Revitalising the flexible
learning offer:
A typology to support portfolio design, recruitment, outreach, transition and en...
Part time, flexible learning = ‘Cinderella Operation’

Objectives:
Are part-time, flexible
learners a missed
opportunity f...
Conceptual Framework:
Typology & the Learner Journey

the Individual:
characteristics & needs
- Learner Attributes
- Flexi...
Defining Flexible Part-time Learning

The HEA (2011),
defines the dimensions of
flexible learning as:

Pace:
Volume of cre...
The Market for Part-Time Flexible Learners
Identifying learners: who are they?
 One third of all undergraduates study par...
Background & Trends
 Dramatic national decline in part-time learner
recruitment – 40 % since 2010
 The 2012/13 reforms o...
Towards Developing a Typology of Part-time
Flexible Learners

Learner
Attributes

Flexible
Learning Offer

Style of
Learni...
Towards Developing a Typology- Research
Sources:

Author

Date

Title

Publisher

Callender, C., Mason,
G., & Jamieson, A....
Typology:
9. Employer
work-force
development

Characteristics & Needs
1. Returners to HE

2. Career Builders

8. Decelerat...
Managing the Learner Journey:
Through a WP Lens

Outreach

Engagement

Transition

Support

Destination
Managing the Learner Journey: WP Intensity/Outreach

A large proportion of learners seeking
flexibility are mature, but t...
Managing the Learner Journey: Engagement


Participation projections suggest an
increase among 22- 30 year olds, but dimi...
Managing the Learner Journey: Transition Needs


Bridging programmes are important for
successful transition (Buckler, 20...
Managing the Learner Journey: On-course Support


Lack of research on the needs of older
learners in relation to curricul...
Managing the Learner Journey: Destination


Mature students perform at least as well
as younger students. Younger matures...
Impacts:
Institutional Perspective:
 Understand characteristics of potential
learners
 Assess suitability of portfolio b...
Enablers:










Gather robust evidence base and case studies of impact
Calculate the value of each segment
De...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Understanding and responding to the needs of different types of part-time students

410 views

Published on

Debi Hayes, Deputy Provost, Greenwich School of Management

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
410
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
71
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Understanding and responding to the needs of different types of part-time students

