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Heroes villians archetypes speaker chris huntlley

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Heroes Villians Archetypes Speaker Chris Huntlley …

Heroes Villians Archetypes Speaker Chris Huntlley


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  • 1. Heroes, Villians & Dramatica Archetypes Speaker: Chris Huntley
  • 2. Overview• A Few Character Problems• Eight Character Archetypes• Complex Characters• Heroes and Main Characters• Villains and Impact Characters
  • 3. Typical CharacterDevelopment Problems• I want a main character who is NOT a hero.• My characters are little more that set decoration. How can I make them essential to the story?• My characters are too simple. How can I give them greater dimensionality? Make them more “real?”
  • 4. Simple Characters: Eight Archetypes Protagonist Antagonist Reason Emotion Sidekick Skeptic Guardian Contagonist
  • 5. Archetypes in Star WarsProtagonist Luke SkywalkerAntagonist The Empire Emotion Chewbacca Reason Princess Leia Skeptic Han Solo Sidekick R2D2 & C3P0 Guardian Obi WanContagonist Darth Vader
  • 6. 16 Character Motivations Decision Element Action ElementProtagonist Consider PursueAntagonist Reconsider Avoid Emotion Feeling Uncontrolled Reason Logic Control Skeptic Disbelief Oppose Sidekick Faith Support Guardian Conscience HelpContagonist Temptation Hinder
  • 7. 16 Character Motivations Decision Element Action ElementLuke Skywalker Consider Pursue The Empire Reconsider Avoid Chewbacca Feeling Uncontrolled Princess Leia Logic Control Han Solo Disbelief Oppose R2D2 & C3P0 Faith Support Obi Wan Conscience Help Darth Vader Temptation Hinder
  • 8. 16 Character Motivations Decision Element Action Element Dorothy Consider PursueWicked Witch Reconsider Avoid Tin Man Feeling Uncontrolled Scarecrow Logic ControlCowardly Lion Disbelief Oppose Toto Faith Support Glinda Conscience HelpWizard of Oz Temptation Hinder
  • 9. Complex Characters• Complex Characters containaone or more problem-solving elements in non- archetypal arrangement.• Simple Example: Achetypal “swap”the Tin Man Wizard of Oz—The Scarecrow and in The
  • 10. Main Character vs. Protagonist• Main Character: The Character through whom the audience experiences the story.• Protagonist: The Character who is the prime mover and principle proponent of the Story Goal in the overall story.
  • 11. “Hero” Characters• Heroes are most often BOTH the Main Character and the Protagonist.• Many stories, however, separate the role of the Protagonist from the perspective of the Main Character.• Can you think of some examples where the Main Character is NOT the protagonist?
  • 12. Examples• Sherlock Holmes stories: Sherlock Holmes is the protagonist; Watson is the Main Character.• Hellboy (Movie)—Hellboy is the protagonist; Idealistic and naive agent John Myers is the Main Character.• The Terminator—Kyle Reese is the protagonist; Sarah Connor is the Main Character.
  • 13. Impact Characters vs. Antagonists• A Protagonist is balanced by an Antagonist• Antagonists are against the story goal• A Main Character has personal issues and is challenged by an Impact Character• The Impactway of solving personalan alternative Character represents issues
  • 14. “Villain” Characters• Villain usually describes the Antagonist• A Villain can both the Impact Character and the Antagonist• But, like the Hero, a Villain can be complex• Anime examples...
  • 15. Heroes and Villains Example: Dragonball Z (1999) The
main
and
impact
characters
are
used
in
the
most
simple
and
basic
way.

They
 sustain
a
ba6le
for
more
than
a
dozen
episodes
that
culminates
when
the
Impact
 Character
forces
the
Main
Character
to
change
(literally!)CHARACTERS
NAME:
Goku CHARACTERS
NAME:
Lord
FriezaSPECIAL
ID:
Main
Character SPECIAL
ID:
Impact
CharacterTYPE:
Protagonist TYPE:
Antagonist
  • 16. Heroes and Villains Example: Death Note (2008) The Main Character is this idealistic serial killer who spends most of the story trying not to be discovered while the Impact Character is the brilliant detective after him.  CHARACTERS
NAME:
Riato CHARACTERS
NAME:
LSPECIAL
ID:
Main
Character SPECIAL
ID:
Impact
CharacterTYPE:
Antagonist TYPE:
Protagonist
  • 17. Review• Eight Character Archetypes• Complex Characters• Heroes and Main Characters• Villains and Impact Characters
  • 18. Typical CharacterDevelopment Problems• I want a main character who is NOT a hero Make your main character someone other than the protagonist of the story.
  • 19. Typical CharacterDevelopment Problems• I want a main character who is NOT a hero Make your main character someone other than the protagonist of the story.• My characters are little more that set decoration. How can I make them essential to the story? Assign character functions to the characters. This makes them essential to the exploration of the story.
  • 20. Typical CharacterDevelopment Problems• My characters are too simple. How can I give them greater dimensionality? Make them more “real?” Make your characters complex by assigning them atypical character functions. Complex characters seem more “real” than the simpler Archtypes. Making them the Main or Impact Character gives them greater depth.
  • 21. Questions?A downloadable PDF of this Session will be available at Dramatica.com
  • 22. Character Dimensions• Motivation—the drive to resolve problems• Methodology—the means taken to resolve problems• Evaluation—the standards by which progress is determined while resolving problems• Purpose—the end sought by resolving problems
  • 23. Character Dimensions• Sixteen (16) Motivation Elements• Sixteen (16) Methodology Elements• Sixteen (16) Evaluation Elements• Sixteen (16) Purpose Elements• A total of Sixty-Four (64) Character Elements with which to build your Objective Characters
  • 24. Character DimensionsWell-rounded Complex Characters shouldhave character elements from all fourcharacter dimensions.
  • 25. Example MultilevelProtagonist Archetype • Motivation: Pursue • Methodology: Proaction • Purpose: Actuality • Evaluation: EffectAn archetypal Protagonist is driven topursue, acts proactively to get real worldresults, and evaluates how it’s doing by itseffectiveness. (Think “James Bond.”)
  • 26. Example Multilevel Sidekick Archetype • Motivation: Support • Methodology: Protection • Purpose: Inertia • Evaluation: ResultAn archetypal Sidekick is driven to providesupport, acts protectively to keep things theway they are, and evaluates how it’s doing bythe results of its efforts. (Think “Pepper Potts”)
  • 27. Changing an Archetypeto a Complex Character • Motivation: Pursue • Methodology: Proaction • Purpose: Actuality • Evaluation: Effect An archetypal Protagonist is driven to pursue, acts proactively to get real world results, and evaluates how it’s doing by its effectiveness.
  • 28. Changing an Archetypeto a Complex Character • Motivation: Pursue • Methodology: Inaction • Purpose: Actuality • Evaluation: Effect The complex character is driven to pursue, does not take action in order to achieve real world results, and evaluates how it’s doing by its effectiveness. (Think “Ghandi.”)
  • 29. Changing an Archetypeto a Complex Character • Motivation: Pursue • Methodology: Inaction • Purpose: Desire • Evaluation: Effect The complex character is driven to pursue, does not take action in order to be more desireable, and evaluates how it’s doing by its effectiveness.
  • 30. Consider Logic Pursue Control Un- Avoid / Feeling Reconsider controlled Prevent Faith Conscience Support HelpTemptation Disbelief Hinder Oppose