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CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
CCCOER Writing commons webinar
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CCCOER Writing commons webinar

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Presentation by Writing Commons, an open textbook community to the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources on Feb 28, 2012.

Presentation by Writing Commons, an open textbook community to the Community College Consortium for Open Educational Resources on Feb 28, 2012.

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  • ELLUMINATE/CCC Conference Opening Script [Start recording…] Welcome to the ________ Webinar for DAY, MONTH, YEAR [sponsored by]. [If applicable] Today’s guests come to us from _______ in ____, ___. I will introduce them shortly, but first I want to go over a few details about this [Elluminate/CCC Confer] session for those who are new to [Elluminate/CCC Confer].DetailsAt the upper left of your screen, you should see the Participants window, which lists the participants in this session. You can use the icons underneath this window to:Raise your hand if you have a question or comment and you wish to speakThere are also happy and sad faces and an applaud icon Below the Participants window is the Chat window to the center-left of this screen where you can type a question or comment into the box at any time. You can also send a private message to another participant at any time, but please be aware that moderators can see all private messages.Below the chat area is the Audio window in the bottom left of the screen. Click on the raised your hand button to let us know you would like to speak. You can use a head set or your phone for audio chat. If you are using a microphone and have been recognized to speak, Click the button with the microphone on it and begin speaking. Remember to click the button again when you finish speaking so that someone else can have a turn. You can control your mic and volume levels with the sliders. And if you are having trouble with your headset or microphone, you can access the Audio Setup Wizard from the Tools menu on the top toolbar. From Tools, select Audio, and then Audio Setup Wizard, and follow the on-screen instructions.[CCC Confer ONLY] If you are using the telephone to speak, Click on the phone handset below the microphone and audio volume sliders. The call-number and pin will then appear in a dialog box.
  • Viewed through multiple lens Founder/Developer/Author Social Pedagogy Editor Managing Editor Undergraduate Student
  • What do we mean when we say we aspire to be a "commons-based peer production" community?Peer Production Projects are like 21st Century barn-building; they allow for massive acts of collaborative creation by asking for just a little effort from each contributor. As espoused by both scholarly authors (Benkler; Brown and Duguid; boyd and Ellison; Barton and Cummings; Jenkins) and trade book authors (Li and Bernoff; Gillmor; Tapscott and Williams; Weinberger), peer-production tools democratize power, redistributing the means of production from a one-way communication model, like a CBS broadcasting tower, to an increasingly community-driven model, where individuals contribute freely and democratically. Peer-production technologies are more powerful than they might at first seem: they allow users to add content which affects the way knowledge is constructed.  Perhaps the most intriguing idea to emerge from the evolution of social media and peer production is the possibility of collective intelligence, the notion that crowds of people working collaboratively via an online tool such as Wikipedia can create ideas that are unique, different, and smarter than the ideas of individuals working in collaboration. James Surowiecki, George Siemens, Henry Jenkins, and Howard Rheingold have theorized that peer-production tools empower users to create a new “emergent” knowledge that individuals working alone could not develop. Peer-production technologies change the ways we exchange ideas, organize ourselves, and create knowledge (Weinberger; Shirky; Jenkins); encourage democratic decision-making (Benkler; Shirky; Rheingold); transform how people write and think about ourselves (Lanier); and encourage ethical behavior (Benkler and Nissenbaum). It’s only natural, then, that they also change how we organize our institutions of higher learning (Taylor, “End of the University.”), particularly textbooks
  • What do we mean when we say we aspire to be a "commons-based peer production" community?Peer Production Projects are like 21st Century barn-building; they allow for massive acts of collaborative creation by asking for just a little effort from each contributor. As espoused by both scholarly authors (Benkler; Brown and Duguid; boyd and Ellison; Barton and Cummings; Jenkins) and trade book authors (Li and Bernoff; Gillmor; Tapscott and Williams; Weinberger), peer-production tools democratize power, redistributing the means of production from a one-way communication model, like a CBS broadcasting tower, to an increasingly community-driven model, where individuals contribute freely and democratically. Peer-production technologies are more powerful than they might at first seem: they allow users to add content which affects the way knowledge is constructed.  Perhaps the most intriguing idea to emerge from the evolution of social media and peer production is the possibility of collective intelligence, the notion that crowds of people working collaboratively via an online tool such as Wikipedia can create ideas that are unique, different, and smarter than the ideas of individuals working in collaboration. James Surowiecki, George Siemens, Henry Jenkins, and Howard Rheingold have theorized that peer-production tools empower users to create a new “emergent” knowledge that individuals working alone could not develop. Peer-production technologies change the ways we exchange ideas, organize ourselves, and create knowledge (Weinberger; Shirky; Jenkins); encourage democratic decision-making (Benkler; Shirky; Rheingold); transform how people write and think about ourselves (Lanier); and encourage ethical behavior (Benkler and Nissenbaum). It’s only natural, then, that they also change how we organize our institutions of higher learning (Taylor, “End of the University.”), particularly textbooks
  • Transcript

