Design for Findability: metadata, metrics and collaboration on LOC.gov
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Design for Findability: metadata, metrics and collaboration on LOC.gov

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UXPA 2013 Annual Conference Friday July 12, 2013 3:00pm - 4:00pm ET by Jill MacNeice ...

UXPA 2013 Annual Conference Friday July 12, 2013 3:00pm - 4:00pm ET by Jill MacNeice

The Library of Congress has 2.2 million digitized searchable items online, including 89,000 web pages, and catalog records, books, musical scores, films, newspapers and 1 million plus images.

How does anyone ever find anything?

In Design for Findability, I’ll talk about what the Library of Congress is doing on the interface, in the back end, and at the institutional level, to make content and objects on LOC.gov more findable. And I invite you to share your own efforts to enhance findability on your sites. The goal is to create a framework for findability that be used for many different types of sites.

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  • http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8b29516/ Dorothea Lange #5 most searched woman on LOC.gov (Harriet Tubman is #1)
  • In the past 3 years, our work to answer these basic findability questions have transformed LOC.gov
  • Home Search pages circa 2000, from the Internet Archives Wayback Machine
  • Search results, old style
  • Search is front and center on home, search results and object detail pages.
  • Faceted search and descriptive search results, all fed by metadata
  • Examples of “dead end” legacy pages on LOC.gov
  • Object page as “Hub” with easy access to viewers and players and related content and collections, and searching
  • The Waldseemuller Map (1507), the first map to name North America, is one the treasures of the Library of Congress.
  • We used metrics and search analytics to determine the primary activities people come to LOC.gov to do.
  • New global header
  • New global footer
  • LOC.gov on a small screen, before responsive design
  • New, responsive home page on a smart phone
  • Even a search on the term “jukebox” brings up the National Jukebox as the 5 th result
  • Human, readable URLs are more shareable.
  • This is not really my area, but it’s a place where URL best practices – human readable URLs – are extremely important.
  • APIs include: ID.loc.gov, for librarians (Authorities, Subject Headings, etc) Our Prints and Photographs catalog Bill summaries for GPO to access and publish, available in the Fall 2013
  • 2 kinds of metadata: System metadata = metrics, search terms downloads, Page and Object metadata = metatags, URLs, etc.
  • We get regular reports on Search, Social Media, Mobile usage and shared pages
  • 6 months of searches on LOC.gov – over 2 million search terms
  • A long tail environment; most of the searches on LOC.gov are onesies and twosies
  • The Library’s Metadata standards. Vetted by staff, required by the Web Governance Board. No new content can go live without meeting the Metadata Standards, and verifying correct metadata is part of the QA process
  • The Metatag Generator tool on our intranet
  • The Library acquired the entire Twitter archive
  • Twitter has been a top search term on LOC.gov since the Library got the Twitter archives in spring of 2010
  • An updated on the Twitter archive was published last January
  • PDFs have limited ability to do metadata, but it can be done. We had to adjust how the fields were used to be consistent with our standards
  • Now this update is in the #3 position on LOC.gov search results
  • Also comes up high in Yahoo and Bing. (Still waiting for Google)
  • The report has consistently been a top download since it has become findable
  • All the different groups that must work together to make content findable on LOC.gov
  • The Recommended Links team has representatives from all divisions in the Library. We are primary advocates and educators about metadata, because we won’t elevate a page in search results unless it complies with the metadata standard.
  • It’s not really like trying to get the ball down the field to score a goal http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/ds.03743/
  • More like dancing, where you have to partner up with people and try not to step on eachother’s toes http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8a17197/?co=fsa Ben Shahn, 1937 US Farm Security Administration
  • And there are always the skeptics on the sidelines, who you try to convince to join in. http://www.loc.gov/pictures/resource/fsa.8a17234/?cofsa Ben Shahn, 1937 US Farm Security Administration

Design for Findability: metadata, metrics and collaboration on LOC.gov Design for Findability: metadata, metrics and collaboration on LOC.gov Presentation Transcript

