Sse Shaping Strategy Group6

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SSE Shaping Strategy Group 6 PPT

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Sse Shaping Strategy Group6

  1. 1. Shaping Strategy <ul><li>In a World of Constant Disruption </li></ul>Group 6 John Hallberg 70398 Pierre Jarméus 20967 Carl Sundberg 40083 Simone Masog 40098
  2. 2. The game industry is plagued by: Inefficient distribution Piracy and cheating Communication problems between players Lack of a common platform A famous entertainment company called Valve comes along with the solution. The solution is called STEAM and is a platform for connecting people & games, make it easier for players as well as defeating piracy issues on a broad scope. Solution and our example: Current attempts: Are based on each other and fail to solve the problem and often make it more difficult for various stakeholders. Before we go on we will briefly introduce our example company and the problems that existed when they started their shaping strategy
  3. 3. Now the article: Source: John Hagel III, John Seely Brown & Lang Davison, “Shaping Strategy in a World of Constant Disruption”, HBR 2008
  4. 4. The changing business environment <ul><li>Change is now exponential and equilibrium is never reached in the market. </li></ul><ul><li>Business no longer goes through the typical cycle of adaptation to disruptive technologies. </li></ul><ul><li>The result is that adaptation is no longer a sufficient strategy to stay relevant today. </li></ul><ul><li>Change is also compounded by the changing infrastructure (for example computing, storage and bandwidth). </li></ul>Example: The STEAM infrastructure would not have worked 10 years ago due to its requirement that people are always online. Intro (1)
  5. 5. Rethink your strategy <ul><li>Traditionally you use risk-award calculus where the focus is on the risk side instead of action. </li></ul><ul><li>Enterprises today have to look further into the future and focus on the award side. </li></ul><ul><li>The rationale is that it helps motivate participants, so that aggressive action can be taken. </li></ul>Example: STEAM was a big risk due to the fact that it required changed consumer behavior as well as support from competitors. In fact, the concept was presented to for example Amazon and turned down. But Valve decided they needed the system and went along anyway. (source: Wikipedia) Intro (2)
  6. 6. Source: John Hagel III, John Seely Brown & Lang Davison, “Shaping Strategy in a World of Constant Disruption”, HBR 2008 How to formulate a shaping strategy (1)
  7. 7. Examples Example: The heart of STEAM is the STEAM PC program which combines all the functions of the STEAM platform. This can be seen as a part of “The Platform”. Example: Valve’s good reputation and fan base can be seen as beneficial when changing consumer behavior. The constant evolution of the Steam platform can be seen as signal commitment. This can be seen as a part of “Acts and Assets”. Example: When Valve started STEAM they wanted for example: automatic updates, improved anti-cheating, access to games from anywhere, in-game communication. Each of these goals were badly solved in the industry. During the development they also added the ability to sell games via the platform. This can be seen as “The View”. (Source: Wikipedia and own experiences) Example: You can buy the games on STEAM via PayPal or Click & Buy which makes these companies participants. How to formulate a shaping strategy (2)
  8. 8. Example: Some game developers (Disciples) are locking their games to STEAM. For example Modern Warfare 2 is locked to STEAM. Relic created a special version of one of their games in the early development stages of the STEAM platform to show how STEAM could be integrated into the game (Influencer). Source: John Hagel III, John Seely Brown & Lang Davison, “Shaping Strategy in a World of Constant Disruption”, HBR 2008 Three kinds of participants (1)

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