Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn specific neural firing neural implants could spark better decisions by eliška pätoprstá
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Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn specific neural firing neural implants could spark better decisions by eliška pätoprstá

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Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn_specific neural firing Neural implants could spark better decisions by ...

Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn_specific neural firing Neural implants could spark better decisions by ELIŠKA PÄTOPRSTÁ

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Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn specific neural firing neural implants could spark better decisions by eliška pätoprstá Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumn specific neural firing neural implants could spark better decisions by eliška pätoprstá Presentation Transcript

  • Facilitation and restoration of cognitive function in primate prefrontal cortex by a neuroprosthesis that utilizes minicolumnspecific neural firing or Neural implants could spark better decisions ELIŠ KA PÄTOPRS T Á 17.10.12
  • • electronic brain implant • short-term memory and decision-making in primates • Alzheimer’s disease, dementia
  • • neurons “fire” when they receive an input from another neuron • the pattern of this activity  – where and when the neurons fire   – can be detected and recorded
  • • 5 rhesus macaques • 2 years • pool of 5000 images
  • •RESULTS: • 75% correct matches •40% longest waiting interval & maximum amount of images to choose from
  • • enhancing the animals’ decision-making process • implant kicked in whenever the neuronal activity in layers 2/3 resembled that seen when an incorrect decision was being made. • improving avg. performance by 10 to 20 % • hardest task: 2 rather than 3 seconds to correctly identify the image.
  • • monkeys on cocaine • implant turned off–performance dropped 10% • implant turned on – back to normal • just below levels seen in monkeys who hadn’t been given cocaine or an implant
  • Concerns: •it is not clear what exactly is going on • step around understanding, by recognising what a correct decision looks like, recording that pattern and playing it back • patterns of activity - specific to each monkey • invasive nature of implants - inflammation and scarring
  • http://engineeringevil.com/2012/09/20/neur al-implants-could-spark-better-decisions/ http://iopscience.iop.org/17412552/9/5/056012 /pdf/17412552_9_5_056012.pdf