  • Design for Findability: Metadata, Metrics & Collaboration on LOC.gov Jill MacNeice . July 2013 Web Services . jima@loc.gov @jmacneice . #UXPA2013
  • 2 About the Library of Congress • World’s largest library • World’s smallest book, “Old King Cole”
  • 3 About the Library of Congress • 155 million items in all collections • 35 million books and other print materials • 838 miles of bookshelves • Maps, recordings, photographs, sheet music, movies, artifacts
  • 4 About the Library of Congress • 17.5 million items in the online catalog • 2.2 million viewable items online
  • 5 Overview • What is Findability? • Findability Framework • Findability Tools (It’s all about the Metadata) • The Search for Twitter • Findability as Contact Sport • Findability on Congress.gov
  • What is Findability?
  • 7 What is Findability? Definition: The ease with which information in a website can be found, from both outside the site (using search engines) and by users already on the site. -- Wikipedia Peter Morville • Ambient Findability 2005 • Information abundance, overload • Primary problem: • how to find things • differentiate signal from noise • Emotional aspects of getting lost. Bottom Line: If you can’t find it – you can’t use it.
  • 8 How would you find this picture on LOC.gov?
  • Findability Framework
  • 10 Findability Framework 8 Pillars of Findability Internal 1. Can people find what they’re looking for quickly and easily? 2. From any object page, can people easily find other related content and access the rest of the site? 3. Does the overall high level organization make sense to the typical user? 4. Can people with small screens find and use our content?
  • 11 Findability Framework 8 Pillars of Findability External 5. Can people find our content from a search engine? (Google, Bing, etc) 6. Can people save and share content easily? 7. Do we reach out to our audience and not just wait for them to come to us? 8. Can our content be accessed, downloaded in bulk, and repackaged?
  • 12 Findability Framework (Internal) #1 Q: Can people find what they’re looking for quickly and easily? A: Big Search / Search Centric Too big to navigate: 17 million items in search results 2.2 million available online - Big search box on every page - Faceted searching (metadata) - Descriptive search results (metadata) - Recommended Links
  • 13 From This….. (http://archive.org/web/web.php)
  • 14 And This…..
  • 15 ….To This Big, bold search, Front & center on every page
  • 16 ….And This Metadata driven, faceted search Metadata driven, descriptive search results
  • 17 Findability Framework (Internal) #2 Q: From any object page, can users easily find other related content and access the rest of the site? A: Object page as Hub
  • 18 …To This “Nice to Know,” Related content based on metadata “Need to Know,” Bibliographic Record & metadata Viewers, players & downloadable images
  • 19 …and This ….. What the world looked like in 1507
  • 20 #3 Q: Does the overall high level organization make sense to the typical user? A: Global Header & Footer Findability Framework (Internal)
  • 21 …to This
  • 22 …and This
  • 23 Findability Framework (Internal) #4 Q: Can people using small screens easily find and access our content? A: Responsive design
  • 24 …to This
  • 25 #5 Q: Can people find what they’re looking for from a search engine (Google, Bing, etc)? A: Organic SEO Findability Framework (External)
  • 26 …and This
  • 27 #6 Q: Can people save and share content easily? A: Share tool Findability Framework (External)
  • 28 ….to This http://thomas.loc.gov/cgibin/bdquery/D? d113:1:./temp/~bdw2lA:@@@L&summ2=m&|/home/LegislativeData. php| http://beta.congress.gov/bill/113th-congress/house-bill/499 URL Design
  • 29 #7 Q: Do we reach out to our audience, and not just wait for them to go looking for us? A: Social media outreach Findability Framework (External) Blogs
  • 30 #8 Q: Can users access and repackage our content? A: APIs – ID.loc.gov, Prints and Photographs, Bill Summaries for GPO etc. Findability Framework (External) Open Government -- ID.loc.gov -- Prints and Photographs Catalog, -- Bill Summaries for GPO
  • 31 …to This
  • Any Questions?
  • Findability Tools (It's all about the metadata)
  • 34 System Metadata • Metrics - Omniture, Foresee, - Share Tool Metrics • Search Term downloads Tools: It’s all about the metadata Page and Object Metadata • Metadata Standards - HTML, - DC (Dublin Core) - Others (Canonical, etc) • URL Best Practices
  • 35 Tools: System Metadata
  • 36 Tools: Search Term Analytics 6 months of searches July-Dec 2012 2 million searches
  • 37 Tools: Search Term Analytics 6 months of searches July-Dec 2012
  • 38 Tools: Metadata Standards
  • 39 Tools: Metatag Generator
  • 40 Tools: Metatag Generator Output of the Metatag Generator <title>Congress.gov | Library of Congress</title> <meta property="description" content="U.S. Congress legislation, Congressional Record debates, Members of Congress, legislative process educational resources presented by the Library of Congress" /> <meta property="dc.subject" content="Legislative Data" /> <meta property="dc.identifier" content="http://beta.congress.gov/" /> <meta rel="canonical" href="http://beta.congress.gov/" /> <meta property="dc.type" content="Legislation" /> <meta property="dc.type" content="Web page" /> <meta property="dc.rights" content="Text is U.S. Government Work" /> <link rel="dc.rights" title="Rights Restriction" href="http://www.loc.gov/text-us-government-work" />
  • 41 Tools: Metadata & Findability Findablity Concept Model
  • 42 The Search for Twitter A Findability Story with Metadata as the Hero …….and a Happy Ending
  • 43 The Search for Twitter One fine day in April 2010….
  • 44 The Search for Twitter People wanted this……
  • 45 The Search for Twitter But they got links to this….
  • 46 The Search for Twitter Then one day
  • 47 The Search for Twitter Title = Title Author = Contributor Subject = Description Keywords = Subject We added metadata
  • 48 The Search for Twitter
  • 49 The Search for Twitter
  • 50 The Search for Twitter Twitter report is a top download:
  • 51 Findability as a Contact Sport
  • 52 Findability as Contact Sport QA Team
  • 53 Findability as a Contact Sport Recommended Links Team
  • 54 Findability as a Contact Sport
  • 55 Findability as a Contact Sport Ben Shahn, 1937 US Farm Security Administration
  • 56 Findability as a Contact Sport Ben Shahn, 1937 US Farm Security Administration
  • 57 Thank You Jill MacNeice . July 2013 Web Services . jima@loc.gov @jmacneice . #UXPA2013