extended Integrated Overnight User Redesign Quality and Innovative manager - Mentoring & stop shop care of access in Psycho-social Community Redesign Integrated Local care risk point of personal Extra care equipment operative care One and community & Tele-medicine response for participation care standardisatio prescribing &suppor Generic Social budgetsreduce centres / hubs with family Personalised peer transport support home Co location houses pathways care management contact plans beddays Networks variation and carers teams of routine adaptations & tele-health people in in care n workers careaccess to pathways need planning care medication Overnight User QualityIntegrated and Innovative Extended Single point Telecare participation Self-held Tele-medicine Resourcesfor 24/7 Single 24/7 response standardisatio prescribing & pre- Redesign care Generic Redesign equipment & Reduce Mentoring & Local care Integrated Intermediate Better point of Co location care aligned community of access to operative workers & tele-health aligned to risk people in in care access to suppor One stop shop Self directed Non medical Mobileadaptation home care personal n of routine peer pathways budgets centres / hubs level management financial teams care pathway management contact plans services servicemedication beddays need planning care support care prescribing alternatives of transitions incentives pathways Align Overnight Better User 24/7 Quality and Align Innovative Telecare 24/7 Single Self-held Reduce periIntermediate Integrated Self directed resources to for participation Non Mobile Tele-medicine response management of medical care standardisatio prescribing & OneGeneric risk point personal operative stop shop level financial Co locationservices budgets support & tele-health care people in transitions prescribing in care n of routine access to workers management contact plans beddays alternatives of resources pathways need planning care medication Self directed support Overnight User Quality and Innovative Align Intermediate Better Align Tele-medicine response for participation standardisatio prescribing & Co medical resources to Non location Mobile level financial & tele-health people in management in care n of routine access to care prescribing services need planning care medication alternatives of transitions incentives pathways Self directed support Intermediate level alternatives Resources aligned to care pathways Better management of transitions Non medical prescribing Mobile services Generic workers Aligned finacial incentives Scalability
  25. 25. ‘Best’ innovations 20/48 Enhance Rehabilitation informal carer and capacity reablement Community urgent response systems Role of voluntary sector Better pharmaceutic al care Self referral Extending Improved non-med EOL and professional palliative care roles for all Obligate referral networks Housing, equipment & adaptations Anticipatory care and crisis prevention Near patient testing electronic record and shared information Referral management Extra care houses Case manager for Personalising care Community transport Clinical & Social Networks Understand and reduce variation Redesign home care Extended community teams Integrated equipment & adaptation service Mentoring & Single point peer support Redesign care Local care of access in dependent pathways centres / hubs care pathway people Telecare 24/7 Single 24/7 point of contact Self-held personal care plans Reduce perioperative One stop shop beddays e-health Overnight response for people in need User participation in care planning Self directed support Intermediate level alternatives Resources aligned to care pathways Psycho-social support Plan EOL care with family and carers Integrated budgets Sylvia Wyatt SPACE lead for SBC Innovative Quality & Co location Better management of transitions standardisatio prescribing & n of routine access to care medication Non medical prescribing Mobile services Generic workers Aligned financial incentives
  26. 26. Social Innovation and Universities •Generating evidence •Capacity development •Impact and growth Slide 26
  27. 27. The literature – gaps and coverage Mostly describes individual project development pathways Adoption and spread is least well understood Confusing evidence about implement-ability Need better feedback loops to people and patients (Big data) Poor quality evidence about impact of social care innovations Health and care innovations: •Patchy (but doctor-proof) evidence about safety and effectiveness. •Pharma innovation is well understood and regulated •Med tec – limited evidence often generated by idea owners (SMEs) 27
  28. 28. Generating evidence •What works and why.... •How to measure impact – ROI, SROI, EROI •Emphasis on qualitative approaches to defining the problem – ethnography •New cross sector disciplines eg implementation science And Evaluation, evaluation, evaluation 28
  29. 29. Building capacity Slide 29
  30. 30. Who is involved? Evidence creators Innovators Implementers
  31. 31. Rapid capacity building Few formal courses New skills for social innovation • • • • • • • • Problem definition ( ethnology) Pitching ( Dragon’s Den) Co-design and co-production Social design Marketing and amplifying messages Measuring impact ( social, economic and environmental) Knowledge exchange mechanisms Building communities of interest/networking 31
  32. 32. Impact and growth Slide 32
  33. 33. Impact and growth Whitty and growth sectors for innovation Looking in: • REF • Measuring Social, Environmental and Economic impacts Looking Out: • Local impact via LEPs • Operationalising Corporate Social Responsibility • Linking innovation, education and health care ( AHSNs) • Social impact bonds 33
  34. 34. Choosing effective innovations . •Strategic fit •Health benefits •Cost effectiveness •Implementation Slide 34
  35. 35. Impact v Risk Identifying risk is essential in identifying if and why investors will be drawn to an innovation. Low risk high impact ventures are the most likely to appeal to commercial investors. Meanwhile higher risks may be endured by government agencies with a vested interest in improving social outcomes:
  36. 36. Social Impact Bonds - Accessing finance A financial mechanism that encourages investors to fund preventative programmes to tackle social problems, so reducing future public expenditure and freeing up resources to pay back the original investor Areas: criminal justice, youth worklessness, housing and health. A programme of actions • Finance from philanthropists • Local authorities • Commercial markets • Charities Raising a sum for investment Slide 36 • Preventative programme of action, implemented by a consortium with a lead organisation or a Special Purpose Vehicle • Commitment to repay the initial investment on achieving agreed outcomes from the benefitting Government Department • Benchmarked against a control group-, and separated from “environmental” risk factors A commitment to repay http://www.youngfoundation.org/our-work/advising-public-service-innovation/social-impactbonds/social-impact-bonds
  37. 37. Ingredients for successful social innovations 1. Good people and good ideas 2. Strategic fit – go with the grain 3. Measurable relative advantage Observ-ability / Trail-ability 4. Robust evidence of safety and effectiveness 5. Promoted by opinion leaders 6. Marketing – social media, shoe leather 7. Effective demand - pull 8. Transferability, re-invention and copying 9. Use existing Infrastructure 10.Compatibility/disruption = ease of implementation 11.Organisational risk tolerance
  38. 38. Questions? Sylvia Wyatt 07786510222

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