  1. 1. Revitalising the flexible learning offer: A typology to support portfolio design, recruitment, outreach, transition and enhancement of the student experience Presented by: Debi Hayes: Deputy Provost GSM London
  2. 2. Part time, flexible learning = ‘Cinderella Operation’ Objectives: Are part-time, flexible learners a missed opportunity for universities? Yes, but they require a greater understanding and a tailored approach!  Identify the structure of the HE flexible learning market and the dynamics and drivers shaping its development  Construct a typographical framework (ex-post methodology), combining learner attributes (attitudes, motivations, perceived barriers), study requirements and aspirations  Maximise participation for each identified group by developing routes to market providing a flexible portfolio offer, together with a differentiated marketing and outreach strategy  Propose engagement and support arrangements for each identified typology through the learner life-cycle to maximise professional development and engagement
  3. 3. Conceptual Framework: Typology & the Learner Journey the Individual: characteristics & needs - Learner Attributes - Flexible Learning Offer - Style of Learning - Brand Proposition the Institution: learner journey - WP Intensity/Outreach - Engagement - Transition Needs - On-course Support - Destination
  4. 4. Defining Flexible Part-time Learning The HEA (2011), defines the dimensions of flexible learning as: Pace: Volume of credit APEL & APCL Creative use of credit frameworks Mode: Learning technology as a driver Distance & blended & attendance Synchronous/ Asynchronous Place: Work-based versus Home versus Institution
  5. 5. The Market for Part-Time Flexible Learners Identifying learners: who are they?  One third of all undergraduates study parttime. This equals over half a million learners  61% are over 29 when they commence UG studies with 10% under 21  Vocational programmes account for 63% of students Approximately 300,000 part-time learners are on taught and research postgraduate qualifications  Much more heterogeneous & diverse with respect to entry qualifications than full-time learners  More unequally distributed – remain concentrated in a number of HEI’s in certain regions
  6. 6. Background & Trends  Dramatic national decline in part-time learner recruitment – 40 % since 2010  The 2012/13 reforms of part-time higher education funding in England have not been clearly communicated  Decline in employer support since 2008  Mature learners are loan risk averse  Demise of LLNs and WP rarely focuses on mature learners  University complacency, PT = ‘Cinderella Operation’ and lack of buy in at top  Funding Administration and pricing systems lack flexibility Impact:  Failure to deliver on the England skills agenda/targets  Disproportionate impact on learner's with a widening participation profile
  7. 7. Towards Developing a Typology of Part-time Flexible Learners Learner Attributes Flexible Learning Offer Style of Learning (LA) (FLO) (SL) Brand Proposition (BP)
  8. 8. Towards Developing a Typology- Research Sources: Author Date Title Publisher Callender, C., Mason, G., & Jamieson, A. 2010 The supply of part‐time higher education in the UK London: Universities UK, Callender, C., Wilkinson, D. 2012 Futuretrack: part-time higher education students – the benefits of higher education after three years of study HECSU Manchester Chilvers, D. 2008 Segmentation of adults by attitudes towards learning and barriers to learning London: DIUS HEFCE 2013 Higher Education in England Impact of the 2012 reforms HEFCE, Higher Education Academy Evidence Net 2009 Mature students in higher education and issues for widening participation The Higher Education Academy Maguire, D. 2013 Flexible Learning: Wrapping higher education around the needs of part-time students HEPI OU 2011 Monitor Segmentation Study OU Tallantyre, F. 2012 Flexible Learning Summit The Higher Education Academy
  9. 9. Typology: 9. Employer work-force development Characteristics & Needs 1. Returners to HE 2. Career Builders 8. Decelerators Typology of Flexible Learners 3. Second Chancers 7. Trailists 6. Personal Developers Nine typologies have been identified according to a number of learner attributes 4. Re-Trainers 5. Earners & Learners Discussion Document: Table 1
  10. 10. Managing the Learner Journey: Through a WP Lens Outreach Engagement Transition Support Destination
  11. 11. Managing the Learner Journey: WP Intensity/Outreach  A large proportion of learners seeking flexibility are mature, but the terminology is ill defined (HEA)  Limitations of statistics from UCAS make it difficult to compare WP data with that of school leavers (HESA, 2008)  Lack of Institutional focus on WP for mature learners (Bowl, 2003)  Mature students cite geographically accessible institution; structure of course; APEL arrangements as the three considerations (Davies, 2002) Discussion Document: Table 2  Limited opportunities for IAG and mature learners do not usually access careers fairs (Conner, 1999)
  12. 12. Managing the Learner Journey: Engagement  Participation projections suggest an increase among 22- 30 year olds, but diminishing over 30 (Bekhardnia, 2007)  Institutional change is required to deal with older learners who are often more demanding and discerning (Rammell, 2008)  Barriers to access for mature learners are best described as dispositional, situational and institutional (Fuller and Pattern, 2007) Discussion Document: Table 2
  13. 13. Managing the Learner Journey: Transition Needs  Bridging programmes are important for successful transition (Buckler, 2006)  Lack of research on the needs of older learners in relation to curriculum structure or pedagogical approach Discussion Document: Table 2
  14. 14. Managing the Learner Journey: On-course Support  Lack of research on the needs of older learners in relation to curriculum structure or pedagogical approach  Mature learners are critical of HE when support is inadequate (May, 2001)  Mature learners are less likely than younger learners to withdraw because of problems of social integration (Yorke and Longden, 2008) Discussion Document: Table 2
  15. 15. Managing the Learner Journey: Destination  Mature students perform at least as well as younger students. Younger matures (21-24) are most likely to experience difficulties (Baxter & Hatt,1999)  Older mature graduates (over 30) are most likely to experience difficulty in accessing graduate employment (Brennan and Shah, 2003)
  16. 16. Impacts: Institutional Perspective:  Understand characteristics of potential learners  Assess suitability of portfolio by classification and identify gaps in provision  Develop compelling brand propositions that resonate with each classification Societal Learner Institutional Learner perspective:  Search process could be simplified and uniform  More focussed and targeted offer with appropriate levels of support Societal:  Regional/national skills agenda  Business improvement impacts  Health and well being
  17. 17. Enablers:          Gather robust evidence base and case studies of impact Calculate the value of each segment Develop relationships with intermediaries to connect with identified learners Develop a strategic overview and institutional commitment Consider amending administrative systems, funding mechanisms and pricing Establish coherence with mission strategy Identify the need for cultural change Differentiate support for mature/flexible learners and manage expectations Review curriculum and with an emphasis on agility and the creative use of credit frameworks

×