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Learning Disability and Dementia, Dr Karen Watchman, Promises to Practice - Dementia Strategy 2 Conference, University of the West of Scotland, August 2013
 

Learning Disability and Dementia, Dr Karen Watchman, Promises to Practice - Dementia Strategy 2 Conference, University of the West of Scotland, August 2013

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  • Learn from early examples – too long to identify change, too long to put funding in place, impact on friends and peers especially after death of person with iDIn order to take that proactive approach there needs to be an understanding of the disease process and progression and what will be needed at each step along the way. Staffing levels, environmental adaptations. Our greatest struggle, however, is in accommodating people who experience changes, prior to demonstrating skill and memory loss associated with dementia, that are indicative of damage to the frontal lobe of the brain. Ball et al.(2005), found that some people with Down syndrome seem to experience changes in personality and behaviour, prior to the demonstration of characteristics connected to Alzheimer’s diseaseStaff try to keep people for as long as possible -sometimes for the best not always, just as winniserv in canada developed dementia specific accom so some organisations and local authorities are also considering the same – some ldans dementia and some for people ageing generally with LDFamily situation – some live with sibling or parents or peers rather than spouse of children, but lets remember too that others live alone, often with minimal support, or live with a partner or their husband or wife. Esay stats published last week show that according to 2012 figures the majority of pwld aged 35 and under lived with family care. Over 35 this changes
  • Entitled to one years post diagnostic support from a trained and knowledgable link worker – trained and knowledgable about LD as well as dementia. As image suggests it can be the same old way – for many people with LD this would mean working towards increasingly independent lifestyle -learning disability services are not picking up quickly enough that this needs to change, staff need to relearn the way support is provided – we hear ‘if you get the environment right for people with dementia you get it right for everyone else’Same applies – if we get the environment right for people with LD and dementia – we get it right for others ageing with a learning disability. And of course the debate is ongoing about where that environment is – we cannot continue to place people with a learning disability in their 40s in a care home of older people. Remembering of course that people with LD will also experience high levels of sensory loss, Rightly so this is very current – but what does a dementia enabled community look like to someone with a learning disability. Have we asked?We are already talking about a person who is marginalised and experiences stigma as a result of other peoples perception of their learning disability. May also be in employment or voluntary workRight to a diagnosis Just scratched the surface here of issues affecting people with learning disability and dementia, real opportunity presenting itself to do something new in terms of support and service provision. Let’s not let anybody down.

Learning Disability and Dementia, Dr Karen Watchman, Promises to Practice - Dementia Strategy 2 Conference, University of the West of Scotland, August 2013 Learning Disability and Dementia, Dr Karen Watchman, Promises to Practice - Dementia Strategy 2 Conference, University of the West of Scotland, August 2013 Presentation Transcript

  • #DStrat2 Learning Disability and Dementia Karen Watchman
  • Overview Support for • Risk factor carers • Diagnosis and postdiagnostic support • Redesign of services
  • Risk factor Risk in people with Down’s syndrome: • 10% in 40s • 30%+ in 50s • 50%+ aged 60 and over Risk in people with other types of learning disability: • 13.1% aged 60+ • 18.3% aged 65 and older • Alzheimer's disease, Lewy body, frontotemporal ….
  • Diagnosis and post-diagnostic support Diagnosis difficult Baseline assessments Misdiagnosis Fronto-temporal links? Effectiveness of medication? • Diagnosis often not given – so how can post-diagnostic support begin? • • • • •
  • • Loss of daily living skills • Difficulty with kerbs • General inactivity • Loss of sociability • Increased irritability • Stopping previously enjoyed activities • Stopping previously enjoyed activities • Stop spontaneous communication • Confusion • Short term memory loss
  • Redesign and transformation of services • Learn from early examples • Proactive approach • Lack of crossover between learning disability services and dementia services • eSAY statistics • Relearn the way we provide support
  • Scotland's National Dementia Strategy 2013-2016 • One years post-diagnostic support • Rights based • Embrace the process of redesign and transformation of services • All applies to people with learning disabilities too
  • Thank you Karen.Watchman@uws.ac.uk Alzheimer Scotland Centre for Policy and Practice Photographs from ‘Supporting Derek’ resource pack, Joseph Rowntree Foundation/University of Edinburgh