    1. advancing formal and informal learning through the worldwide sharing and use of free, open, high-quality education materials organized as courses. Writing Commons“An Open Textbook Community for College Level Writers”Joe Moxley, Quentin Vieregge, Karen Langbehn, Katelin Kaiser University of South Florida February 28, 2012 1-888-886-3951 (204829)
    2. Elluminate Window Overview Participants Emoticons Chat TYPE COMMENT HERE Audio ONOFF
    3. WelcomePlease introduce yourself in the chat window TYPE HERE– Una Daly • Community College Outreach Manager at Open Courseware Consortium.
    4. Join us for Open Education Week openeducationweek.orgMarch 5-10, 2012• Local events• Live webinars• Pre-recorded short videos (captioned)• Websites, Handouts, etc – Submit online form by end-January – Submit event or item by mid-February
    5. CCCOER coming to …• Innovations 2012 (March 4 Reception) – Cathy Casserly, CEO Creative Commons• OCWC Innovation & Impact (April 16-18) – Community College OER Panel• ACRL Iowa State (May 18-20) – Board member presentation by Kate Hess
    6. CCCOER Advisory Board• President: – James Glapa-Grossklag, College of the Canyons• Vice-President: – Angela Secrest, Houston Community College• Members at large: – Judy Baker, Foothill College – Robin Donaldon, Florida Distance Learning – Lorah Gough, Houston Community College – Susie Henderson, Educause – Andrea Henne, San Diego Community College District – Kate Hess, Kirkwood Community College – John Makevich, College of the Canyons – Joanne Munroe, Tacoma Community College – David Nelson, Florida Distance Learning – Jean Runyon, Anne Arundel Community College – Donna Gaudet, Scottsdale Community College
    7. Agenda• Joe Moxley: Overview & Vision• Katelin Kaiser: Undergraduate Student Perspective• Karen Langbehn: Web Tour• Quentin Vieregge: How to Contribute• Q&A
    8. Publisher & CEO “Chief of Openness”Joe Moxley Professor of English and Director of Composition at the University of South Florida, Moxley has published books, articles, and chapters. The core of Writing Commons received the Distinguished Book Award in 2004 from Computers and Composition
    9. • First, we provide the equivalent of a free writing textbook--the sort of rhetoric and reader that typically costs anywhere from $75 to $100.• Second, in the spirit of the cultural commons, we invite our readers, particularly college faculty, to help us develop this text, so that it meets the needs of students in diverse writing courses. – Beyond expanding Writing Commons so it could be the required text for technical and professional writing courses, fiction courses, creative nonfiction courses--and so on--we hope to inspire our colleagues to introduce new media elements, from videos, podcasts, to interactive components. Please see our Guide for Authors – for details on how you can get involved!• [Third, because we believe students learn chiefly by writing and by sharing reviews of one anothers texts, we provide a writing space for students to develop profile pages, chat with classmates, and share pictures and notes: Community! ]
    10. Steve E. Carson, MITDianne Donnelly, USFJames P. Gee, Arizona State University Peer ReviewGraeme Harper, Oakland UniversityCharlie Lowe, Grand Valley StateMike Palmquist, Colorado StateDaisy Pignetti, University of Wisconsin-StoutAlex Reid, SUNY BuffaloHoward Rheingold, StanfordShirley Rose, Arizona State UniversityGeorge Siemens, Athabasca UniversityGregory L. Ulmer, UFMC Morgan, Bemidji State UniversityBronwyn T. WilliamsJanice Walker, Georgia Southern UniversitySusan Lang, University of LouisvilleDavid Wiley, BYU
    11. Web Editor• Katelin Kaiser Undergraduate student majoring in Philosophy at the University of South Florida. She is concentrating in biomedical ethics, contemporary ethical theory, and law.
    12. Student Experience Writing Commons• Introduce major sections of webtext• What resources are important to my peers?• What resources do I find useful?
    13. Incorporating Evidence• How to Summarize and Paraphrase Sources.• "Understand When Citations are Necessary”
    14. Peer Reviewing• Providing and receiving feedback in group situations• Questions to consider• Document review guidelines
    15. Remediation Process• Translating a text from its source format into a new medium – Text to Visual – Text to Text
    16. Social Pedagogy Editor• Karen Langbehn Doctoral student in English, with a concentration in Rhetoric and Composition. Shes most interested in the rhetoric of science, science policy, and technology, as well as the public understanding of science and technology, and new media composing.
    17. Social Pedagogy + Collaboration• What is it and what’s in it for (all of) us? – Synthesizing research, writing, and communications – A pedagogical practice and professionalization – Participation in the conversation – Democratizing knowledge exchanges between learners
    18. Managing Editor• Quentin Vieregge Assistant Professor of English at University of Wisconsin-Barron County where he teaches first- year composition, business communication, film, and religious literature. Quentin also directs the writing tutors at the campus learning center and his research interests include collaborative writing through peer production.
    19. Submission & Review• How are we defining “webtext”? • Guide for Authors• An example of a webtext
    20. Multimedia Webtext Submission• Submissions Process• Review Process• Long-term Goals
    21. How can you contribute?• Today• Long-term Scope – New Media – Tech Communication – Creative Writing
    22. Thank you for attending!Please raise your hand to ask a question or type in the chat window. Contact Information Una Daly:unatdaly@ocwconsortium.org Joe Moxley: joe@writingcommons.org Quentin Vieregge quentin@writingcommons.org Karen Langbehn karen@writingcommons.org
    23. Next CCCOER Webinar March 27 at 12:00 pm PacificCreating OER Friendly Policies at Your College It takes a village with … James Glapa-Grossklag, College of the Canyons Dr. Andrea Henne, San Diego College District Dr. Robin Donaldson, Florida Distance Learning Consortim

    24. Photo credits: Share http://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4424154829/in/photostream/ IMG_4591 http://www.flickr.com/photos/bionicteaching/4700979984/ cc-by-sa La belle tzigane http://www.flickr.com/photos/joyoflife/21063837 cc-by-sa Asian Library Interior 5 http://www.flickr.com/photos/ubclibrary/453351638/ cc-by-nc-sa Petruhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/joyoflife/23724427/ cc-by-nc-sa Opensourcewayshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/opensourceway/4371000710/ cc-by-sa

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